The Cherry Orchard

by

Anton Chekhov

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Trophimof is the “perpetual student” who once worked as a tutor to Madame Ranevsky’s youngest child, Grisha, before the boy passed away suddenly at the age of seven just a little over five years ago. The shabby, idealistic Trophimof harbors secret feelings for Anya—but his revolutionary ideology and desire for Russia to march forward into a new future makes him believe he must be “above love” and sentimentality, and focus only on revolution and social change. Trophimof’s denial of his own emotions confuses and hurts both Anya and Ranevsky, though in the end he sets off alongside them to greet a “new life.”

Peter Trophimof Quotes in The Cherry Orchard

The The Cherry Orchard quotes below are all either spoken by Peter Trophimof or refer to Peter Trophimof. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Social Change Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Dover Thrift edition of The Cherry Orchard published in 1991.
Act 2 Quotes

LOPAKHIN: I should like to know what your opinion is of me?

TROPHIMOF: My opinion of you, Yermolai Alexeyitch, is this. You’re a rich man; you’ll soon be a millionaire. Just as a beast of prey which devours everything that comes in its way is necessary for the conversion of matter, so you are necessary too.

Related Characters: Yermolai Alexeyitch Lopakhin (speaker), Peter Trophimof (speaker)
Page Number: 23
Explanation and Analysis:

ANYA: What have you done to me, Peter? Why is it that I no longer love the cherry orchard as I did? I used to love it so tenderly; I thought there was no better place on earth than our garden.

TROPHIMOF: […] Think, Anya, your grandfather, your great-grandfather and all your ancestors were serf-owners, owners of living souls. Do not human spirits look out at you from every tree in the orchard, from every leaf and every stem? Do you not hear human voices? …Oh! It is terrible. Your orchard frightens me. When I walk through it in the evening or at night, the rugged bark on the trees glows with a dim light, and the cherry trees seem to see all that happened a hundred and two hundred years ago in painful and oppressive dreams. […]

ANYA: The house we live in has long since ceased to be our house; and I shall go away, I give you my word.

TROPHIMOF: If you have the household keys, throw them in the well and go away. Be free, be free as the wind.

ANYA: How beautifully you put it!

Related Characters: Anya (speaker), Peter Trophimof (speaker)
Related Symbols: The Cherry Orchard
Page Number: 26-27
Explanation and Analysis:
Act 3 Quotes

PISHTCHIK: The worst of it is, I’ve got no money. A hungry dog believes in nothing but meat. (Snoring and waking up again at once.) I’m just the same… it’s nothing but money, money with me.

[…]

(A sound of billiards being played in the next room. BARBARA appears in the drawing-room beyond the arch.)

TROPHIMOF (teasing her): Madame Lopakhin! Madame Lopakhin!

BARBARA (angrily): Mouldy gentleman!

TROPHIMOF: Yes, I’m a mouldy gentleman, and I’m proud of it.

BARBARA (bitterly): We’ve hired the band, but where’s the money to pay for it?

(Exit BARBARA.)

TROPHIMOF (to PISHTCHIK): If the energy which you have spent in the course of your whole life in looking for money to pay the interest on your loans had been diverted to some other purpose, you would have had enough of it, I dare say, to turn the world upside down.

Related Characters: Barbara (speaker), Peter Trophimof (speaker), Simeonof Pishtchik (speaker)
Page Number: 28-29
Explanation and Analysis:

MADAME RANEVSKY: Oh, if only I knew whether the property’s sold or not! It seems such an impossible disaster, that I don’t know what to think… I’m bewildered… I shall burst out screaming, I shall do something idiotic. Save me, Peter; say something to me, say something…

TROPHIMOF: Whether the property is sold to-day or whether it’s not sold, surely it’s all one? […] You mustn’t deceive yourself any longer; for once you must look the truth straight in the face.

