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A narrow Fellow in the Grass Summary & Analysis
by Emily Dickinson

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Emily Dickinson's 1865 poem "A narrow Fellow in the Grass" uses the image of an encounter with a snake to explore the nature of fear and anxiety—especially the fear of deceit. Like the proverbial "snake in the grass," this snake is a creature of secretive, treacherous menace. This is one of Dickinson's most famous poems, and one of the few published during her lifetime—though that publication was anonymous, and she didn't approve the publisher's edits (especially not the addition of a title, "The Snake," which really gives the game away). It's a great example of her characteristic style, including her use of common meter, slant rhyme, and powerful dashes.

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