Julius Caesar

Julius Caesar Character Analysis

Read our modern English translation.
A famous general, and husband to Calpurnia. His followers wish to make him king, causing Brutus, Cassius, and the other conspirators to kill him before that can happen. Though Caesar's ambition is supposedly the reason he is killed (according to both his murderers and to the rules of tragedy), we don't see much of this ambition in the play. The Caesar we see is certainly vain, even to the point of self-delusion, but also displays firm adherence to his principles and proves himself a perceptive judge of character. Caesar's greatness is evident not so much in himself as in the love he inspires in Antony and the bitter jealousy he inspires in Cassius. At times, Caesar seems to suspect his own imminent murder, but goes toward it anyway, almost as if he seeks martyrdom.

Julius Caesar Quotes in Julius Caesar

The Julius Caesar quotes below are all either spoken by Julius Caesar or refer to Julius Caesar. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the The Folger Shakespeare Library edition of Julius Caesar published in 1992.
Act 1, scene 2 Quotes
Beware the ides of March.
Related Characters: Soothsayer (speaker), Julius Caesar
Related Symbols: Omens
Page Number: 1.2.20
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt i

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other Julius Caesar quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!
Men at some time are masters of their fates:
The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars,
But in ourselves, that we are underlings.
Related Characters: Caius Cassius (speaker), Julius Caesar, Marcus Brutus
Page Number: 1.2.140-142
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut alLorem ipsLorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse c

Let me have men about me that are fat;
Sleek-headed men, and such as sleep o' nights.
Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look;
He thinks too much: such men are dangerous.
Related Characters: Julius Caesar (speaker), Caius Cassius
Page Number: 1.2.193-196
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cilluLoremLorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetLorem iLoreLorLorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Except

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea com

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit inLorem Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, conLoreLorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

But those that understood him smil'd at one another, and shook their heads; but for mine own part, it was Greek to me.
Related Characters: Casca (speaker), Julius Caesar
Related Symbols: Rome
Page Number: 1.2.294-295
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Act 2, scene 2 Quotes
Cowards die many times before their deaths;
The valiant never taste of death but once.
Of all the wonders that I yet have heard,
It seems to me most strange that men should fear;
Seeing that death, a necessary end,
Will come when it will come.
Related Characters: Julius Caesar (speaker)
Related Symbols: Omens, Body, Blood, & Pain
Page Number: 2.2.34-39
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culp

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Act 3, scene 1 Quotes
Caesar: The ides of March are come.
Soothsayer: Aye, Caesar, but not gone.
Related Characters: Julius Caesar (speaker), Soothsayer (speaker)
Related Symbols: Omens
Page Number: 3.1.1-2
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt molli

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Et tu, Bruté? — Then fall, Caesar!
Related Characters: Julius Caesar (speaker), Marcus Brutus
Related Symbols: Body, Blood, & Pain, Rome
Page Number: 3.1.85
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamcoLorem ipLorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitatio

Act 3, scene 2 Quotes
Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
The evil that men do lives after them;
The good is oft interred with their bones;
So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
Hath told you Caesar was ambitious:
If it were so, it was a grievous fault;
And grievously hath Caesar answer'd it.
Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest, —
For Brutus is an honorable man;
So are they all, all honorable men, —
Come I to speak in Caesar's funeral.
He was my friend, faithful and just to me:
But Brutus says he was ambitious;
And Brutus is an honorable man.
Related Characters: Mark Antony (speaker), Julius Caesar, Marcus Brutus
Related Symbols: Body, Blood, & Pain, Rome
Page Number: 3.2.82-96
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Act 5, scene 5 Quotes
This was the noblest Roman of all
All the conspirators, save only he,
Did that they did in envy of great Caesar;
He only, in a general honest thought,
And common good to all, made one of them.
His life was gentle; and the elements
So mix'd in him that Nature might stand up
And say to all the world, "This was a man."
Related Characters: Mark Antony (speaker), Julius Caesar, Marcus Brutus
Related Symbols: Body, Blood, & Pain, Rome
Page Number: 5.5.74-81
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Act 4, scene 3 Quotes
Remember March, the ides of March remember:
Did not great Julius bleed for justice' sake?
What villain touch'd his body, that did stab,
And not for justice? What, shall one of us
That struck the foremost man of all this world
But for supporting robbers, shall we now
Contaminate our fingers with base bribes,
And sell the mighty space of our large honours
For so much trash as may be grasped thus?
I had rather be a dog, and bay the moon,
Than such a Roman.
Related Characters: Marcus Brutus (speaker), Julius Caesar
Related Symbols: Omens, Body, Blood, & Pain, Rome
Page Number: 4.3.19-29
Explanation and Analysis:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

