Columbine

Columbine

by

Dave Cullen

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Dylan Klebold Character Analysis

The second of the Columbine killers, Dylan Klebold was a “born genius” who, despite a sensitive disposition, experienced explosions of rage (most often brought on by failure or humiliation,) suicidal tendencies, a disdain for the “zombie”-like human race, and a suggestibility upon which the psychopathic Eric Harris, between 1997-99, consistently preyed. Dylan did not share Eric’s desire for total annihilation, though he at times gleefully parroted back Eric’s dreams of laying waste to all of humanity. He was torn between love and suicide—he felt that girls, especially, rejected him at every turn, and he used alcohol to soothe the pain of his loneliness. After joining Eric on a series of “missions,” which began as petty, harmless pranks and eventually escalated to felony theft which forced both boys into a diversion program in order to avoid jail time, Eric and Dylan began acquiring ordnance—buying guns and building pipe bombs and other small explosives. Dylan and Eric planned a large-scale bombing of their high school, hoping to take out five hundred lives in seconds and top the record for deadliest terrorist attack in American history. Eric’s understanding of circuitry was shaky at best, though, and the bombing was a failure. With no Plan B in place—the boys had not even considered that they might fail—the two of them advanced on their school and began shooting at classmates and teachers and launching smaller explosive devices throughout the school. After a massacre which culminated in a shootout in the school’s library, the boys returned once more to the explosive devices they’d placed in the cafeteria, and attempted to detonate them. Unable to do so, they returned to the library and committed suicide side by side. Dylan’s weapons were fired far fewer times than Eric’s, and in general Cullen finds himself more able to empathize with the “lost” Dylan than the psychopathic Eric, but both boys were caught up in a “dyad”—a murderous pair which feeds off one another, and which, in the case of Eric and Dylan, led to “mutually assured destruction.”

Dylan Klebold Quotes in Columbine

The Columbine quotes below are all either spoken by Dylan Klebold or refer to Dylan Klebold. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Twelve edition of Columbine published in 2010.
Chapter 14 Quotes

The fundamental experience for most of America was almost witnessing mass murder. It was the panic and frustration of not knowing, the mounting terror of horror withheld, just out of view. We would learn the truth about Columbine, but we would not learn it today. The narrative unfolding on television looked nothing like the killers’ plan. It looked only moderately like what was actually occurring. It would take months for investigators to piece together what had gone on inside. Motive would take longer to unravel. It would be years before the detective team would explain why. The public couldn’t wait that long. The media was not about to. They speculated.

Related Characters: Dave Cullen (speaker), Eric Harris, Dylan Klebold
Page Number: 67
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 40 Quotes

Because dyads, murderous pairs who feed off each other, account for only a fraction of mass murderers, little research has been conducted on them. We know that the partnerships tend to be asymmetrical. An angry, erratic depressive and a sadistic psychopath make a combustible pair. The psychopath is in control, of course, but the hotheaded sidekick can sustain his excitement leading up to the big kill. “It takes heat and cold to make a tornado,” Dr. Fuselier is fond of saying. Eric craved heat, but he [easily grew bored and] couldn’t sustain it. Dylan was a volcano. You could never tell when he might erupt.

Related Characters: Dave Cullen (speaker), Dwayne Fuselier (speaker), Eric Harris, Dylan Klebold
Page Number: 244
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 48 Quotes

Now [Eric] had to concentrate on getting Dylan a second gun. And [he] had a whole lot of production work. If only he had a little more cash, he could move the experiments along. Oh well. You could fund only so many bombs at a pizza factory. And he needed his brakes checked, and he’d just had to buy winter wiper blades, and he had a whole bunch of new CDs to pick up.

Related Characters: Dave Cullen (speaker), Eric Harris, Dylan Klebold
Page Number: 306
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 49 Quotes

Oddballs are not the problem. They do not fit the profile. There is no profile. Attackers came from all ethnic, economic, and social classes. The bulk came from solid two-parent homes. Most had no criminal record or history of violence. The two biggest myths were that shooters were loners and that they “snapped.” A staggering 93 percent planned their attack in advance. “The path toward violence is an evolutionary one, with signposts along the way,” the FBI report said. Cultural influences appeared weak. Many perps shared a crucial experience: 98 percent had suffered a loss or failure they perceived as serious—anything from getting fired to blowing a test or getting dumped. Of course, everyone suffers loss and failure, but for these kids, the trauma seemed to set anger in motion. This was certainly true in Columbine; Dylan viewed his entire life as failure, and Eric’s arrest accelerated his anger.

