The White Devil

by

John Webster

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Camillo Character Analysis

Camillo is Vittoria’s husband and Monticelso’s nephew. Because Vittoria is openly having an affair with Brachiano, Camillo becomes a source of mockery for Flamineo and his friends: they tease Camillo that he is a “cuckold” and torment him with emasculating horn imagery. Camillo has no real allies or supporters, as even his uncle Monticelso is more concerned with revenge than with defending his nephew—he is willing to risk Camillo’s life to get evidence of Brachiano’s guilt. Flamineo ultimately murders Camillo on behalf of Brachiano, killing him during a horse vaulting competition. But though Camillo is victimized, he is not an entirely sympathetic character; he is portrayed as gullible, silly, and dull, quick to anger and unable to comprehend the complex plots that are unfolding around him.

Camillo Quotes in The White Devil

The The White Devil quotes below are all either spoken by Camillo or refer to Camillo . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
External Virtue vs. Internal Truth Theme Icon
).
Act 1, Scene 2 Quotes

FLAMINEO:
It seems you are jealous: I ’ll show you the error of it by a familiar example: I have seen a pair of spectacles fashioned with such perspective art, that lay down but one twelve pence a’ th’ board, twill appear as if there were twenty; now should you wear a pair of these spectacles, and see your wife tying her shoe, you would imagine twenty hands were taking up of your wife’s clothes, and this would put you into a horrible, causeless fury.

CAMILLO:
The fault there, sir, is not in the eyesight.

FLAMINEO:
True, but they that have the yellow jaundice think all objects they look on to be yellow. Jealousy is worse; her fits present to a man, like so many bubbles in a basin of water, twenty several crabbed faces, many times makes his own shadow his cuckold-maker.

Related Characters: Flamineo (speaker), Camillo (speaker), Brachiano, Vittoria
Page Number: 12
Explanation and Analysis:

FLAMINEO:
Come, sister, darkness hides your blush. Women are like cursed dogs: civility keeps them tied all day, but they are loose at midnight. Then they do most good or most mischief.

Related Characters: Flamineo (speaker), Vittoria, Brachiano, Camillo
Page Number: 20
Explanation and Analysis:
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The White Devil PDF

Camillo Character Timeline in The White Devil

The timeline below shows where the character Camillo appears in The White Devil. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act 1, Scene 2
Double Standards of Desire Theme Icon
Brachiano frets that Vittoria’s husband Camillo will get in the way, but Flamineo promises that Vittoria has no sexual feelings toward... (full context)
Double Standards of Desire Theme Icon
Camillo enters the room, interrupting Brachiano and Flamineo’s conversation. Brachiano promptly exits. Camillo complains to Flamineo... (full context)
Double Standards of Desire Theme Icon
Flamineo mocks Camillo for his jealousy, telling him that it is in fact his fear of being made... (full context)
External Virtue vs. Internal Truth Theme Icon
Double Standards of Desire Theme Icon
...Flamineo seizes the moment: though he is still loyal to Brachiano, Flamineo pretends to sing Camillo’s praises to Vittoria. Loudly, Flamineo tells his sister of Camillo’s high status and intelligence—but quietly,... (full context)
External Virtue vs. Internal Truth Theme Icon
Double Standards of Desire Theme Icon
...time to see Brachiano, Flamineo then executes the final step of his trick: he tells Camillo to separate himself from Vittoria for a night, thereby increasing her desire. Flamineo even convinces... (full context)
External Virtue vs. Internal Truth Theme Icon
Double Standards of Desire Theme Icon
Camillo, excited by this plan, hurries off, and Brachiano returns. As soon as he does, Vittoria’s... (full context)
External Virtue vs. Internal Truth Theme Icon
Punishment and Repentance  Theme Icon
...before. In the dream, Vittoria was sitting peacefully in front of a yew tree when Camillo and Brachiano’s wife, Isabella, approached her. Without explanation, Camillo and Isabella began to chase Vittoria,... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 1
External Virtue vs. Internal Truth Theme Icon
...the nefarious Doctor Julio. The doctor plans to help with the murders of Isabella and Camillo; he explains that Camillo will die a public death with a “politic strain,” while Isabella’s... (full context)
External Virtue vs. Internal Truth Theme Icon
Double Standards of Desire Theme Icon
Punishment and Repentance  Theme Icon
Camillo learns that someone has thrown horns through his window. Monticelso interprets this as a sure... (full context)
Class and Corruption Theme Icon
Monticelso believes that if Camillo spends some time away from Vittoria, his absence might make her long for him; to... (full context)
External Virtue vs. Internal Truth Theme Icon
Camillo leaves, resolving to get drunk and forget his troubles. In his absence, Monticelso and Francisco... (full context)
External Virtue vs. Internal Truth Theme Icon
Double Standards of Desire Theme Icon
Class and Corruption Theme Icon
Punishment and Repentance  Theme Icon
Monticelso and Francisco consider that their plan might put Camillo in real danger—but Monticelso decides that he would “stake a brother’s life, that being wrong’d,... (full context)
Act 2, Scene 2
External Virtue vs. Internal Truth Theme Icon
Class and Corruption Theme Icon
...meets in his home with a conjurer to plot out the mechanics of Isabella and Camillo’s deaths. The conjurer explains that though there are many frauds, he really can help predict... (full context)
Double Standards of Desire Theme Icon
Leading by Example vs. Leading by Force Theme Icon
In the second dumb show, Flamineo, Marcello, and Camillo all get drunk and compete to jump a vaulting horse. Just as Camillo is about... (full context)
Act 3, Scene 1
Double Standards of Desire Theme Icon
Punishment and Repentance  Theme Icon
It’s a few days later, and Camillo is now dead. At the court, Monticelso and Francisco try to figure out how they... (full context)
External Virtue vs. Internal Truth Theme Icon
Class and Corruption Theme Icon
...will do anything for material gain. Marcello reveals that he knows Francisco was involved in Camillo’s death, though he himself abstained from the plot. (full context)
Act 3, Scene 2
Leading by Example vs. Leading by Force Theme Icon
Punishment and Repentance  Theme Icon
...adultery proves that she is guilty of murder. Francisco focuses on the strange circumstances of Camillo’s death—how, Francisco wonders, could Camillo break his neck even though he only fell two yards?  (full context)
External Virtue vs. Internal Truth Theme Icon
Double Standards of Desire Theme Icon
Class and Corruption Theme Icon
Monticelso brings up the fact that Brachiano was staying with Vittoria the night Camillo died. Brachiano explains this away by saying that Vittoria was anxious about money—Camillo was in... (full context)
Double Standards of Desire Theme Icon
Class and Corruption Theme Icon
Monticelso then tells the court about the circumstances of Vittoria and Camillo’s marriage: they met in Venice, Vittoria’s hometown. Camillo spent lots of money courting her but... (full context)
Act 5, Scene 3
Double Standards of Desire Theme Icon
...After the banter dies down, Zanche reveals what happened in the murders of Isabella and Camillo: Isabella’s picture was poisoned, and “damn’d Flamineo” assaulted Camillo. (full context)