Get the entire Julius Caesar LitChart as a printable PDF.
Julius caesar.pdf.medium

Julius Caesar Character Timeline in Julius Caesar

The timeline below shows where the character Julius Caesar appears in Julius Caesar. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Act 1, scene 1
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
...instead of at work. The plebeians say they have come to cheer the great general Caesar's triumph over the sons of his rival Pompey. (full context)
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
...decide to split up and disperse more crowds, and to remove the laurel crowns from Caesar's statues. (full context)
Act 1, scene 2
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
Caesar enters with Antony, Calpurnia, Portia, Decius, Cicero, Brutus, Cassius, and Casca, followed by a Soothsayer... (full context)
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Fate Theme Icon
The Soothsayer warns Caesar to "Beware the ides of March" (1.2.19), but Caesar ignores his warning. (full context)
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
Cassius says that Brutus is greatly admired by all of Rome, and that everyone—"except immortal Caesar" (1.2.62)—wishes Brutus knew this. Brutus wonders why Cassius is trying to make him proud, since... (full context)
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
They hear cheering, and Brutus says he fears that Caesar is being crowned king. Cassius says that this possibility must displease Brutus, if he fears... (full context)
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
Brutus admits he is against the idea, although he loves Caesar, and asks Cassius to get to the point, saying that if it involves honor and... (full context)
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
Cassius says that he would rather be dead than bow to Caesar, since Caesar is no better than they. He tells Brutus about the time he saved... (full context)
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
...our stars, / But in ourselves, that we are underlings" (1.2.141-2). He then asks why Caesar should be more honored than Brutus, and brings up Brutus's famous ancestor who drove the... (full context)
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
...his "weak words" (1.2.177) were effective, and suggests they ask Casca what they missed, as Caesar's procession returns. Brutus says Caesar looks angry, and the others look like they've been scolded. (full context)
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
As he passes in the procession, Caesar tells Antony that Cassius looks too "lean and hungry" (1.2.195) to be trusted, saying it's... (full context)
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
Once Caesar is gone, Casca tells Brutus and Cassius that Antony offered Caesar a crown three times,... (full context)
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
...Flavius have been removed from their offices as tribunes because they took the wreaths from Caesar's statues. (full context)
Fate Theme Icon
...he plans to throw messages through Brutus's windows that night, praising Brutus's honor and impugning Caesar's ambition, and that afterwards it will be easier to move Brutus against Caesar. (full context)
Act 1, scene 3
Fate Theme Icon
...and a lion in the Capitol, which he interprets as bad omens. Cicero asks if Caesar is coming to the Capitol the next day, and Casca says yes. (full context)
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Fate Theme Icon
...imposing, need not be feared because he's no mightier than they. Casca guesses he means Caesar. (full context)
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
...for things to have come to this. Casca says that the senators mean to make Caesar king the next day. Cassius says "I know where I will wear this dagger then:... (full context)
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
...agrees that those who are enslaved have the power to free themselves. Cassius says that Caesar could never have risen so high if other Romans were not so weak, and that... (full context)
Act 2, scene 1
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
...his study. Alone, Brutus admits that the only possible course of action is to kill Caesar. He adds that, while Caesar's behavior so far gives no excuse for murder, it seems... (full context)
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
...he says that he hasn't slept since Cassius brought up the idea of moving against Caesar, and that the time leading up to a horrible deed feels like a rebellion within... (full context)
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
After Decius asks whether only Caesar will be killed, Cassius suggests they kill Antony as well, since he may oppose them... (full context)
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
Fate Theme Icon
Cassius says that Caesar's superstitions may keep him away from the Capitol, and Decius offers to go to Caesar... (full context)
Act 2, scene 2
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Fate Theme Icon
In Caesar's house, Caesar is awakened by both the storm and by his wife Calpurnia's talking in... (full context)
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
Fate Theme Icon
Calpurnia enters, telling Caesar he must not leave the house that day, but he insists that he will, since... (full context)
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
Fate Theme Icon
The servant enters and says that the priests advise Caesar not to go to the Capitol, since they found no heart in the sacrificial animal.... (full context)
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
When Calpurnia begs on her knees for Caesar to stay, he consents to send the message that he is sick, and remain at... (full context)
