The Invisible Man

by

H. G. Wells

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The Invisible Man: Chapter 11 Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
The narrator goes back to explain what led up Marvel’s flight from the inn. Huxter first saw Marvel at a moment when Cuss and Bunting were discussing the strange events of the morning in Griffin’s room. Mr. Hall had given them permission to search Griffin’s belongings; almost immediately after beginning the search, Cuss found three large notebooks labeled “Diary.” Cuss was initially excited, convinced that the diary would help them learn about Griffin, however he was disappointed to learn that the entire thing was written in “cipher” (code). Cuss concluded that while some of it was “mathematical,” other parts were written in Russian and Greek.
Having learned about Griffin’s invisibility, the villagers are now determined to figure Griffin out for themselves. However, they are not equipped with the scientific education necessary to understand the items in his room. The fact that his notebooks are written in code represents the lack of access ordinary people often have to science and technology.
Themes
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
The Future vs. the Past Theme Icon
Skepticism vs. Belief Theme Icon
Humans, Science, and Nature Theme Icon
As a vicar, Bunting is supposed to know Greek, but he has forgotten most of it and is embarrassed to admit this. At that moment, the door suddenly opened to reveal Marvel, who on seeing the other men pretended that he was lost. Marvel closes the door on his way out, and Cuss and Bunting are left alone again. Someone sniffs. The two men discuss whether or not Griffin is really invisible. Cuss suggests that Bunting return to examining the Greek, and Bunting does so reluctantly. Suddenly, a voice says: “Don’t move, little men… or I’ll brain you both!” The voice curses the men for their invasion of privacy.
The people of Iping may be rather simple and ordinary, but they are also prideful. Both Mrs. Hall and Rev. Bunting are keen to ensure that other people think they are smart—hence Bunting’s embarrassment over his inability to read Greek. Of course, Griffin plays into these insecurities by patronizingly calling Cuss and Bunting “little men.” It’s assumed that Griffin enters the room when Marvel opens the door, pretending to be lost.
Themes
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
The Future vs. the Past Theme Icon
Humans, Science, and Nature Theme Icon
The voice (Griffin) tells Cuss and Bunting that he has locked the windows and door. He adds that because he is invisible, he could easily kill them and get away with it, so they shouldn’t “try any nonsense.” Griffin points the fire poker at each of the men’s faces and tells them that he can’t find his clothes. He says that he needs his clothes, “other accommodation,” and the three notebooks they are holding.
Again, Griffin is shown to be completely shameless in his attitude toward morality, crime, and punishment. His boast that he could easily get away with murder is arguably a sign of hubris. In making such a claim, Griffin is overestimating his own power.
Themes
Freedom, Anonymity, and Immorality Theme Icon
Greed and Self-Interest Theme Icon
Skepticism vs. Belief Theme Icon
Humans, Science, and Nature Theme Icon