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Henry VI, Part 3

Henry VI, Part 3 Translation Act 4, Scene 7

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Flourish. Enter KING EDWARD IV, GLOUCESTER, HASTINGS, and Soldiers

KING EDWARD IV

Now, brother Richard, Lord Hastings, and the rest, Yet thus far fortune maketh us amends, And says that once more I shall interchange My waned state for Henry's regal crown. Well have we pass'd and now repass'd the seas And brought desired help from Burgundy: What then remains, we being thus arrived From Ravenspurgh haven before the gates of York, But that we enter, as into our dukedom?

KING EDWARD IV

Now brother Richard, Lord Hastings and all of you: up until these gates, fortune has been repaying what it took from me. I believe the fates will allow me to trade in my diminished position for Henry's kingly crown. We've gone back and forth over the seas and brought the help we wanted from Burgundy. Now that we've traveled from Ravenspurgh haven and arrived in front of the gates of York, what is there to do besides enter our dukedom of York?

GLOUCESTER

The gates made fast! Brother, I like not this;For many men that stumble at the thresholdAre well foretold that danger lurks within.

GLOUCESTER

The gates are tightly secured. I don't like this, brother. If you stumble over the threshold of a door, it's usually an omen that there's danger lurking inside. 

KING EDWARD IV

Tush, man, abodements must not now affright us:By fair or foul means we must enter in,For hither will our friends repair to us.

KING EDWARD IV

Oh, come on, man! Omens won't scare us. We must get in by hook or by crook because our friends will rejoin us here when we're inside. 

HASTINGS

My liege, I'll knock once more to summon them.

HASTINGS

My lord, I'll knock one more time to call them.

Enter, on the walls, the Mayor of York, and his Brethren

MAYOR

My lords, we were forewarned of your coming,And shut the gates for safety of ourselves;For now we owe allegiance unto Henry.

MAYOR

My lords, we were warned about you coming here, and we closed the gates to protect ourselves. Now we are loyal to Henry. 

KING EDWARD IV

But, master mayor, if Henry be your king,Yet Edward at the least is Duke of York.

KING EDWARD IV

But, mayor, if Henry is your king, then I, Edward, am still at least the Duke of York.

MAYOR

True, my good lord; I know you for no less.

MAYOR

True, my good lord. I know that to be your title. 

KING EDWARD IV

Why, and I challenge nothing but my dukedom,As being well content with that alone.

KING EDWARD IV

Well, I'm insisting on nothing except being recognized as the duke, and I'll be perfectly happy with just that alone.  

GLOUCESTER

[Aside] But when the fox hath once got in his nose,He'll soon find means to make the body follow.

GLOUCESTER

[To himself] But once the fox has poked his nose inside the chicken coop, he'll soon figure out a way to get his whole body inside too. 

HASTINGS

Why, master mayor, why stand you in a doubt?Open the gates; we are King Henry's friends.

HASTINGS

Why are you hesitating, mayor? Open the gates, we are King Henry's friends.

MAYOR

Ay, say you so? The gates shall then be open'd.

MAYOR

Oh, are you, you say? Then we'll open the gates.

They descend

GLOUCESTER

A wise stout captain, and soon persuaded!

GLOUCESTER

He is a wise, brave leader to be so easily persuaded of our loyalty!

HASTINGS

The good old man would fain that all were well,So 'twere not 'long of him; but being enter'd,I doubt not, I, but we shall soon persuadeBoth him and all his brothers unto reason.

HASTINGS

The good old man just wants the conflicts to be resolved so that he doesn't have to deal with it. But once we're in, I'm sure we shall quickly persuade him and his followers to listen to reason. 

Enter the Mayor and two Aldermen, below

KING EDWARD IV

So, master mayor: these gates must not be shutBut in the night or in the time of war.What! Fear not, man, but yield me up the keys;

KING EDWARD IV

So, mayor, these gates should only be closed during the night or during wartime. Relax! Don't be scared—just give me the keys. 

Takes his keys

KING EDWARD IV

For Edward will defend the town and thee,And all those friends that deign to follow me.

KING EDWARD IV

Edward will defend you, your town, and all those friends of yours that decide to follow me.

March. Enter MONTGOMERY, with drum and soldiers

GLOUCESTER

Brother, this is Sir John Montgomery,Our trusty friend, unless I be deceived.

GLOUCESTER

Brother, this is Sir John Montgomery. He is our trusted friend, unless he is deceiving me. 

KING EDWARD IV

Welcome, Sir John! But why come you in arms?

KING EDWARD IV

Welcome, Sir John! But why do you come with armed soldiers?

MONTAGUE

To help King Edward in his time of storm,As every loyal subject ought to do.

MONTAGUE

To help King Edward in this time of crisis, as every loyal subject should.

