The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

by

C. S. Lewis

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The rightful King of Narnia, Aslan is a talking lion of great and imposing stature. Aslan is so powerful that the mere mention of his name inspires strong feelings of terror and wonder in all who hear it; despite his great power, though, he is frequently absent from Narnia, and it is implied that he travels from world to world and realm to realm saving those in distress. Aslan is empathetic and kind, but his strong moral compass and decisive nature make him frightening, sometimes, to those who don’t know him very well. He ultimately sacrifices himself to the White Witch in Edmund’s place, and his death parallels the Passion and Crucifixion of Jesus Christ in the Christian Bible. Aslan is soon resurrected and helps Lucy, Susan, Edmund, and Peter restore harmony in the land.

Aslan Quotes in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

The The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe quotes below are all either spoken by Aslan or refer to Aslan. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Christian Allegory Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the HarperCollins edition of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe published in 1950.
Chapter 7 Quotes

“They say Aslan is on the move—perhaps has already landed.”

And now a very curious thing happened. None of the children knew who Aslan was any more than you do; but the moment the Beaver had spoken these words everyone felt quite different. Perhaps it has sometimes happened to you in a dream that someone says something which you don't understand but in the dream it feels as if it had some enormous meaning—either a terrifying one which turns the whole dream into a nightmare or else a lovely meaning too lovely to put into words, which makes the dream so beautiful that you remember it all your life and are always wishing you could get into that dream again. It was like that now. At the name of Aslan each one of the children felt something jump in its inside. Edmund felt a sensation of mysterious horror. Peter felt suddenly brave and adventurous. Susan felt as if some delicious smell or some delightful strain of music had just floated by her. And Lucy got the feeling you have when you wake up in the morning and realize that it is the beginning of the holidays or the beginning of summer.

Related Characters: Mr. Beaver (speaker), Lucy, Edmund, Susan, Peter, Aslan
Page Number: 67-68
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 8 Quotes

“Is he—quite safe? I shall feel rather nervous about meeting a lion.”

“That you will, dearie, and no mistake,” said Mrs. Beaver; “if there's anyone who can appear before Aslan without their knees knocking, they're either braver than most or else just silly.”

“Then he isn't safe?” said Lucy.

"Safe?” said Mr. Beaver; “don't you hear what Mrs. Beaver tells you? Who said anything about safe? 'Course he isn't safe. But he's good. He's the King, I tell you.”

“I'm longing to see him,” said Peter, “even if I do feel frightened when it comes to the point.”

[…]

“The quickest way you can help [Mr. Tumnus] is by going to meet Aslan,” said Mr. Beaver, “once he's with us, then we can begin doing things. Not that we don't need you too. For that's another of the old rhymes:

When Adam's flesh and Adam's bone Sits at Cair Paravel in throne,

The evil time will be over and done.

So things must be drawing near their end now he's come and you've come.”

Related Characters: Lucy (speaker), Susan (speaker), Peter (speaker), Mr. Beaver (speaker), Mrs. Beaver (speaker), Aslan, Mr. Tumnus
Page Number: 80-81
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 9 Quotes

You mustn't think that even now Edmund was quite so bad that he actually wanted his brother and sisters to be turned into stone. He did want Turkish Delight and to be a Prince (and later a King) and to pay Peter out for calling him a beast. As for what the Witch would do with the others, he didn't want her to be particularly nice to them—certainly not to put them on the same level as himself; but he managed to believe, or to pretend he believed, that she wouldn't do anything very bad to them, “Because,” he said to himself, “all these people who say nasty things about her are her enemies and probably half of it isn't true. She was jolly nice to me, anyway, much nicer than they are. I expect she is the rightful Queen really. Anyway, she'll be better than that awful Aslan!” At least, that was the excuse he made in his own mind for what he was doing. It wasn't a very good excuse, however, for deep down inside him he really knew that the White Witch was bad and cruel.

Related Characters: Edmund (speaker), Lucy, Susan, Peter, Aslan, The White Witch / The Queen
Page Number: 89
Explanation and Analysis:

And he stood there gloating over the stone lion, and presently he did something very silly and childish. He took a stump of lead pencil out of his pocket and scribbled a moustache on the lion's upper lip and then a pair of spectacles on its eyes. Then he said, “Yah! Silly old Aslan! How do you like being a stone? You thought yourself mighty fine, didn't you?” But in spite of the scribbles on it the face of the great stone beast still looked so terrible, and sad, and noble, staring up in the moonlight, that Edmund didn't really get any fun out of jeering at it. He turned away and began to cross the courtyard.

Related Characters: Edmund (speaker), Aslan, The White Witch / The Queen
Page Number: 96
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 12 Quotes

But as for Aslan himself, the Beavers and the children didn't know what to do or say when they saw him. People who have not been in Narnia sometimes think that a thing cannot be good and terrible at the same time. If the children had ever thought so, they were cured of it now. For when they tried to look at Aslan's face they just caught a glimpse of the golden mane and the great, royal, solemn, overwhelming eyes; and then they found they couldn't look at him and went all trembly.