Related Characters: Dave Cullen (speaker), Eric Harris, Dylan Klebold
Page Number: 322
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 50 Quotes

“More rage, more rage!” Eric demanded. He motioned with his arms. “Keep building it.”
Dylan hurled another Ericism: “It’s humans I hate.”
Eric raised Arlene, and aimed her at the camera. “You guys will all die, and it will be fucking soon,” he said. “You all need to die. We need to die, too.”
The boys made it clear, repeatedly, that they planned to die in battle. Their legacy would live. “We’re going to kick-start a revolution,” Eric said. “I declared war on the human race and war is what it is.”
He apologized to his mom. “I really am sorry about this, but war’s war.”

Related Characters: Eric Harris (speaker), Dylan Klebold (speaker)
Related Symbols: “Arlene”
Page Number: 327
Explanation and Analysis:
Epilogue Quotes

There’s another pernicious myth: that Eric and Dylan succeeded. Measured by [the shooters’] own standards, Columbine was a colossal failure so unrecognizable as terrorism that we ranked them first among the school shooters they ridiculed. Killers keep trying to relive the glory and elation at Columbine. There was none.

Related Characters: Dave Cullen (speaker), Eric Harris, Dylan Klebold
Page Number: 386
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Columbine LitChart as a printable PDF.
Columbine PDF

