Matilda

by

Roald Dahl

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Nigel is a boy in Matilda’s class at Crunchem Hall Primary School. He comes to school already knowing how to read some words. When Miss Trunchbull sits in on Miss Honey’s class the first time, she makes him stand in the corner on one foot as punishment for having dirty hands. He also annoys her by sharing that Miss Honey taught the entire class to spell “difficulty” using a song.

Nigel Quotes in Matilda

The Matilda quotes below are all either spoken by Nigel or refer to Nigel. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Adults, Children, and Power Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Puffin Books edition of Matilda published in 2007.
Chapter 13 Quotes

“How perfectly ridiculous!” snorted the Trunchbull. “Why are all these women married? And anyway you’re not meant to teach poetry when you’re teaching spelling. Cut it out in future, Miss Honey.”

“But it does teach them some of the harder words wonderfully well,” Miss Honey murmured.

“Don’t argue with me, Miss Honey!” The Headmistress thundered. “Just do as you’re told!”

Related Characters: Miss Trunchbull (speaker), Miss Honey (speaker), Nigel, Mrs. Wormwood
Page Number: 147
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 20 Quotes

“I wish I was grown up,” Nigel said. “I’d knock her flat.”

Related Characters: Nigel (speaker), Miss Trunchbull
Page Number: 215
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Matilda LitChart as a printable PDF.
Matilda PDF

Nigel Character Timeline in Matilda

The timeline below shows where the character Nigel appears in Matilda. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 7. Miss Honey
Education and Opportunity Theme Icon
The Power of Fighting Injustice Theme Icon
...if any students can spell “cat.” Matilda, a girl named Lavender, and a boy named Nigel put their hands up. Then, Miss Honey writes, “I have already begun to learn how... (full context)
Chapter 13. The Weekly Test
Adults, Children, and Power Theme Icon
The Power of Fighting Injustice Theme Icon
...to stand up and show her their hands; she wants to make sure they’re clean. Nigel’s hands aren’t clean enough, but he tries not to be afraid as Miss Trunchbull shouts... (full context)
Adults, Children, and Power Theme Icon
Education and Opportunity Theme Icon
To punish Nigel, Miss Trunchbull tells him to stand in the corner on one foot, facing the wall.... (full context)
Education and Opportunity Theme Icon
Women, Financial Security, and Ethics Theme Icon
...that Miss Honey wasted a whole class teaching the class to spell one word, but Nigel says the lesson only took three minutes because Miss Honey gives the class little songs... (full context)
Chapter 20. The Third Miracle
Adults, Children, and Power Theme Icon
The Power of Fighting Injustice Theme Icon
...the morning, Miss Honey checks in with the students who were physically harmed last time. Nigel says he wishes he were a grown-up—he’d knock Miss Trunchbull over. Miss Honey tells the... (full context)
Adults, Children, and Power Theme Icon
Family, Institutions, and Chosen Family Theme Icon
The Power of Fighting Injustice Theme Icon
Women, Financial Security, and Ethics Theme Icon
Just as the Trunchbull screams at Wilfred that eight threes is 24, Nigel screeches that the chalk is moving on its own. Everyone stares at the blackboard, where... (full context)
Adults, Children, and Power Theme Icon
The Power of Fighting Injustice Theme Icon
...the floor—and sure enough, she fainted. Miss Honey sends someone to fetch the matron, while Nigel notes that his father insists it’s best to pour water over someone who’s fainted. He... (full context)