Related Characters: Lucy, Susan, Peter, Aslan, Mr. Beaver, Mrs. Beaver
Page Number: 126
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 14 Quotes

At last the rabble had had enough of this. They began to drag the bound and muzzled Lion to the Stone Table, some pulling and some pushing. He was so huge that even when they got him there it took all their efforts to hoist him onto the surface of it. Then there was more tying and tightening of cords.

“The cowards! The cowards!” sobbed Susan. “Are they still afraid of him, even now?”

Related Characters: Susan (speaker), Lucy, Aslan, The White Witch / The Queen
Page Number: 154
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 15 Quotes

As soon as the wood was silent again Susan and Lucy crept out onto the open hilltop. The moon was getting low and thin clouds were passing across her, but still they could see the shape of the Lion lying dead in his bonds. And down they both knelt in the wet grass and kissed his cold face and stroked his beautiful fur—what was left of it—and cried till they could cry no more. And then they looked at each other and held each other’s hands for mere loneliness and cried again; and then again were silent.

Related Characters: Lucy, Susan, Aslan
Page Number: 157
Explanation and Analysis:

“Oh, you're real, you're real! Oh, Aslan!” cried Lucy, and both girls flung themselves upon him and covered him with kisses.

“But what does it all mean?” asked Susan when they were somewhat calmer.

“It means,” said Aslan, “that though the Witch knew the Deep Magic, there is a magic deeper still which she did not know. Her knowledge goes back only to the dawn of time. But if she could have looked a little further back, into the stillness and the darkness before Time dawned, she would have read there a different incantation. She would have known that when a willing victim who had committed no treachery was killed in a traitor's stead, the Table would crack and Death itself would start working backward. And now—”

“Oh yes. Now?” said Lucy, jumping up and clapping her hands.

“Oh, children,” said the Lion, “I feel my strength coming back to me.”

Related Characters: Lucy (speaker), Susan (speaker), Aslan (speaker), The White Witch / The Queen
Page Number: 163
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 16 Quotes

“And now! Those who can't keep up—that is, children, dwarfs, and small animals—must ride on the backs of those who can—that is, lions, centaurs, unicorns, horses, giants and eagles. Those who are good with their noses must come in the front with us lions to smell out where the battle is. Look lively and sort yourselves.”

And with a great deal of bustle and cheering they did. The most pleased of the lot was the other lion who kept running about everywhere pretending to be very busy but really in order to say to everyone he met, “Did you hear what he said? Us Lions—That means him and me. Us Lions. That's what I like about Aslan. No side, no stand-off-ishness. Us Lions. That meant him and me.”

Related Characters: Aslan (speaker)
Page Number: 174
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 17 Quotes

“It was all Edmund's doing, Aslan,” Peter was saying. “We'd have been beaten if it hadn't been for him. The Witch was turning our troops into stone right and left. But nothing would stop him. He fought his way through three ogres to where she was just turning one of your leopards into a statue. And when he reached her he had sense to bring his sword smashing down on her wand in- stead of trying to go for her directly and simply getting made a statue himself for his pains. That was the mistake all the rest were making. Once her wand was broken we began to have some chance—if we hadn't lost so many already. He was terribly wounded. We must go and see him.”

Related Characters: Peter (speaker), Edmund, Aslan, The White Witch / The Queen
Page Number: 178-179
Explanation and Analysis:
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Aslan Character Timeline in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

