The Killer Angels

The Killer Angels

by

Michael Shaara

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Arthur Lyon Fremantle Character Analysis

A Lieutenant Colonel in the Queen’s Coldstream Guards, Fremantle travels with the Confederates to record his observations for England. He is described as a scrawny man who resembles “a popeyed bird,” “perpetually astonished,” and “not too bright.” A cheerful man, Fremantle often solicits the opinions of Longstreet, who finds him amusing and eventually unburdens his doubts about Lee to him. Fremantle sees Southerners as essentially English gentlemen and sympathizes with their attitudes about honor. Like other Englishmen, however, he sees slavery as an “embarrassment” and a hindrance to explicit support of the Confederate cause.

Arthur Lyon Fremantle Quotes in The Killer Angels

The The Killer Angels quotes below are all either spoken by Arthur Lyon Fremantle or refer to Arthur Lyon Fremantle. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Honor Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Ballantine edition of The Killer Angels published in 1974.
Monday, June 29, 1863: Chapter 4 Quotes

Pickett answered obligingly, unconcerned, “Well, Jim Kemper kept needling our English friend about why they didn’t come and join in with us, it being in their interest and all, and the Englishman said that it was a very touchy subject, since most Englishmen figured the war was all about, ah, slavery, and then old Kemper got a bit outraged and had to explain to him how wrong he was, and Sorrel and some others joined in, but no harm done.”

“Damn fool,” Kemper said. “He still thinks it’s about slavery.”

Related Characters: George Pickett (speaker), Jim Kemper (speaker), Arthur Lyon Fremantle, G. Moxley Sorrel
Page Number: 62
Explanation and Analysis:
Wednesday, July 1, 1863: Chapter 5 Quotes

“Honor,” he said. “Honor without intelligence is a disaster. Honor could lose the war.”

Fremantle was vaguely shocked.

“Sir?”

“Listen. Let me tell you something. I appreciate honor and bravery and courage. Before God … but the point of the war is not to show how brave you are and how you can die in a manly fashion, face to the enemy. God knows it’s easy to die. Anybody can die.”

Related Characters: James Longstreet (speaker), Arthur Lyon Fremantle (speaker)
Page Number: 127
Explanation and Analysis:
Thursday, July 2, 1863: Chapter 1 Quotes

The Northerner doesn’t give a damn for tradition, or breeding, or the Old Country. He hates the Old Country … [T]he South is the Old Country. They haven’t left Europe. They’ve merely transplanted it. And that’s what the war is about.

Related Characters: Arthur Lyon Fremantle
Page Number: 156
Explanation and Analysis:
Thursday, July 2, 1863: Chapter 5 Quotes

“God in Heaven,” Longstreet said, and repeated it, “there’s no strategy to this bloody war. What it is is old Napoleon and a hell of a lot of chivalry. That’s all it is.”

Related Characters: James Longstreet (speaker), Arthur Lyon Fremantle
Page Number: 240
Explanation and Analysis:

Longstreet shook his head. That was another thing he did not think about. Armistead said disgustedly, “They think we’re fighting to keep the slaves. He says that’s what most of Europe thinks the war is all about. Now, what we supposed to do about that?”

Longstreet said nothing. The war was about slavery, all right. That was not why Longstreet fought but that was what the war was about, and there was no point in talking about it, never had been.

Related Characters: Lewis Armistead (speaker), James Longstreet, Arthur Lyon Fremantle
Page Number: 244
Explanation and Analysis:
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Arthur Lyon Fremantle Character Timeline in The Killer Angels

