A line-by-line translation

As You Like It

As You Like It Translation Act 2, Scene 4

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Enter ROSALIND for Ganymede, CELIA for Aliena, and TOUCHSTONE

ROSALIND

O Jupiter, how weary are my spirits!

ROSALIND

Oh Jove, my spirit is worn out!

TOUCHSTONE

I care not for my spirits, if my legs were not weary.

TOUCHSTONE

I wouldn't care about my spirit, if my legs weren't so tired.

ROSALIND

I could find in my heart to disgrace my man’s apparel and to cry like a woman, but I must comfort the weaker vessel, as doublet and hose ought to show itself courageous to petticoat. Therefore courage, good Aliena.

ROSALIND

I could insult my manly clothes by crying like a woman. But instead I must comfort my weaker feminine side, just as the man's jacket and breeches must act brave for the woman's petticoat. Therefore have courage, good Aliena.

CELIA

I pray you bear with me. I cannot go no further.

CELIA

Please bear with me. I can't go any further.

TOUCHSTONE

For my part, I had rather bear with you than bear you. Yet I should bear no cross if I did bear you, for I think you have no money in your purse.

TOUCHSTONE

As for me, I'd rather bear with you than bear you. But if I did carry you it would be no cross to bear, because I think you have no money in your purse.

ROSALIND

Well, this is the Forest of Arden.

ROSALIND

Well, this is the Forest of Arden.

TOUCHSTONE

Ay, now am I in Arden, the more fool I. When I was at homeI was in a better place, but travelers must be content.

TOUCHSTONE

Yes, now I am in Arden, which makes me even more of a fool. When I was at home, I was in a better place. But travelers must be content with what they can get.

ROSALIND

Ay, be so, good Touchstone.

ROSALIND

Yes, be content, good Touchstone.

Enter CORIN and SILVIUS

Look you who comes here, a young man and an old in solemn talk.

Look who's coming this way—a young man and an old man having a serious discussion.

CORIN

That is the way to make her scorn you still.

CORIN

That's only going to make her keep scorning you.

SILVIUS

O Corin, that thou knew’st how I do love her!

SILVIUS

Oh, Corin, if you only knew how much I love her!

CORIN

I partly guess, for I have loved ere now.

CORIN

I can probably guess, as I have been in love before.

SILVIUS

No, Corin, being old, thou canst not guess, Though in thy youth thou wast as true a lover As ever sighed upon a midnight pillow. But if thy love were ever like to mine— As sure I think did never man love so— How many actions most ridiculous Hast thou been drawn to by thy fantasy?

SILVIUS

No, Corin, being old, you cannot guess—even if in your youth you were as true a lover as ever sighed into your pillow all night long. But if your love was anything like mine—and I'm sure that no man has ever loved as I do—tell me how many ridiculous actions did your desires lead you to perform?

CORIN

Into a thousand that I have forgotten.

CORIN

A thousand, but I have forgotten them all.

SILVIUS

Oh, thou didst then ne'er love so heartily. If thou rememb’rest not the slightest folly That ever love did make thee run into, Thou hast not loved. Or if thou hast not sat as I do now, Wearying thy hearer in thy mistress’s praise, Thou hast not loved. Or if thou hast not broke from company Abruptly, as my passion now makes me, Thou hast not loved. O Phoebe, Phoebe, Phoebe!

SILVIUS

Oh, then you never loved as fully as I do. If you cannot remember even the smallest foolish act that love drove you to, then you have not loved. Or if you have not sat as I do now, wearying your listener with the praise of your beloved, then you have not loved. Or if you have not broken away from all company, as my passion now leads me to do, then you have not loved. Oh Phoebe, Phoebe, Phoebe!

Exit

ROSALIND

Alas, poor shepherd, searching of thy wound, I have by hard adventure found mine own.

ROSALIND

Alas, poor shepherd, hearing you describe your injured heart has reminded me of my own lovelorn suffering.

TOUCHSTONE

And I mine. I remember when I was in love I broke my sword upon a stone and bid him take that for coming a- night to Jane Smile. And I remember the kissing of her batler, and the cow’s dugs that her pretty chpped hands had milked. And I remember the wooing of a peascod instead of her, from whom I took two cods and, giving her them again, said with weeping tears, “Wear these formy sake.” We that are true lovers run into strange capers. But as all is mortal in nature, so is all naturein love mortal in folly.