The timeline below shows where the character Aslan appears in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 7: A Day with the Beavers
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...that he can whisper to them; once they are close enough, he tells them that “Aslan is on the move.” (full context)
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At the mention of the name Aslan, though they do not yet know who he is, the children all feel “quite different.”... (full context)
Chapter 8: What Happened after Dinner
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...come back out alive. The best thing they can do, he says, is wait for Aslan to arrive. (full context)
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Susan asks who Aslan is, and Mr. Beaver explains that Aslan is the King—the Lord of the whole wood.... (full context)
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Mr. Beaver tells the children they’ll understand Aslan’s power when they finally meet him. Lucy asks if Aslan is a man—Mr. Beaver reveals... (full context)
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Mr. Beaver tells the children that their only chance now is Aslan, and suggests they get on their way to the Stone Table. Mrs. Beaver realizes, though,... (full context)
Chapter 9: In the Witch’s House
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...Witch’s Turkish Delight—the enchanted food had ruined his taste for ordinary food. After hearing about Aslan and the Stone Table, Edmund slipped away from the dinner table, feeling the same “mysterious... (full context)
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...there—there is even a stone lion, and Edmund believes that the Witch has already caught Aslan and turned him to stone. Edmund takes a bit of lead from his pocket and... (full context)
Chapter 10: The Spell Begins to Break
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...he has at last gotten into Narnia—the Witch’s magic, he says, is weakening now that Aslan is on the move. (full context)
Chapter 11: Aslan is Nearer
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...the chattering of birds. The Witch’s driver laments that this sudden coming of spring is “Aslan’s doing,” but the Witch warns him—and Edmund—that if either of them speaks Aslan’s name again,... (full context)
Chapter 12: Peter’s First Battle
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...spring, and realize that the thaw must mean that the Witch’s powers are diminishing as Aslan approaches. (full context)
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...hear the sound of music to their right and turn to face it; they see Aslan in the center of a crowd of creatures which includes Dryads, Naiads, unicorns, and various... (full context)
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Peter bravely approaches Aslan, and Aslan greets Peter, Susan, Lucy, Mr. Beaver and Mrs. Beaver warmly. His voice has... (full context)
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While Lucy and Susan are whisked away to be prepared for dinner, Aslan brings Peter to a high ridge where he can see the country he will soon... (full context)
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Chaos has broken out at the Stone Table, and members of Aslan’s army are scattered in every direction. Lucy runs towards Peter with fear; Susan is being... (full context)
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First, though, Aslan beckons Peter to him. He instructs Peter to wipe his sword clean of the wolf’s... (full context)
Chapter 13: Deep Magic from the Dawn of Time
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...The Witch and the Dwarf decide to keep Edmund as a hostage to bargain with Aslan and his forces. The Witch jeeringly states that Aslan will be forced to “rescue” Edmund,... (full context)
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A wolf approaches the Witch and informs her that Aslan and the three humans are at the Stone Table; Maugrim, he says, has been killed.... (full context)
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...brought back to camp in the middle of the night, and is presently conversing with Aslan. The children eat breakfast and then go out to find Edmund—Aslan is with him, and... (full context)
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A leopard approaches Aslan and tells him that a messenger from the “enemy” wants an audience with him. The... (full context)
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A few minutes later, the Witch walks into camp and stands before Aslan. The spring air suddenly grows cold. The Witch informs Aslan that he has a traitor... (full context)
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Aslan instructs the children and his other attendants to fall back and let him talk to... (full context)
Chapter 14: The Triumph of the Witch
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As soon as the Witch leaves, Aslan tells everyone that it is time to move away from the Stone Table—it will soon... (full context)
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...they reach their new encampment and begin to unpack, Susan and Lucy notice how sad Aslan looks. Indeed, as the camp comes together, Aslan’s poor mood begins affecting everyone, and that... (full context)
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Susan and Lucy creep out of their tent and see Aslan walking away into the wood. They decide to follow him, and are surprised when they... (full context)
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Susan and Lucy beg Aslan to tell them what’s the matter; he replies only that he is sad and lonely.... (full context)
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Susan and Lucy hide in the bushes and watch as Aslan approaches a great crowd standing around the Stone Table. It is a crowd of the... (full context)
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At last, the Witch’s minions drag Aslan up onto the Stone Table. The Witch sharpens her knife, and then approaches Aslan. She... (full context)
Chapter 15: Deeper Magic from Before the Dawn of Time
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...to look at the table, and find that it has cracked from end to end; Aslan’s body is gone. The girls begin to cry, fearing that the Witch’s minions returned for... (full context)
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Aslan has been restored to life—his mane has grown back, and he looks stronger than ever.... (full context)
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Aslan rejoices in having regained his strength, and begins running and leaping around the hill. Susan... (full context)
Chapter 16: What Happened about the Statues
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As Susan and Lucy marvel at the statues, Aslan goes around the courtyard breathing on each one. Slowly, the statues begin coming back to... (full context)
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Lucy finds Mr. Tumnus, and Aslan breathes on him and restores him to life; Lucy and Tumnus rejoice at being reunited,... (full context)
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Aslan then claps his paws together and calls for silence; he tells his followers that they... (full context)
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Eventually, Aslan and his followers come upon Peter, Edmund, and the rest of their army in a... (full context)
Chapter 17: The Hunting of the White Stag
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The battle is over rather quickly—Aslan’s army’s first charge kills most of his enemies, and when those still living see that... (full context)
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Lucy attends to the wounded while Aslan restores those who have been turned to stone. When Lucy at last returns to Edmund’s... (full context)
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That night, the siblings and the rest of their troops sleep on the battlefield—Aslan miraculously provides food for everyone. The next morning, everyone marches east to Cair Paravel, and... (full context)
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...Mrs. Beaver. That night, there is a great feast, and while it is raging on, Aslan slips away. Mr. Beaver assures the worried children that Aslan often comes and goes—he “doesn’t... (full context)
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...Queens, they decide, they should not be afraid. They proceed onward “in the name of Aslan,” and as they go, they soon find themselves making their way “not through branches but... (full context)