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
Decius entreats Caesar for an explanation, and Caesar admits that Calpurnia was frightened by a dream where a... (full context)
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Caesar decides to go to the Capitol after all. Cassius, Brutus, Ligarius, Metellus, Casca, Trebonius, and... (full context)
Act 2, scene 3
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
Fate Theme Icon
Artemidorus reads a letter he's written warning Caesar against each of the conspirators. He plans to stand by the Capitol and hand it... (full context)
Act 2, scene 4
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Fate Theme Icon
...asks if he is going to the Capitol. He says that he is, to warn Caesar. Portia asks if he knows of any specific threat against Caesar; he says he doesn't... (full context)
Act 3, scene 1
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Fate Theme Icon
Caesar approaches the Capitol with the conspirators, followed by Antony, Lepidus, Publius, Popillius, and other Senators.... (full context)
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
In the Capitol, Trebonius talks with Antony, to draw him away. Metellus kneels before Caesar to beg for the repeal of his brother's banishment. The other conspirators join him, in... (full context)
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
The conspirators stab Caesar—Casca first, Brutus last. Caesar's last words are "Et tu, Bruté?—Then fall Caesar" (3.1.76). The conspirators... (full context)
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
...will support Brutus if he may safely approach and be given a satisfactory explanation for Caesar's death. Brutus praises Antony and grants the request. Cassius remarks that he still doesn't think... (full context)
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
Antony enters, and is moved by the sight of Caesar's body. He says that if the conspirators intend to kill him, they should do it... (full context)
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
Alone, Antony predicts that a terrible war will engulf Rome as a result of Caesar's murder. A servant of Octavius enters to tell Antony that Octavius has almost arrived in... (full context)
Act 3, scene 2
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
Outside, assembled Plebeians demand an explanation for Caesar's death. Cassius leads half of them away while Brutus stays to address the others. Brutus... (full context)
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
Antony has entered with Caesar's body in a coffin. Brutus departs, turning the pulpit over to Antony. The crowd denounces... (full context)
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Antony says that he has "come to bury Caesar, not to praise him" (3.2.71). He says that the conspirators who claimed Caesar was ambitious... (full context)
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
...honorable Brutus and Cassius, or inciting the mob to riot. He mentions that he's found Caesar's will, which would make the people venerate Caesar if they knew its contents, but that... (full context)
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Antony describes Caesar's murder in graphic terms, and then uncovers Caesar's body. The crowd is ready to hunt... (full context)
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Antony finally reads Caesar's will, which promises a sum of money to every citizen, and announces the conversion of... (full context)
Act 4, scene 1
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
...those who should be executed for their part in the conspiracy. Antony suggests they amend Caesar's will so it pays out less money, and sends Lepidus to get it. Antony then... (full context)
Act 4, scene 2
Act 5, scene 3
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Fate Theme Icon
...Pindarus to kill him. Pindarus kills Cassius with the same sword Cassius used to stab Caesar. Pindarus then flees Rome forever. (full context)
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
Fate Theme Icon
...Young Cato, Strato, Volumnius, Lucillius, Labio and Flavius. On seeing the bodies, Brutus remarks that Caesar's Ghost is hunting them all down. He gives orders for Cassius's body to be taken... (full context)
Act 5, scene 5
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
...Antony's men closing in. Knowing that he is beaten, and revealing that he has seen Caesar's Ghost a second time, Brutus asks Clitus, Dardanius, and Volumnius in turn if they will... (full context)
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
Fate Theme Icon
...Antony says that Brutus was "the noblest Roman of them all" (5.5.67), because he killed Caesar out of genuine concern for the future of Rome, while the other conspirators were merely... (full context)
Act 4, scene 3
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
...habitually getting people out of trouble in exchange for bribes, adding that since they murdered Caesar for his corruption, it would be hypocritical of them to be corrupt now. (full context)
Manhood and Honor Theme Icon
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Politics and Morality Theme Icon
...than Brutus. Brutus disagrees, saying he is not afraid of Cassius. Cassius says that even Caesar never insulted him this way, and Brutus says that Cassius was too afraid of Caesar... (full context)
Logic and Language Theme Icon
Public vs. Private Theme Icon
Fate Theme Icon
...send a message to Cassius. Varrus, Claudio, and Lucius all fall asleep. The Ghost of Caesar appears, identifying himself as "Thy evil spirit, Brutus" (4.2.333) when, and saying he will appear... (full context)