TOUCHSTONE

And mine as well. I remember when I was in love, I broke my sword upon a stone and told the sword to "take that" for coming at night to visit Jane Smile. And I remember kissing Jane's washing stick, and the cow's udders that her pretty chapped hands had milked. And I remember wooing a peapod, and taking two peas from it and giving them to her, and tearfully asking her to "Wear these for my sake." We who are true lovers do many strange things. But just as everything in nature is mortal, so all lovers show their humanity through their foolishness.

ROSALIND

Thou speak’st wiser than thou art ware of.

ROSALIND

Your words are wiser than you are aware of.

TOUCHSTONE

Nay, I shall ne'er be ware of mine own wit till I breakmy shins against it.

TOUCHSTONE

No, I will never be aware of my own wit, until I break my shins against it.

ROSALIND

Jove, Jove, this shepherd’s passionIs much upon my fashion.

ROSALIND

Jove, Jove, this shepherd's passion is much like my own.

TOUCHSTONE

And mine, but it grows something stale with me.

TOUCHSTONE

And mine too, but I am getting somewhat tired of it.

CELIA

I pray you, one of you question yond man, if he for gold will give us any food. I faint almost to death.

CELIA

Please, one of you go ask that man if he will sell us any food for gold. I am fainting almost to death with hunger.

TOUCHSTONE

[to CORIN] Holla, you clown!

TOUCHSTONE

[To CORIN] Hey, you clown!

ROSALIND

Peace, fool. He’s not thy kinsman.

ROSALIND

Quiet, you fool. He's not a clown like you.

CORIN

Who calls?

CORIN

Who calls?

TOUCHSTONE

Your betters, sir.

TOUCHSTONE

Your superior, sir.

CORIN

Else are they very wretched.

CORIN

If they weren't my superiors, they would have to be very wretched.

ROSALIND

Peace, I say. —Good even to you, friend.

ROSALIND

[To TOUCHSTONE] Quiet, I say. 

[To CORIN] Good evening to you, friend.

CORIN

And to you, gentle sir, and to you all.

CORIN

And to you, noble sir, and to you all.

ROSALIND

I prithee, shepherd, if that love or gold Can in this desert place buy entertainment, Bring us where we may rest ourselves and feed. Here’s a young maid with travel much oppressed, And faints for succor.

ROSALIND

Please, shepherd, if kindness or gold can buy food and lodging in this uninhabited place, lead us to where we can rest ourselves and eat. With us here is a young lady who is very weary from traveling and faint with hunger.

CORIN

Fair sir, I pity her And wish, for her sake more than for mine own, My fortunes were more able to relieve her. But I am shepherd to another man And do not shear the fleeces that I graze. My master is of churlish disposition And little recks to find the way to heaven By doing deeds of hospitality. Besides, his cote, his flocks, and bounds of feed Are now on sale, and at our sheepcote now, By reason of his absence, there is nothing That you will feed on. But what is, come see, And in my voice most welcome shall you be.

CORIN

Good-looking sir, I pity her and wish, for her sake more than my own, that I was better able to help her. But I am the hired shepherd of another man, and I do not shear the wool from the sheep I tend. My master is a stingy man and doesn't care to get to heaven by doing things that are hospitable. Besides, his cottage, his flocks, and his pastures are now for sale. And because he's away right now, there's nothing to eat at our cottage. But let's see what we can find, and as far as I have any influence, you will be most welcome.

ROSALIND

What is he that shall buy his flock and pasture?

ROSALIND

Who is the person who wants to buy the flock and pasture?

CORIN

That young swain that you saw here but erewhile, That little cares for buying anything.

CORIN

That young shepherd you saw here just a little while ago, but in truth he hardly cares about buying anything.

ROSALIND

I pray thee, if it stand with honesty,Buy thou the cottage, pasture, and the flock,And thou shalt have to pay for it of us.

ROSALIND

I ask you—if it can be honorably done—please buy the cottage, the pasture, and the flock, and we will give you the money to pay for it.

CELIA

And we will mend thy wages. I like this place, And willingly could waste my time in it.

CELIA

And we will improve your wages. I like this place, and would willingly spend my time here.

CORIN

Assuredly the thing is to be sold. Go with me. If you like upon report The soil, the profit, and this kind of life, I will your very faithful feeder be And buy it with your gold right suddenly.

CORIN

The thing will certainly be sold. Come with me. If you like what you see of the land, its potential profit, and this shepherd's life, then I will be your faithful servant and buy it with your gold immediately.

Exeunt

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Matt cosby
About the Translator: Matt Cosby
Matt Cosby graduated from Amherst College in 2011, and currently works as a writer and editor for LitCharts. He is from Florida but now lives in Portland, Oregon, where he also makes art, plays the piano, and goes to dog parks.