Dylan Klebold Character Timeline in Columbine

The timeline below shows where the character Dylan Klebold appears in Columbine. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 2: “Rebels” 
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...to charm and coolness. He works at a local pizza chain, Blackjack, with his friend Dylan. He is “striking,” with an “all-American” look and a “flirtatious” smile. (full context)
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Eric is, at the moment, jealous of his close friend, Dylan Klebold, who has a date for prom despite being “meek, self-conscious, and shy.” Cullen notes... (full context)
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Dylan’s prom date is “a sweet, brainy Christian girl” who has “helped to acquire three of... (full context)
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Eric and Dylan are active members of their school community. They attend spirit events, school plays, and football... (full context)
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Eric “fancie[s] himself a nonconformist,” but “crave[s]” approval and fume[s] over the slightest disrespect.” Dylan’s nickname is VoDKa—he is a heavy drinker. “To adult eyes,” Cullen says, Eric is the... (full context)
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...wild side” is Robert Kirgis, the owner of the Blackjack Pizza franchise where Eric and Dylan work. The three of them sometimes used to go up to the roof after closing... (full context)
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...authority,” noting that Eric was “unflappable” and “calmly calculating,” and often kept both himself and Dylan from getting in too much trouble—on the occasions that they were caught, Dylan, caught up... (full context)
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Eric and Dylan are “technology hounds,” and have an active life on the internet—they create websites, direct short... (full context)
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Dylan and Eric’s friends have noticed that the two of them are cutting class and falling... (full context)
Chapter 4: Rock ’n’ Bowl
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...16th, Eric Harris has two goals: acquire ammo and a prom date. Though he and Dylan both plan to be dead within a few days, for now they have a shift... (full context)
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Eric and Dylan’s friends Chris Morris, Nate Dykeman, and Zack Heckler have all worked at Blackjack before—it pays... (full context)
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...alley] with ‘Sieg Heil’ or ‘Heil Hitler.’” Cullen notes that “reports conflict [as to] whether Dylan followed [Eric’s] lead” when it came to the Nazi obsession. (full context)
Chapter 6: His Future
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Dylan enjoys his night out at prom—his date is beautiful, his friend group takes a stretch... (full context)
Chapter 8: Maximum Human Density
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Cullen believes it is a “safe bet” that Eric and Dylan viewed coverage of the Waco and Oklahoma City incidents on television—Timothy McVeigh, the perpetrator of... (full context)
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Eric and Dylan refer to their plot as “Judgment Day”—Eric has designed seven large bombs after finding recipes... (full context)
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...off anyone who survives the bombing with their firearms—a semiautomatic handgun and a shotgun for Dylan, and a carbine rifle and second shotgun for Eric. The two also plan to load... (full context)
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Eric and Dylan have been planning their attack for months, and considering it for well over a year.... (full context)
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...drug dealer who also runs guns and ammo, and the man from whom Eric purchased Dylan’s semiautomatic. Monday evening, after an uneventful day for both Eric and Dylan, Manes acquires ammo... (full context)
Chapter 10: Judgment
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On the morning of the massacre—Tuesday morning—Dylan Klebold leaves the house at 5:30. His parents, still in bed, hear him call out... (full context)
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Dylan and Eric head for school—they are already running behind schedule. Dylan wears cargo pants, a... (full context)
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...few miles from Columbine, the boys drive to school. They are on a tight schedule. Dylan parks in his regular spot in the senior lot, while Eric parks in the adjacent... (full context)
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Eric and Dylan drop off the duffel bags containing the propane and gasoline bombs in the commons, then... (full context)
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Eric and Dylan presume that their decoy bomb has done the job of distracting authorities, unaware that Jeffco... (full context)
Chapter 11: Female Down
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...planning the attack. Eric, Cullen says, “left no indication that he planned for contingencies, [while] Dylan left no indication that he planned much of anything.” (full context)
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...There, they ready their weapons and began firing. Eric “sho[ots] at anyone he [can] see. Dylan cheer[s] him on [but] rarely fire[s].” They begin tossing pipe bombs down the stairs and... (full context)
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...and pull him to safety. A janitor advises Sean to play dead, and he does.  Dylan steps over Sean’s body and enters the cafeteria, where a “stampede [is] under way.” Coach... (full context)
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Dylan enters the cafeteria just as it empties out. He “watche[s] students [flee] up the stairs,”... (full context)
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...of sight, then abandons her. She narrowly misses being caught by a nearby pipe bomb. Dylan rejoins Eric on the stairs, and the two of them realize that they no longer... (full context)
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Outside, Eric fires at Deputy Gardner—the first officer on the scene. Dylan flees inside. Gardner fires back, and believes he makes a hit—but Eric reloads his gun... (full context)
Chapter 12: The Perimeter
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...them have actually seen anything, and those who have are deeply confused. Because Eric and Dylan each removed their trench coats at different points in the attack, students report seeing many... (full context)
