Firekeeper’s Daughter

Firekeeper’s Daughter

by

Angeline Boulley

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Anishinaabe/Nish/Anishinaabemowin

Anishinaabe translates to “Original People” (that is, Indigenous Americans in general), but Daunis explains that she and her peers usually use it to refer to the tribes that lived around the Great Lakes, such as… read analysis of Anishinaabe/Nish/Anishinaabemowin

Blanket Party

A blanket party is how Nish kwe get justice when a man mistreats a woman in the community. The woman’s cousins take the man into the woods rolled in a blanket and beat him. read analysis of Blanket Party

Miigwech

Miigwech is the Anishinaabemowin word for thank-you. read analysis of Miigwech

Nish Kwewag/Nish Kwe

Nish kwe is a shortened translation of “Anishinaabe woman.” Daunis prays daily to be a strong Nish kwe, like Auntie Teddie. read analysis of Nish Kwewag/Nish Kwe

Nokomis

Nokomis is the Anishinaabemowin word for grandmother. read analysis of Nokomis
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Ojibwe

Daunis is a member of the Sugar Island Ojibwe tribe. read analysis of Ojibwe

Per Cap

Per cap refers to the yearly payments that enrolled tribal members receive; the money comes from casino profits. Minors are eligible for payments, but they receive less than adults. Daunis explains that per cap can… read analysis of Per Cap

Semaa

Semaa is tobacco, which is given as an offering to elders, Creator, and other deities. read analysis of Semaa

Zhaaganaash

Zhaaganaash is the Anishinaabemowin word to refer to white people. read analysis of Zhaaganaash