The Count of Monte Cristo

The Count of Monte Cristo

by

Alexandre Dumas

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The King of France at the start of the novel, “restored” to the throne after the French Revolution and the first reign of Napoleon Bonaparte. Louis XVII is portrayed in the text as an overeducated and distant ruler, who is not aware of Napoleon’s return to France until it is too late to repel him at the border.

Louis XVIII Quotes in The Count of Monte Cristo

The The Count of Monte Cristo quotes below are all either spoken by Louis XVIII or refer to Louis XVIII. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Justice, Revenge, and God’s Will Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin edition of The Count of Monte Cristo published in 2003.
Chapter 12 Quotes

The king! I thought him enough of a philosopher to realize that there is no such thing as murder in politics. You know as well as I do, my dear boy, that in politics there are no people, only ideas; no feelings, only interests. In politics, you don’t kill a man, you remove an obstacle, that’s all.

Related Characters: M. de Noirtier-Villefort (speaker), M. de Villefort, Louis XVIII
Page Number: 107
Explanation and Analysis:
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Louis XVIII Character Timeline in The Count of Monte Cristo

The timeline below shows where the character Louis XVIII appears in The Count of Monte Cristo. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 6 – The Deputy Crown Prosecutor
Justice, Revenge, and God’s Will Theme Icon
Changes of Identity and Station Theme Icon
Love, Devotion, and Redemption Theme Icon
Debt and Gratitude Theme Icon
...parents are a Marquis and Marquise, both of whom are ardent Royalists – supporters of Louis XVIII, who currently rules in Paris in 1815. They are also opponents of Bonaparte, who... (full context)
Chapter 9 – The Evening of the Betrothal
Justice, Revenge, and God’s Will Theme Icon
Changes of Identity and Station Theme Icon
Debt and Gratitude Theme Icon
The Domestic and the Foreign Theme Icon
...the king. He asks Saint-Meran to arrange for him to have a private audience with Louis XVIII “post-haste.” This is a way, it is hinted, of demonstrating that Villefort has just... (full context)
Chapter 10 – The Little Cabinet in the Tuileries
Changes of Identity and Station Theme Icon
The Domestic and the Foreign Theme Icon
The narrator describes Villefort’s arrival at the Tuileries, where Louis XVIII has been half-heartedly reading Horace to himself and listening to his courtiers discuss the... (full context)
Changes of Identity and Station Theme Icon
The Domestic and the Foreign Theme Icon
Villefort is brought in to speak to the king. He tells Louis, falsely, that the man he has recently arrested and imprisoned was part of a larger... (full context)
Chapter 11 – The Corsican Ogre
Justice, Revenge, and God’s Will Theme Icon
Changes of Identity and Station Theme Icon
The Domestic and the Foreign Theme Icon
...the innocent Dantes. But Villefort, able and adroit, seizes on the moment and begins offering Louis XVIII military advice. Louis tells the courtiers, who are shocked at this young man’s instant... (full context)
Justice, Revenge, and God’s Will Theme Icon
Changes of Identity and Station Theme Icon
The Domestic and the Foreign Theme Icon
Louis is enraged that his ministers, including the Minister of Police, who is now present, were... (full context)
Justice, Revenge, and God’s Will Theme Icon
Changes of Identity and Station Theme Icon
The Domestic and the Foreign Theme Icon
Louis dismisses the men and sends Villefort back to Marseille, where he can be “of service”... (full context)
Chapter 13 – The Hundred Days
Justice, Revenge, and God’s Will Theme Icon
Changes of Identity and Station Theme Icon
The Domestic and the Foreign Theme Icon
...Waterloo, known as the Hundred Days. When Napoleon ascends to the throne again, and after Louis XVIII has fled with his Royalists, Morrel believes that he can once again plead his... (full context)
Justice, Revenge, and God’s Will Theme Icon
Love, Devotion, and Redemption Theme Icon
Debt and Gratitude Theme Icon
...keeps this letter as “proof” that Dantes was a Bonapartist—this will be useful when, inevitably, Louis XVIII returns to power. Thus, his defeat of Dantes will be total and irrevocable. (full context)
Justice, Revenge, and God’s Will Theme Icon
Changes of Identity and Station Theme Icon
The Domestic and the Foreign Theme Icon
...she depends upon him for help—although their relationship is still friendly and not romantic. Once Louis XVIII is restored, Dantes’ father, convinced there is no hope at all for Dantes, dies.... (full context)
Chapter 75 – The Judicial Inquiry
Justice, Revenge, and God’s Will Theme Icon
Changes of Identity and Station Theme Icon
Debt and Gratitude Theme Icon
...ago, when Villefort and his father met in Paris just after Villefort’s successful audience with Louis XVIII. (full context)