Moneyball

Walter A. Haas, Jr. Character Analysis

The owner of the Oakland A’s from 1980 until his death in 1995, after which his family sold the team to new ownership. Haas ran the team in almost a philanthropic way, not worrying about losing money. Under his ownership the A’s made it to the World Series three years in a row (1988 – 1990), winning in 1989.

Walter A. Haas, Jr. Quotes in Moneyball

The Moneyball quotes below are all either spoken by Walter A. Haas, Jr. or refer to Walter A. Haas, Jr.. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Statistics and Rationality Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the W. W. Norton & Company edition of Moneyball published in 2004.
Chapter 3 Quotes

Since the late 1970s the A’s had been owned by Walter A. Haas, Jr., who was, by instinct, more of a philanthropist than a businessman. Haas viewed professional baseball ownership as a kind of public trust and spent money on it accordingly. In 1991, the Oakland A’s actually had the highest payroll in all of baseball. Haas was willing to lose millions to field a competitive team that would do Oakland proud, and he did. The A’s had gone to the World Series three straight seasons from 1988 to 1990.
Deferring to success became an untenable strategy in 1995.

Related Characters: Walter A. Haas, Jr.
Page Number: 57
Explanation and Analysis:
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Walter A. Haas, Jr. Character Timeline in Moneyball

The timeline below shows where the character Walter A. Haas, Jr. appears in Moneyball. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 3: The Enlightenment
Psychology and Talent Theme Icon
...through a series of major changes. Since the 70s, the team had been owned by Walter A. Haas , a wealthy philanthropist who believed that it was his job to “do Oakland proud”... (full context)