Stamped

by

Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi

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Segregationists Term Analysis

Segregationists are racists who think that different racial groups should be separate because certain racial groups are naturally better than others. Usually, they believe that white people are better than Black people, then use this idea to argue for racist policies like slavery, Jim Crow (racial segregation) laws, and mass incarceration of Black people.

Segregationists Quotes in Stamped

The Stamped quotes below are all either spoken by Segregationists or refer to Segregationists. For each quote, you can also see the other terms and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Racism vs. Antiracism Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Little, Brown Books for Young Readers edition of Stamped published in 2020.
Introduction Quotes

The segregationists and the assimilationists are challenged by antiracists. The antiracists say there is nothing wrong or right about Black people and everything wrong with racism. The antiracists say racism is the problem in need of changing, not Black people. The antiracists try to transform racism. The assimilationists try to transform Black people. The segregationists try to get away from Black people. These are the three distinct racial positions you will hear throughout Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You—the segregationists, the assimilationists, and the antiracists, and how they each have rationalized racial inequity.

Related Characters: Ibram X. Kendi (speaker)
Page Number: xiii
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 1 Quotes

Segregationists are haters. Like, real haters. People who hate you for not being like them. Assimilationists are people who like you, but only with quotation marks. Like…“like” you. Meaning, they “like” you because you’re like them. And then there are antiracists. They love you because you’re like you.

Related Characters: Jason Reynolds (speaker)
Page Number: Chapter 1: The Story of the World’s First Racist 3
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 8 Quotes

This three-fifths-of-a-man equation worked for both the assimilationists and the segregationists, because it fit right into the argument that slaves were both human and subhuman, which they both agreed on. For the assimilationists, the three-fifths rule allowed them to argue that someday slaves might be able to achieve five-fifths. Wholeness. Whiteness. One day. And for segregationists, it proved that slaves were mathematically wretched. Segregationists and assimilationists may have had different intentions, but both of them agreed that Black people were inferior. And that agreement, that shared bond, allowed slavery and racist ideas to be permanently stamped into the founding document of America.

Related Characters: Jason Reynolds (speaker)
Page Number: 61
Explanation and Analysis:
Afterword Quotes

[It all] leads back to the question of whether you, reader, want to be a segregationist (a hater), an assimilationist (a coward), or an antiracist (someone who truly loves).
Choice is yours.
Don’t freak out.
Just breathe in. Inhale. Hold it. Now exhale slowly:
N O W.

Related Characters: Jason Reynolds (speaker)
Page Number: 248
Explanation and Analysis:
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Segregationists Term Timeline in Stamped

The timeline below shows where the term Segregationists appears in Stamped. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Introduction
Racism vs. Antiracism Theme Icon
History and the Present Theme Icon
...inequities have always existed in the U.S., and three groups have always fought over them: segregationists, assimilationists, and antiracists. Segregationists and assimilationists blame Black people for inequity, while antiracists blame racism.... (full context)
Chapter 1: The Story of the World’s First Racist
Racism vs. Antiracism Theme Icon
History and the Present Theme Icon
...became this way in the U.S. This story has three main characters: the first is segregationists, who hate other racial groups. The second is assimilationists, who tolerate other groups, but only... (full context)
Chapter 8: Jefferson’s Notes
Racism vs. Antiracism Theme Icon
History and the Present Theme Icon
...by counting enslaved people. So, everyone agreed on three-fifths. This number satisfied both assimilationists and segregationists by arguing “that slaves were both human and subhuman.” Meanwhile, in Haiti, a group of... (full context)
Chapter 10: The Great Contradictor
Racism vs. Antiracism Theme Icon
Power, Profit, and Privilege Theme Icon
...up being the last people he ever saw. All in all, Jefferson was sometimes a segregationist and sometimes an assimilationist—but never an antiracist. (full context)
Chapter 21: When Death Comes
Racism vs. Antiracism Theme Icon
History and the Present Theme Icon
Power, Profit, and Privilege Theme Icon
 Segregationist Alabama governor George Wallace and anti-government conservative Barry Goldwater both tried to defeat President Lyndon... (full context)
Chapter 23: Murder Was the Case
Racism vs. Antiracism Theme Icon
History and the Present Theme Icon
How Racist Ideas Spread Theme Icon
Hoping to attract white racist voters, Richard Nixon ran for president on a segregationist platform, with a twist. Instead of saying “Black” and “white,” he used code words like... (full context)
Chapter 28: A Miracle and Still a Maybe
Racism vs. Antiracism Theme Icon
History and the Present Theme Icon
Power, Profit, and Privilege Theme Icon
How Racist Ideas Spread Theme Icon
...progress. But ultimately, under the pressure of governing, he became an assimilationist. During his presidency, segregationists attacked him relentlessly. (full context)
Afterword
Racism vs. Antiracism Theme Icon
History and the Present Theme Icon
Power, Profit, and Privilege Theme Icon
How Racist Ideas Spread Theme Icon
...Black people as animals through the media. But everyone can choose whether to be a segregationist, an assimilationist, or an antiracist. (full context)