Oliver Twist

Oliver Twist

Mr. Brownlow Character Analysis

A man who becomes Oliver's adopted father at the end of the novel, Brownlow is robbed earlier in the novel by Bates and the Dodger, only to think that Oliver, who was with those two boys, was responsible. Brownlow recants his accusation and takes Oliver home, to nurture him, but when he sends Oliver out on a mission to return books (prompted by his friend Grimwig, to test Oliver's virtue), Oliver is re-taken by Fagin. Brownlow is distraught at what he believes to be Oliver's betrayal of him, but never entirely believes that Oliver is a bad at heart and spends the remainder of the novel solving the mystery of Oliver's birth and inheritance.

Mr. Brownlow Quotes in Oliver Twist

The Oliver Twist quotes below are all either spoken by Mr. Brownlow or refer to Mr. Brownlow. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Thievery and Crime Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Dover Publications edition of Oliver Twist published in 2002.
Chapter 12 Quotes

What's this? Bedwin, look there!
As he [Brownlow] spoke, he pointed hastily to the picture above Oliver's head; and then to the boy's face. There was its living coy. The eyes, the head, the mouth; every feature was the same. The expression was, for the instant, so precisely alike, that the minutest line seemed copied with a startling accuracy.

Related Characters: Mr. Brownlow (speaker), Oliver Twist
Page Number: 69
Explanation and Analysis:

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Chapter 49 Quotes

You must do more than that . . . make restitution to an innocent and unoffending child, for such he is, although the offspring of a guilty and most miserable love . . . .

Related Characters: Mr. Brownlow (speaker), Oliver Twist, Monks
Page Number: 319
Explanation and Analysis:

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Mr. Brownlow Character Timeline in Oliver Twist