MADAME RANEVSKY: […] You settle every important question so boldly; but tell me, Peter, isn’t that because you’re young, because you have never solved any question of your own as yet by suffering? […] show me just a finger’s breadth of consideration, take pity on me. Don’t you see? I was born here, my father and mother lived here, and my grandfather; I love this house; without the cherry orchard my life has no meaning for me, and if it must be sold, then for heaven’s sake tell me too! (Embracing TROPHIMOF and kissing him on the forehead.) My little boy was drowned here. (Crying.) Be gentle with me, dear, kind Peter.

Related Characters: Madame Lyubof Andreyevna Ranevsky (speaker), Peter Trophimof (speaker)
Related Symbols: The Cherry Orchard
Page Number: 32
Explanation and Analysis:

ANYA: Mamma! Are you crying, mamma? My dear, good, sweet mamma! Darling, I love you! I bless you! The cherry orchard is sold; it’s gone; it’s quite true, it’s quite true. But don’t cry, mamma, you’ve still got life before you, you’ve still got your pure and lovely soul. Come with me, darling; come away from here. We’ll plant a new garden, still lovelier than this. You will see it and understand, and happiness, deep, tranquil happiness will sink down on your soul, like the sun at eventide, and you’ll smile, mamma. Come, darling, come with me!

Related Characters: Anya (speaker), Madame Lyubof Andreyevna Ranevsky, Peter Trophimof
Related Symbols: The Cherry Orchard
Page Number: 39
Explanation and Analysis:
Act 4 Quotes

LOPAKHIN: In the spring I sowed three thousand acres of poppy and I have cleared four thousand pounds net profit. […] So you see, I cleared four thousand pounds; and I wanted to lend you a bit because I’ve got it to spare. What’s the good of being stuck up? I’m a peasant… As man to man…

TROPHIMOF: Your father was a peasant; mine was a chemist; it doesn’t prove anything. (LOPAKHIN takes out his pocket-book with paper money.) Shut up, shut up… If you offered me twenty thousand pounds I would not take it. I am a free man; nothing that you value so highly, all of you, rich and poor, has the smallest power over me; it’s like thistledown floating on the wind. I can do without you; I can go past you; I’m strong and proud. Mankind marches forward to the highest truth, to the highest happiness possible on earth, and I march in the foremost ranks.

LOPAKHIN: Will you get there?

TROPHIMOF: Yes. (A pause.) I will get there myself or I will show others the way.

Related Characters: Yermolai Alexeyitch Lopakhin (speaker), Peter Trophimof (speaker)
Page Number: 42
Explanation and Analysis:

ANYA (in the doorway): Mamma says, will you stop cutting down the orchard till she has gone.

TROPHIMOF: Really, haven’t you got tact enough for that?

(Exit TROPHIMOF by the hall.)

LOPAKHIN: Of course, I’ll stop them at once. What fools they are!

(Exit after TROPHIMOF.)

Related Characters: Yermolai Alexeyitch Lopakhin (speaker), Anya (speaker), Peter Trophimof (speaker)
Related Symbols: The Cherry Orchard
Page Number: 42
Explanation and Analysis:

(MADAME RANEVSKY and GAYEF remain alone [in the nursery.] They seem to have been waiting for this, throw their arms round each other’s necks and sob restrainedly and gently, afraid of being overheard.)

GAYEF (in despair): My sister! My sister!

MADAME RANEVSKY: Oh, my dear, sweet lovely orchard! My life, my youth, my happiness, farewell! Farewell!

ANYA (calling gaily, without) Mamma!

TROPHIMOF (gay and excited): Aoo!

MADAME RANEVSKY: One last look at the walls and the windows… Our dear mother sued to walk up and down this room.

GAYEF: My sister! My sister!

ANYA (without): Aoo!

MADAME RANEVSKY: We’re coming. (Exeunt.)

