Always Running

by

Luis J. Rodriguez

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Mrs. Baez Character Analysis

Mrs. Baez is a teacher at Luis Rodriguez’s high school, as well as the sponsor of the Chicano cultural society. As a result, Mrs. Baez is instrumental in advising Luis and his peers while they’re planning grassroots political activism. There are many times when Mrs. Baez refuses to support Luis’s activism, even when it’s done in the name of Chicano rights. At other times, however, Baez is shown to be an important ally to Luis, standing up for him in front of Mr. Madison—and risking her own job in doing so.

Mrs. Baez Quotes in Always Running

The Always Running quotes below are all either spoken by Mrs. Baez or refer to Mrs. Baez. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Gangs and Crime Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Simon & Schuster edition of Always Running published in 2005.
Chapter 7 Quotes

We have somebody willing to teach you," Mrs. Baez said. "He's an instructor for a folklórico dance troupe at one of the colleges. You look Indian enough with your long hair. And I think it would help involve some of the hard-core Lomas students in what we're doing if you tried out."
What do you say, Louie?" Esme asked.
They knew they had me. I accepted as a formality.

Related Characters: Luis Rodriguez (speaker), Esmeralda Falcón (speaker), Mrs. Baez (speaker)
Page Number: 175
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Always Running LitChart as a printable PDF.
Always Running PDF

Mrs. Baez Character Timeline in Always Running

The timeline below shows where the character Mrs. Baez appears in Always Running. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 7
Politics, Resistance, and Activism Theme Icon
...ToHMAS, or To Help Mexican American Students. The club’s sponsor is a Chicano teacher named Mrs. Baez . Luis becomes more and more active in this club, which is intended to promote... (full context)
Race, Racism, and Class Theme Icon
Politics, Resistance, and Activism Theme Icon
Coming of Age and Mentorship Theme Icon
...a Chicano class, with a Chicano teacher—Chente. He tries to convince the ToHMAS teacher sponsor, Mrs. Baez , to support his idea, but she refuses. Luis has an idea to stage another... (full context)
Politics, Resistance, and Activism Theme Icon
Coming of Age and Mentorship Theme Icon
Soon after, Luis and many Chicano classmates—at least 300—walk out of their classes. Mrs. Baez has an angry meeting with Mr. Madison, in which Madison accuses her of helping organize... (full context)
Chapter 8
Race, Racism, and Class Theme Icon
Coming of Age and Mentorship Theme Icon
...school. Esmeralda and the other ToHMAS members just say they’re glad Luis is okay. However, Mrs. Baez is furious with Luis for setting a bad example for other Chicano students. Luis doesn’t... (full context)
Chapter 9
Politics, Resistance, and Activism Theme Icon
...opposite is true, Luis claims). Luis talks about organizing a walkout to protest Pérez’s firing. Mrs. Baez encourages him to wait for Mr. Madison to “work this out,” but Luis ignores her. (full context)
Politics, Resistance, and Activism Theme Icon
Coming of Age and Mentorship Theme Icon
Meanwhile, Mrs. Baez returns Luis’s stories and poems, telling him that they’re wonderful and suggesting that he submit... (full context)