Black Skin, White Masks

by

Frantz Fanon

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Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Grove Press edition of Black Skin, White Masks published in 2008.
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Introduction Quotes

All it needs is one simple answer and the black question would lose all relevance.
What does man want?
What does the black man want?
Running the risk of angering my black brothers, I shall say that a Black is not a man.

Related Characters: Frantz Fanon (speaker)
Page Number: xii
Explanation and Analysis:

Less commonly he [the “educated black man”] wants to feel part of his people. And with feverish lips and frenzied heart he plunges into the great black hole. We shall see that this wonderfully generous attitude rejects the present and future in the name of a mystical past.

Related Characters: Frantz Fanon (speaker)
Page Number: xviii
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 1 Quotes

All colonized people––in other words, people in whom an inferiority complex has taken root, whose local cultural originality has been committed to the grave––position themselves in relation to the civilizing language: i.e., the metropolitan culture.

Related Characters: Frantz Fanon (speaker)
Page Number: 2
Explanation and Analysis:

When an Antillean with a degree in philosophy says he is not sitting for the agrégation because of his color, my response is that philosophy never saved anybody. When another desperately tries to prove to me that the black man is as intelligent as any white man, my response is that neither did intelligence save anybody, for if equality among men is proclaimed in the name of intelligence and philosophy, it is also true that these concepts have been used to justify the extermination of man.

Related Characters: Frantz Fanon (speaker)
Page Number: 12
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 2 Quotes

Hatred is not a given; it is a struggle to acquire hatred, which has to be dragged into being, clashing with acknowledged guilt complexes. Hatred cries out to exist, and he who hates must prove his hatred through action and the appropriate behavior. In a sense he has to embody hatred.

Related Characters: Frantz Fanon (speaker)
Page Number: 35
Explanation and Analysis:

Both the black man, slave to his inferiority and the white man, slave to his superiority, behave along neurotic lines. As a consequence, we have been led to consider their alienation with reference to psychoanalytic descriptions.

Related Characters: Frantz Fanon (speaker)
Page Number: 42
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 3 Quotes

Out of the blackest part of my soul, through the zone of hachures, surges up this desire to be suddenly white.
I want to be recognized not as Black, but as White.
But––and this is the form of recognition that Hegel never described––who better than the white woman to bring this about? By loving me, she proves to me that I am worthy of a white love. I am loved like a white man.
I am a white man.

Related Characters: Frantz Fanon (speaker)
Page Number: 45
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 4 Quotes

I did not want to be objective. Besides, that would have been dishonest: I found it impossible to be objective.

Related Characters: Frantz Fanon (speaker), Octave Mannoni
Page Number: 67
Explanation and Analysis:

The Malagasy no longer exists… the Malagasy exists in relation to the European. When the white man arrived in Madagascar he disrupted the psychological horizon and mechanisms.

Related Characters: Frantz Fanon (speaker)
Page Number: 77
Explanation and Analysis:

The Frenchman does not like the Jew, who does not like the Arab, who does not like the black man. The Arab is told: 'If you are poor it's because the Jew has cheated you and robbed you of everything." The Jew is told: 'You're not of the same caliber as the Arab because in fact you are white and you have Bergson and Einstein." The black man is told: 'You are the finest soldiers in the French empire; the Arabs think they're superior to you, but they are wrong." Moreover, it's not true; they don’t say anything to the black man; they have nothing to say to him.

Related Characters: Frantz Fanon (speaker)
Page Number: 83
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 5 Quotes

I came into this world anxious to uncover the meaning of things, my soul desirous to be at the origin of the world, and here I am an object among other objects.

Related Characters: Frantz Fanon (speaker)
Page Number: 89
Explanation and Analysis:

Shame. Shame and self-contempt. Nausea. When they like me, they tell me my color has nothing to do with it. When they hate me, they add that it’s not because of my color. Either way, I am a prisoner of the vicious circle. I turn away from these prophets of doom and cling to my brothers, Negroes like myself. To my horror, they reject me. They are almost white. and then they'll probably marry a white woman and have slightly brown children. Who knows, gradually, perhaps . . .

Related Characters: Frantz Fanon (speaker)
Page Number: 96
Explanation and Analysis:

Two centuries ago, I was lost to humanity; I was a slave forever.

Related Characters: Frantz Fanon (speaker)
Page Number: 100
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 6 Quotes

In Europe and in every so-called civilized or civilizing country the family represents a piece of the nation. The child leaving the family environment finds the same laws, the same principles, and the same values. A normal child brought up in a normal family will become a normal adult. There is no disproportion between family life and the life of the nation.

Related Characters: Frantz Fanon (speaker)
Page Number: 121
Explanation and Analysis:

Since the racial drama is played out in the open, the black man has no time to "unconsciousnessize" it. The white man manages it to a certain degree because a new factor emerges: i.e., guilt. The black man's superiority or inferiority complex and his feeling of equality are conscious. He is constantly making them interact. He lives his drama. There is in him none of the affective amnesia characteristic of the typical neurotic.

Related Characters: Frantz Fanon (speaker)
Page Number: 129
Explanation and Analysis:

Still on the genital level, isn't the white man who hates Blacks prompted by a feeling of impotence or sexual inferiority? Since virility is taken to be the absolute ideal, doesn't he have a feeling of inadequacy in relation to the black man, who is viewed as a penis symbol? Isn't lynching the black man a sexual revenge? We know how sexualized torture, abuse, and ill-treatment can be. You only have to read a few pages of the marquis de Sade to be convinced. Is the black man's sexual superiority real? Everyone knows it isn't. But that is beside the point. The prelogical thought of the phobic has decided it is.

Related Characters: Frantz Fanon (speaker)
Page Number: 129
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 7 Quotes

The Antillean does not possess personal value of his own and is always dependent on the presence of "the Other." The question is always whether he is less intelligent than I, blacker than I, or less good than I. Every self-positioning or self-fixation maintains a relationship of dependency on the collapse of the other.

Related Characters: Frantz Fanon (speaker)
Page Number: 186
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 8 Quotes

Intellectual alienation is a creation of bourgeois society. And for me bourgeois society is any society that becomes ossified in a predetermined mold, stifling any development, progress, or discovery. For me bourgeois society is a closed society where it's not good to be alive, where the air is rotten and ideas and people are putrefying. And I believe that a man who takes a stand against this living death is in a way a revolutionary.

Related Characters: Frantz Fanon (speaker)
Page Number: 199
Explanation and Analysis:

My final prayer:
O my body, always make me a man who questions!

Related Characters: Frantz Fanon (speaker)
Page Number: 206
Explanation and Analysis:
No matches.