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...campus, sees the mayhem, and begins to put the pieces of the puzzle together—Eric and Dylan missed class that morning, and have recently been bragging about gathering ordnance--building pipe bombs and... (full context)
Chapter 13: “1 Bleeding to Death”
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...Cullen says that it will take the teams another three hours to find Eric and Dylan—and by the time they do, the shooters will have killed themselves.  (full context)
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A “terrified” Nate Dykeman breaks down and calls the Klebold residence. Dylan’s father Tom picks up, and assures Nate that Dylan is in school. Nate tells Tom... (full context)
Chapter 15: First Assumption
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...the lead investigator, and, from student reports, has identified the shooters as Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold and begun compiling information about both of the boys. She sends detectives to each... (full context)
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...too big to just have been orchestrated by the two gunmen. One of Eric and Dylan’s friends, Chris Morris, was home playing video games at the time of the attack. He... (full context)
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...be two very different motives at work in the attack—one for Eric, and one for Dylan. As reports of the shooters as loners and outcasts continue to emerge, witnesses from the... (full context)
Chapter 16:  The Boy in the Window
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...the killers enter through the building’s west doors. Mr. D runs “straight into [Eric and Dylan’s] gunfire,” shepherding the girls into a storage closet within the school’s gym. He tells the... (full context)
Chapter 17: The Sheriff
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Though it was treated as one, Columbine was “never” a hostage standoff. Dylan and Eric had no demands. As SWAT teams search the building and evacuate terrified students,... (full context)
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...are under tables, hidden, but two bodies are not—they match the descriptions of Eric and Dylan, and the SWAT team realizes that the ordeal is over. They discover Patti Nielson and... (full context)
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...does not want “another situation like O.J. Simpson [or] JonBenet Ramsey.” When Battan’s team runs Dylan and Eric’s names through the Jeffco system, they find that the boys had been arrested... (full context)
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...and dreams of setting pipe bombs off at school. Detectives believe that if Eric and Dylan leaked information to Chris, they must have leaked it to more of their friends—leaking is... (full context)
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...[their] child,” the Klebolds leave. When they speak to their lawyer, he warns that because Dylan is no longer around “for people to hate, people are going to hate [Tom and... (full context)
Chapter 20: Vacant
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...as “the presumption of guilt land[s] on their shoulders.” In the public opinion, Eric and Dylan are seen as “just kids,” not contributors to the tragedy, though violent movies and video... (full context)
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...and the library is a site of “unspeakable” carnage. Meanwhile, detectives clear out Eric and Dylan’s homes, and discover a “mother lode” of evidence and documentation at Eric’s house—“he wanted [the... (full context)
Chapter 22: Rush to Closure
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Reverend Don Marxhausen disagrees with the Evangelicals—he recognizes that Eric and Dylan are the symptom of a larger societal ill. Marxhausen and other non-Evangelical members of the... (full context)
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...for even more incriminating information. She insists that she had no idea that Eric and Dylan were planning an attack, and that they even “assured her they would never hurt anyone.”... (full context)
Chapter 23: Gifted Boy
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Dylan Klebold, Dave Cullen writes, was “born brilliant.” Named for the poet Dylan Thomas, he was... (full context)
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...the Klebolds, escaping the Denver sprawl “encroaching into Jeffco,” moved further back into the foothills. Dylan identified as a “part-time country boy.” Then in middle school, Dylan was “repuls[e]d” by “suburbanite... (full context)
Chapter 24: Hour of Need
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...his parish rolls that evening, Marxhausen realizes that Tom and Sue Klebold and their children, Dylan and Byron, had been members of the church five years ago. Though they didn’t stay... (full context)
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...was not my son.” Those attending the funeral “pour out their hearts” with anecdotes about Dylan, unable to understand where the violence and anti-Semitism come from—Sue herself is Jewish. (full context)
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The Klebolds are aware that if they bury Dylan, his grave will be defaced, so they elect to have him cremated. Marxhausen asks the... (full context)
Chapter 25: Threesome
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Eric and Dylan presumably met in middle school, though they did not really connect there. Brooks Brown, Dylan’s... (full context)
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Zack Heckler and Dylan shared one class their freshman year, but became fast friends. Zack, Dylan, and Eric all... (full context)
Chapter 27: Black
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...“cute,” though he “hated” his appearance. Cullen writes that though classmates described both Eric and Dylan as “want[ing] to be outcasts,” the word “outcast” only meant that the boys rejected a... (full context)
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...student referred to their clique as “the Trench Coat Mafia,” the term stuck. Eric and Dylan were not among the students who made up the TCM, though their friend Chris Morris... (full context)
Chapter 28: Media Crime
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...[Columbine] athletes.” Though the details are accurate—there were indeed tensions between these two groups—Eric and Dylan were a part of neither, and the media’s “conclusions [were] wrong.” (full context)
Chapter 29: The Missions
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...life [and] extinction fantasies” begin to translate to action. Starting in January of 1997, he, Dylan, and Zack begin to make “mischief,” embarking on a series of late-night “escapades” focused on... (full context)