KING EDWARD IV

Thanks, good Montgomery; but we now forgetOur title to the crown and only claimOur dukedom till God please to send the rest.

KING EDWARD IV

Thanks, good Montgomery, but I've now cast aside my claim to the throne and only declare myself the Duke of York until God chooses to give me back my kingship. 

MONTAGUE

Then fare you well, for I will hence again:I came to serve a king and not a duke.Drummer, strike up, and let us march away.

MONTAGUE

Then goodbye, because I will leave again. I came to serve a king, not a duke. Drummer, start playing, and let's march away.

The drum begins to march

KING EDWARD IV

Nay, stay, Sir John, awhile, and we'll debateBy what safe means the crown may be recover'd.

KING EDWARD IV

No, stay here a while, Sir John, and we can debate how the crown might be won back securely. 

MONTAGUE

What talk you of debating? In few words, If you'll not here proclaim yourself our king, I'll leave you to your fortune and be gone To keep them back that come to succor you: Why shall we fight, if you pretend no title?

MONTAGUE

Why do you talk about debating it? Let me put it bluntly: if you won't declare yourself our king, I'll leave you to your own devices and will take away these men who have come to support you. Why should we fight for you if you don't claim to have a right to the throne?

GLOUCESTER

Why, brother, wherefore stand you on nice points?

GLOUCESTER

Brother, why are you quibbling over minor issues?

KING EDWARD IV

When we grow stronger, then we'll make our claim:Till then, 'tis wisdom to conceal our meaning.

KING EDWARD IV

When my army has grown stronger, then I'll make my claim to be the rightful king. Until then, it's wise to hide my intentions.

HASTINGS

Away with scrupulous wit! Now arms must rule.

HASTINGS

Enough with the overcautious overthinking! Battles must decide what happens next now. 

GLOUCESTER

And fearless minds climb soonest unto crowns.Brother, we will proclaim you out of hand:The bruit thereof will bring you many friends.

GLOUCESTER

And fearless men ascend most quickly the throne. Brother, we will claim your kingship immediately, and the news of that will bring you many friends.

KING EDWARD IV

Then be it as you will; for 'tis my right,And Henry but usurps the diadem.

KING EDWARD IV

Then do what you think best. It is my right after all and Henry only usurps the crown.

MONTAGUE

Ay, now my sovereign speaketh like himself;And now will I be Edward's champion.

MONTAGUE

Yes, now my king speaks like himself. Now I will fight for Edward. 

HASTINGS

Sound trumpet; Edward shall be here proclaim'd:Come, fellow-soldier, make thou proclamation.

HASTINGS

Sound the trumpet. Edward will be proclaimed king here and now. Come, soldier, you make the announcement.

Flourish

SOLDIER

Edward the Fourth, by the grace of God, king ofEngland and France, and lord of Ireland, & c.

SOLDIER

Edward the Fourth, by the grace of God, you are the king of England and France, and Lord of Ireland, et cetera. 

MONTAGUE

And whosoe'er gainsays King Edward's right,By this I challenge him to single fight.

MONTAGUE

And whoever dares to to deny King Edward's right, I will challenge him to single combat. 

Throws down his gauntlet

ALL

Long live Edward the Fourth!

ALL

Long live Edward the Fourth! 

KING EDWARD IV

Thanks, brave Montgomery; and thanks unto you all: If fortune serve me, I'll requite this kindness. Now, for this night, let's harbour here in York; And when the morning sun shall raise his car Above the border of this horizon, We'll forward towards Warwick and his mates; For well I wot that Henry is no soldier. Ah, froward Clarence! How evil it beseems thee To flatter Henry and forsake thy brother! Yet, as we may, we'll meet both thee and Warwick. Come on, brave soldiers: doubt not of the day, And, that once gotten, doubt not of large pay.

KING EDWARD IV

Thanks, brave Montgomery, and thanks to all of you. If luck is on my side, I'll repay your kindness. Now, let's stay here in York for tonight. And when the morning sun rises, we'll go towards Warwick and his men, because I know well that Henry is not a soldier. Ah, unreasonable Clarence! How evil it seems for you to follow Henry and abandon your brother! Yes, we may meet both you and Warwick in battle. Come on, brave soldiers, do not doubt we'll have victory in battle. And, once we have it, don't doubt that you'll be paid well for it. 

Exeunt

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Nina romancikova
About the Translator: Nina Romancikova

Nina Romancikova is from Slovakia but her love of literature and theater has brought her to the UK and she has been living and studying there for the past six years. She graduated with a degree in English Literature and Language at University of Glasgow in 2016. Nina is now finishing her Masters in Shakespeare Studies at King's College London and is currently working as a Research Intern at Shakespeare's Globe.