Related Characters: Madame Lyubof Andreyevna Ranevsky (speaker), Anya (speaker), Leonid Andreyitch Gayef (speaker), Peter Trophimof (speaker)
Related Symbols: The Cherry Orchard
Page Number: 48
Explanation and Analysis:
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The Cherry Orchard PDF

Peter Trophimof Character Timeline in The Cherry Orchard

The timeline below shows where the character Peter Trophimof appears in The Cherry Orchard. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act 1
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...her own messy hair than Dunyasha’s news. When Dunyasha tells Anya that a man named Trophimof has arrived at the house, though, Anya brightens up. (full context)
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...Their mother ran away to Paris without looking back. Anya worries that the arrival of Trophimof—who was Grisha’s tutor—will bring up awful memories. (full context)
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Trophimof, a shabby and bespectacled student, enters the room. He greets Ranevsky—he says once he heard... (full context)
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...the bedroom; in the orchard, a pipe begins playing. Anya comments on the nearby “bells.” Trophimof enters the room from one end as the girls exit through a door on the... (full context)
Act 2
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Trophimof, Anya, and Barbara approach the field. Ranevsky embraces her daughters while Lopakhin teases Trophimof for... (full context)
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Ranevsky asks Trophimof to continue the lecture he was giving them all yesterday about “the proud man.” Trophimof... (full context)
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...in her eyes, and asks if she’s all right; Anya answers that she’s just fine. Trophimof sees someone coming down the road—it is a tramp, who asks the way to the... (full context)
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Everyone but Trophimof and Anya heads back to the house; Anya says she’s grateful the bum came along... (full context)
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Anya asks Trophimof what he’s done to her—she no longer loves her once-precious cherry orchard. She once thought... (full context)
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Trophimof says that though he has had a difficult life marked by strife and inconstancy, he... (full context)
Act 3
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...in pairs. Everyone makes their way into the sitting room for a break. Pishtchik and Trophimof come first; Pishtchik explains that he has had two strokes already, but did not want... (full context)
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Barbara appears in the doorway—Trophimof, teasing her, calls out “Madame Lopakhin” over and over. In response, Barbara calls him a... (full context)
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Trophimof turns back to Pishtchik and tells him if the energy he had spent throughout his... (full context)
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...and Charlotte enter. Ranevsky asks where Gayef is—she wonders what could be taking so long. Trophimof suspects that Gayef has been unsuccessful at the auction. Ranevsky laments that today—auction day—was a... (full context)
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Trophimof starts teasing Barbara again, calling her Madame Lopakhin. Barbara teases Trophimof right back. Madame Ranevsky... (full context)
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...a billiard cue in the next room. Barbara, incensed, storms off to investigate. Ranevsky urges Trophimof to go easy on Barbara—the girl is unhappy enough already. Trophimof laments that Barbara has... (full context)
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Ranevsky worries that the property has sold—she hates not knowing. She begs Trophimof to say something that will comfort her. He tells her that whether the property sells... (full context)
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...a handkerchief and pulls out with it a telegram, which she drops to the floor. Trophimof picks up the telegram and hands it back to Ranevsky. She confides in him that... (full context)
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Trophimof urges Ranevsky to see that her lover has robbed her; he is a rascal who... (full context)
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...another room, followed by Barbara and Anya’s screams and laughter—Anya runs in laughing about how Trophimof has fallen down the stairs. A waltz starts up, and everyone goes off to dance.... (full context)
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...kitchen saying that the cherry orchard was sold. Anya goes back out to dance with Trophimof. Ranevsky, more anxious than ever, bids Yasha go find out who purchased the cherry orchard;... (full context)
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Anya and Trophimof enter the room; Anya goes to Ranevsky and kneels at her feet. She comforts her... (full context)
Act 4
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Trophimof enters, looking for his galoshes. He can’t find them anywhere. Lopakhin tells Trophimof that he... (full context)
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Lopakhin keeps trying to offer Trophimof money, encouraging him not to be stuck up. Trophimof says that even if Lopakhin offered... (full context)
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Lopakhin says it’s time to start off for the station, and bids Trophimof goodbye. He asks him if he’s heard that Gayef got a job at the bank;... (full context)
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...time for them all to start out on their new journeys. Anya, too, is excited. Trophimof comes in, followed by Lopakhin. They begin taking things out of the house. Ranevsky asks... (full context)
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...another and sob quietly, lamenting the loss of their youth and happiness. Outside, Anya and Trophimof call for them excitedly. The siblings take one last look at the room, and then... (full context)