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The “missions” continue. Eric loves them, and Dylan enjoys the camaraderie—but the missions are not enough to make the “miserable” Dylan feel any... (full context)
Chapter 30: Telling Us Why
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Long before the Columbine shooting, Jeffco police had files on both Eric and Dylan. They were in possession of at least twelve pages of “hate[ful], threatening” rants from Eric’s... (full context)
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...Chris obtains an admission from Duran that he had “been out shooting with Eric and Dylan [at a] place called Rampart Range.” Officials question Duran a few days later. Duran confesses... (full context)
Chapter 31: The Seeker 
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At the end of March of 1997, Dylan began keeping a journal. He was in pain, and nobody understood him. He was “consumed”... (full context)
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Dylan was lonelier than lonely—he felt “cut off” from humanity, and believed most people to be... (full context)
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Dylan’s journal began a year earlier than Eric’s, and was nearly five times as long. Eric,... (full context)
Chapter 33: Good-Bye
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Dylan believed that God had blessed him with some good things, but had also condemned him... (full context)
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...and experimenting with theft and setting off explosives. By the summer of 1997, Eric and Dylan had finished building their first pipe bomb—it was Eric’s “baby.” That summer, Eric—who had not... (full context)
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Eric, Zack, and Dylan got jobs at Blackjack. Zack met a girl, and drifted from their close-knit threesome. Dylan... (full context)
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Fuselier, reading Dylan’s journals in 1999, believes Dylan to be a “classic depressive.” He sees no evidence of... (full context)
Chapter 35: Arrest
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...at the end of summer 1997, Eric becomes more and more obsessed with death. With Dylan, he hacks into the school’s computer system in October of 1997 to steal locker combinations,... (full context)
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Dylan, in his journal, continues to fixate on Harriet, the girl he loves from afar. He... (full context)
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While Dylan is still grounded for the computer hack, his older brother Byron is kicked out of... (full context)
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Eric and Dylan continue to steal, taking equipment from the computer lab. Eric, at this point, may or... (full context)
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...and driving around aimlessly, steal a large amount of electronic equipment from a parked van. Dylan does the “dirty work,” wearing ski gloves to mask his fingerprints, while Eric stands guard.... (full context)
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The boys’ parents are at the police station when Eric and Dylan arrive. In their statements, Eric blames Dylan for masterminding the theft. Dylan alleges that the... (full context)
Chapter 36: Conspiracy
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...participation in the planning of the attack, and guilty knowledge of the attack. All of Dylan and Eric’s friends who’ve been interviewed have copped to knowing small details, but were “clueless”... (full context)
Chapter 37: Betrayed
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...has “anger issues” and thoughts of suicide, and is placed on an antidepressant. Eric and Dylan are forbidden from contacting one another. Eric’s computer access is revoked, and he continues to... (full context)
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Eric and Dylan do not tell their friends about their arrest or their punishments. Eventually, though, word gets... (full context)
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Dylan, alarmed by Eric’s rants, gives Brooks Brown Eric’s web address and tells him to look... (full context)
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Both Tom and Sue Klebold attend Dylan’s diversion program intake meeting. Dylan and his parents independently fill out an intake form, and... (full context)
Chapter 38: Martyr
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...remained conscious—she began to pray to God for her life. The killers overheard her, and Dylan asked her whether or not she believed in God—she answered yes, and Dylan began to... (full context)
Chapter 39: The Book of God
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...title his journal “The Book of God.” He refers to humans as mindless automatons, echoing Dylan’s earlier writings which described humans as “zombies.” Eric wants to impose a kind of natural... (full context)
Chapter 40: Psychopath
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...These partnerships—think Bonnie and Clyde—tend to be “asymmetrical,” and the dyad of Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold certainly was. Eric was the ringleader and sadistic psychopath, and Dylan was an angry,... (full context)
Chapter 42: Diversion
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After beginning their diversion program, Eric and Dylan receive their yearbooks, and write notes to each other referencing their anger over their January... (full context)
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While Dylan focuses only on describing their planned attack, Eric’s visions of murders are much more grandiose.... (full context)
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...begin their diversion program. Eric leans into attempting to charm and impress Andrea Sanchez, while Dylan consistently misses appointments, falls behind on his assigned community service, and starts failing two classes.... (full context)
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...buy a new computer—when in reality, he is planning on building an arsenal of ordnance. Dylan quits his job at Blackjack and does not find a replacement job over the summer—he... (full context)
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Though Dylan excitedly discusses NBK with Eric, he is “privately juggling suicide or true love.” He writes... (full context)
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As senior year starts, Eric continues to guide Dylan toward the realization of NBK. The two boys are in a video production class together,... (full context)
Chapter 43: Who Owns the Tragedy
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...in the water, but he knows he cannot. He breaks down—not angry at Eric or Dylan, but just angry. (full context)
Chapter 44: Bombs Are Hard