The timeline below shows where the character Mr. Brownlow appears in Oliver Twist. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 10
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...into a bookstall near a part of town called Clerkenwell, the Dodger and Bates spot an elderly gentleman examining his books, and believe he is "green," a "good plant," someone from whom they... (full context)
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Oliver observes the Dodger steal the old man's handkerchief out of his pocket, and immediately the Dodger and Bates run away. Oliver is... (full context)
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...the Dodger, to avoid suspicion, also raise the cry of "Stop, thief!" shouted by the old man as he runs after Oliver. Others in the street answer the call as well, and... (full context)
Chapter 11
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The policeman walks Oliver to the magistrate's office, along with the old gentleman . Questioned by a guard at the magistrate's gate, however, the old gentleman says he... (full context)
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Oliver is thrown into a cell, and the old gentleman looks at him as this is being done; he swears he has seen something like... (full context)
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...over his courtroom with an iron fist. The old gentleman explains that his name is Brownlow, but before he is allowed to narrate the events of the case—and to plead on... (full context)
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Brownlow tells Fang he is worried that Oliver has been injured by the crowd's beating after... (full context)
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...conspired to steal the handkerchief—Oliver had nothing to do with it. Fang points out that Brownlow is still carrying a book he took from the bookseller's, during the commotion, and for... (full context)
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Brownlow is ushered outside by the guard, along with Oliver and the bookseller. Brownlow orders a... (full context)
Chapter 12
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Brownlow takes Oliver with him back to his house near Pentonville, a nice neighborhood of London... (full context)
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Brownlow enters the parlor soon after to see Oliver; when he does so, he cannot help... (full context)
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Then Brownlow immediately notices the likeness between Oliver and the woman in the picture, the one with... (full context)
Chapter 13
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..."Nolly." But a guard tells her, finally, that Oliver has been taken by "the gentleman" (Brownlow) into his home near Pentonville. Nancy takes this information back to Fagin, who dispatches Sikes,... (full context)
Chapter 14
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The narrator returns to Oliver, who has just awoken from his fainting fit at Brownlow's home, to discover that the picture of the unknown mysterious woman has been removed from... (full context)
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...of quiet and tranquility that enables Oliver to recover fully from his fever and illness. Brownlow orders a new suit of clothes for Oliver, who has never had new clothes before. (full context)
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Brownlow calls upon Oliver, after a few more days, to talk to him in his office.... (full context)
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Brownlow asks Oliver to narrate his life's story up till this point, which Oliver begins to... (full context)
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...steps, which he believes to be dangerous (for slipping), and which he decries repeatedly, as Brownlow laughs inwardly at his friend's strangeness. Brownlow eventually dismisses Oliver, asking him to return at... (full context)
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...friend that he believes Oliver is a faker, a young con-man, who is taking in Brownlow, and who means to deceive him in some way. Grimwig convinces Brownlow to test Oliver,... (full context)
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...so; Oliver goes out to return the book and money to the bookseller. Grimwig tells Brownlow that Oliver will not return, since he has on new clothes, some books, and five... (full context)
Chapter 15
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...of Nancy and Sikes, who begin dragging him back to Fagin's apartment. Meanwhile, Grimwig and Brownlow continue sitting in the parlor, wondering if Oliver will return. (full context)
Chapter 16
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...of them in. Bates, in particular, finds Oliver's new "togs" (clothes), bought for him by Brownlow, to be incredibly funny. (full context)
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...Fagin to keep Oliver's books. Oliver claims, desperately, to Fagin that the books belong to Brownlow, and that he will think Oliver has stolen them if he, and the books, aren't... (full context)
Chapter 17
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...enters a pub, only to read in the paper a notice regarding Oliver, placed by Brownlow, and offering a five-guinea reward for any information regarding his location or life history. Bumble,... (full context)
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Bumble is admitted to Brownlow's parlor, where Brownlow and Grimwig are sitting. Brownlow asks Bumble to tell what he knows... (full context)
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Mrs. Bedwin refuses to believe that Oliver is bad, but Grimwig is convinced, and Brownlow, with heavy heart, says he never wishes to hear any more about Oliver for as... (full context)
Chapter 32
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...journey, he takes a wagon with Losborne back to London, in order to meet with Brownlow and Mrs. Bedwin, and to explain why he never returned from his trip to the... (full context)
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Losborne and Oliver head to Brownlow's house, where they ring and find a servant. This servant, however, tells the pair that... (full context)
Chapter 40
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...Monks saw Oliver on the street on the day when the Dodger and Bates robbed Brownlow (by coincidence), and from this time on Monks promised Fagin money if Fagin could get... (full context)
Chapter 41
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Oliver tells Rose that he has spotted Mr. Brownlow in the street. Oliver wishes desperately to be reunited with the man who had given... (full context)
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...is in fact a good boy. Grimwig does not believe that this is possible, but Brownlow is clearly excited by the prospect that Oliver was, after all, telling the truth, and... (full context)
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Brownlow is overjoyed to see Oliver again, as is Mrs. Bedwin, who states, once more, that... (full context)
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...responsible for dragging Oliver back to Fagin, when Oliver was en route to the bookseller. Brownlow asks him, politely, to be calm, since only by proceeding calmly will they be able... (full context)
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Brownlow and Losborne go to the hotel to meet with Rose and Mrs. Maylie. Brownlow has... (full context)
Chapter 46
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Nancy keeps arrives at the bridge, and Rose and Brownlow arrive just after her. Noah sneaks along the bridge and hides himself in an alcove... (full context)
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Brownlow says that, if they cannot secure Monks, then Nancy will have to hand over Fagin... (full context)
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Nancy describes Monks to Rose and Brownlow, and tells how he might be found at the pub the Three Cripples. Brownlow gives... (full context)
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...with them, and that Nancy will take no money from them. Nancy tells Rose and Brownlow that, one day soon, she (Nancy) will die and become another forgotten soul in London.... (full context)
Chapter 49
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Between chapters, Brownlow has found Monks at the Cripples and has brought him, with help from servants, in... (full context)
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It is revealed by Monks, when the servants have gone, that Monks is Brownlow's "father's oldest friend." This is, naturally, a shock to the reader but not to the... (full context)
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Brownlow tells Monks that he has a brother—Monks does not at first admit that this is... (full context)
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Brownlow knows this because Monks' father stopped to see Brownlow on his way to Europe to... (full context)
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Brownlow tells Monks that it was he, Brownlow, who took Oliver in off the street, and... (full context)
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...hears all this but still refuses to admit to his plans for Oliver. Monks tells Brownlow he cannot prove that Oliver is the child of Monks' father and this woman. But... (full context)
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Brownlow also declares, to Monks, that murder has been done on account of this secret—as Sikes,... (full context)
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Brownlow tells Monks he will protect him if he swears to this version of events. Losborne... (full context)
Chapter 51
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Two days later, Oliver travels by carriage with Rose, Mrs. Maylie, Mrs. Bedwin, and Brownlow. Oliver has been told the nature of his connection to Monks, but Oliver still does... (full context)
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After dinner, Brownlow brings Monks before Oliver, and declares that Monks and Oliver are half brothers, that their... (full context)
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...good deal of money from his own mother, thus beginning his criminal career in London. Brownlow believes this to be the start of Monks' shameful behavior. (full context)
Chapter 52
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...hallucinating that he is still commanding the group of boys, Bates and Oliver included. Then Brownlow arrives with Oliver, and Fagin wonders why they have come to see him. (full context)
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Brownlow says they have come about some papers Fagin has, the location of which Fagin tells... (full context)
Chapter 53
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...parsonage where Harry works; Mrs. Maylie comes as well. Oliver's inheritance is meted out, by Brownlow, half to Oliver and half to Monks, since Brownlow believes this money might allow Monks... (full context)
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Brownlow officially adopts Oliver as his son. He and Oliver move to within a mile of... (full context)
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...narrator ends the novel by describing Oliver's happiness with his aunt Rose, his adopted father Brownlow, who educates him in the books he once promised Oliver would read, all in the... (full context)