The timeline below shows where the character Arthur Lyon Fremantle appears in The Killer Angels. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Monday, June 29, 1863: Chapter 4: Longstreet
Idealism vs. Disillusionment Theme Icon
In Longstreet’s camp, the men are teaching Colonel Fremantle, an English war observer, to play poker. Longstreet sits under a tree nearby, watching and... (full context)
Honor Theme Icon
Old World vs. New World Theme Icon
Longstreet broods, instinctively sensing “an odor of trouble.” He is briefly diverted when Fremantle approaches him for advice on poker, after which Longstreet muses that the English are “a... (full context)
Old World vs. New World Theme Icon
Longstreet and Pickett introduce Pickett’s officers to Fremantle. Armistead jokes that the army is called “Lee’s Miserables,” after the currently popular novel Les... (full context)
Honor Theme Icon
Old World vs. New World Theme Icon
Idealism vs. Disillusionment Theme Icon
Slavery and Freedom Theme Icon
...Lee.” As their conversation comes to an end, the two find Sorrel and Kemper regaling Fremantle with arguments about “the Cause.” Kemper explains, “You must tell [England] … what we are... (full context)
Honor Theme Icon
Old World vs. New World Theme Icon
Slavery and Freedom Theme Icon
Pickett explains to Longstreet that, according to Fremantle, the English find support of the Confederacy to be a touchy subject, due to the... (full context)
Wednesday, July 1, 1863: Chapter 5: Longstreet
Old World vs. New World Theme Icon
Longstreet sees Fremantle approaching and welcomes the Englishman’s cheering presence. Fremantle has been enjoying himself, “continually amazed at... (full context)
Honor Theme Icon
Old World vs. New World Theme Icon
Idealism vs. Disillusionment Theme Icon
Longstreet feels depressed when he sees that Fremantle agrees with Garnett. Longstreet sees Garnett’s fate as “unturnable, ridiculous.” He goes on to tell... (full context)
Honor Theme Icon
Old World vs. New World Theme Icon
Longstreet continues trying to explain. In the earlier days of war, he tells Fremantle, two sides faced each other in the open, fighting from a distance with bows and... (full context)
Honor Theme Icon
Old World vs. New World Theme Icon
...to explain these realities to his own men, but they find his ideas “vaguely shameful.” Fremantle, too, is bewildered, protesting, “But, sir, there is the example of Solferino. And of course... (full context)
Thursday, July 2, 1863: Chapter 1: Fremantle
Old World vs. New World Theme Icon
Idealism vs. Disillusionment Theme Icon
Fremantle struggles awake and joins the other foreign observers for breakfast, reflecting on what a joy... (full context)
Honor Theme Icon
Old World vs. New World Theme Icon
Idealism vs. Disillusionment Theme Icon
Sorrel passes by and encourages Fremantle to stay near Longstreet, as that is where the action will be. Longstreet lets Fremantle... (full context)
Old World vs. New World Theme Icon
Fremantle asks Longstreet why his men have not entrenched, as there is nothing to stop the... (full context)
Old World vs. New World Theme Icon
Slavery and Freedom Theme Icon
Fremantle thinks about America, the contrast between its vastness and extremes and its cultural affinities with... (full context)
Honor Theme Icon
Old World vs. New World Theme Icon
Idealism vs. Disillusionment Theme Icon
Slavery and Freedom Theme Icon
Fremantle further muses that Southerners have the same love of tradition, form, and breeding as Europeans... (full context)
Thursday, July 2, 1863: Chapter 5: Longstreet
Honor Theme Icon
Old World vs. New World Theme Icon
Idealism vs. Disillusionment Theme Icon
Longstreet is approached by Fremantle, who congratulates him on his “victory.” Fremantle praises Lee effusively, sure that all of Europe... (full context)
Honor Theme Icon
Old World vs. New World Theme Icon
Idealism vs. Disillusionment Theme Icon
Longstreet can’t contain his words. “There’s no strategy to this bloody war,” he tells Fremantle; it’s “old Napoleon and a hell of a lot of chivalry.” He explains that they... (full context)
Idealism vs. Disillusionment Theme Icon
Fremantle appears shocked by the outburst. Longstreet, too, is alarmed by what he has said, “something... (full context)
Old World vs. New World Theme Icon
Slavery and Freedom Theme Icon
Armistead brings up Fremantle, the “not too bright” Englishman. He says he asked Fremantle why England won’t intervene to... (full context)
Friday, July 3, 1863: Chapter 5: Longstreet
Old World vs. New World Theme Icon
Idealism vs. Disillusionment Theme Icon
Fremantle, who moments before had been cheering wildly, grasps the reality of the situation and offers... (full context)