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...His grades are up, and his teachers leave “glowing” comments on his end-of-term report cards. Dylan, meanwhile, continues to “tank.” Dylan’s diversion officer warns him that if he does not improve,... (full context)
Chapter 45: Aftershocks
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...As injured students continue to “fight their way” toward recovery, a friend of Eric and Dylan’s is arrested on October 19th after starting a rumor that he planned to “finish the... (full context)
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With the threat of Eric and Dylan’s friend, the total number of expulsion proceedings in Jeffco since April has reached eight—there is... (full context)
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...Sheriff Stone publicly denounces the Klebolds’ claim, calling it “outrageous,” and blaming “their parenting” for Dylan’s role in Columbine. (full context)
Chapter 46: Guns
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...purchase the gun for them—she was eighteen years old, old enough to buy one—Eric and Dylan travel with Robyn to a local gun show and acquire two shotguns. Eric refers to... (full context)
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Eric loses interest in his journal after the acquisition of the guns. Dylan has not written in his journal for five months either, but takes to it again... (full context)
Chapter 48: An Emotion of God  
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...and incredibly time-consuming. Eric takes full charge of building the arsenal of ordnance for the attack—Dylan, Cullen writes, “seemed to be no help with any of it.” Eric, showing the textbook... (full context)
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The boys finish their diversion program. Dylan received a report describing his potential despite his struggles, while Eric’s report is “glowing.” (full context)
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...while Eric’s turning point toward murder was the arrest for theft in January of 1998, Dylan’s came later, in February of 1999. Dylan, who had been conflicted about taking part in... (full context)
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Eric and Dylan hike to Rampart Range for “target practice,” and bring Mark Manes, Phil Duran, and Mark’s... (full context)
Chapter 49: Ready To Be Done
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...killers, but school shooting deaths drop 25% in the next three years. However, Eric and Dylan do inspire several attacks which feature “terrorist tactics for personal aggrandizement.” Several Columbine-esque plots are... (full context)
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...attacks in advance, and 98% had “suffered a loss or failure they perceived as serious.” Dylan, Cullen writes, viewed his entire life as a failure, while Eric was driven to murder... (full context)
Chapter 50: The Basement Tapes
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...decides to begin recording videos laying out his plans. On March 15th, 1999, he and Dylan begin to make the Basement Tapes, using a camcorder borrowed from the Columbine video lab.... (full context)
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...behind Blackjack, but Chris is “unenthusiastic.” Chris begins to grow worried—he knows that Eric and Dylan have made a ton of bombs, and has heard that they have guns, too. Chris... (full context)
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...to recruit Chris several more times, joking about killing jocks and blowing up the school. Dylan, too, is “leaking indiscriminately,” displaying the pipe bombs in public. Eric tells Zack Heckler he’s... (full context)
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...over the weekend of the Prom, and Eric stashes the propane bombs he’s made at Dylan’s house. They show off for the camera the outfits they plan to wear during the... (full context)
Chapter 51: Two Hurdles
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...they are not qualified to “sort out” their son’s motive, but assure the public that Dylan took part in the shooting “in contradiction to the way he was raised.” They do... (full context)
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...America. Various aspects of the killings resemble Columbine closely, and shooters even cite Eric and Dylan’s “legacy” as inspiration. Cullen writes that over eighty school shootings took place in America in... (full context)
Chapter 52: Quiet
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...seem odd, Cullen writes, it is “normal” for psychopaths, who tire of their exploits easily. Dylan, Cullen surmises, was simply “indifferent [and] ready to die, fused with Eric and following his... (full context)
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...a day.” They sit down together. Eric puts his shotgun barrel in his mouth, and Dylan points his semiautomatic at his left temple. The boys commit suicide together. The police find... (full context)
Chapter 53: At the Broken Places
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...teach hostage negotiators around the world, and still hopes to one day interview Eric and Dylan’s parents. Brad and Misty Bernall moved out of Colorado. She Said Yes has sold over... (full context)
Afterword: Forgiveness
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...particularly angry at the “Evangelical[s] who cast Columbine as religious warfare” and at Eric and Dylan’s parents. Eventually, her husband Tom met with Sue Klebold, and then, together, Linda and Tom... (full context)
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Val Schnurr, a survivor of the library massacre, is “deliriously” happy. Dylan hit her with a blast from his shotgun, and the pain, physical therapy, surgery, and... (full context)
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Val is relieved that it was Dylan and not Eric who shot her—she knew Eric personally, but was not even aware of... (full context)
Epilogue: Apocalyptic Dreams
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...Eric Harris was like “examining a disease under a microscope,” getting inside the psyche of Dylan Klebold affected Cullen deeply. He feels a great sadness for Dylan, whom he calls a... (full context)
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...myth” about Columbine is that it was a success. The attack was, by Eric and Dylan’s “own standards, a colossal failure, [initially] unrecognizable as terrorism.” The killers, Cullen says, who to... (full context)
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...guns and mental health are unfairly conflated, and also notes that killers like Eric and Dylan don’t “snap; they smolder.” Cullen argues for screening to identify teen depression, which is valuable... (full context)