Columbine

Columbine

by

Dave Cullen

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Eric Harris Character Analysis

Eric Harris, the psychopathic ringleader of the Columbine shooting, kept meticulous journals for a year and a half prior to Columbine, planning the attack and describing his motive for carrying it out: his burning, undying hatred of the human race and his desire for its total annihilation. An overachiever in school and a “charming” young man with an active social life, Eric was not the bullied outcast the media attempted to cast both him and Dylan Klebold as. Rather, Eric—according to Dave Cullen and to Columbine investigator and FBI psychology expert Dwayne Fuselier—was a “full-blown psychopath,” a charming but cunning and manipulative individual incapable of experiencing empathy for another human being. As Eric’s high school career progressed, he experienced several failures, the most notable being first the falling out of his friendship with Brooks Brown, which threw him into a tailspin of spewing hatred on his own personal blog and repeated threats and attacks against Brown and his family; and second, Eric and Dylan were arrested for felony theft and forced to enter a diversion program in order to avoid being sentenced to prison. These indignations sent Eric Harris into a frenzy, and he began planning a day of judgment, which he referred to as NBK (after the film Natural Born Killers,) and which he hoped would bring him the satisfaction and glory of wiping out as many as two thousand people—the entire student population of Columbine—in one afternoon. A lifelong lover of explosives, Eric began building pipe bombs and smaller “cricket” bombs made from fireworks, as well as recruiting his friend Dylan’s prom date, Robyn Anderson, to help the boys acquire guns. Eric steadily convinced Dylan to take part in the killings, though Dylan privately showed a great deal of resistance. As the date of the attack grew closer, Eric developed a fascination with wearing all-black outfits, Nazi ideology and the life of Adolf Hitler, and obsessively recording—alone in journals and together with Dylan in a series of videotaped addresses to their “audience”—his hatred of humanity, desire for its destruction, and plans for the earth-shattering attack which he hoped would bring him glory, fame, and eternal recognition. Eric sadistically and indiscriminately murdered twelve classmates and one teacher before growing tired of the massacre. After failing twice to explode massive propane bombs he’d shoddily constructed in his parents’ home, Eric and Dylan both retreated to the school’s library and committed suicide together. Though Eric’s method of suicide—a gunshot through the mouth—left behind nothing to scan, experts believe that, had a brain scan been performed, Eric’s would have shown levels of activity barely recognizable as human—the most conclusive sign of psychopathy.

Eric Harris Quotes in Columbine

The Columbine quotes below are all either spoken by Eric Harris or refer to Eric Harris. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Twelve edition of Columbine published in 2010.
Chapter 14 Quotes

The fundamental experience for most of America was almost witnessing mass murder. It was the panic and frustration of not knowing, the mounting terror of horror withheld, just out of view. We would learn the truth about Columbine, but we would not learn it today. The narrative unfolding on television looked nothing like the killers’ plan. It looked only moderately like what was actually occurring. It would take months for investigators to piece together what had gone on inside. Motive would take longer to unravel. It would be years before the detective team would explain why. The public couldn’t wait that long. The media was not about to. They speculated.

Related Characters: Dave Cullen (speaker), Eric Harris, Dylan Klebold
Page Number: 67
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 40 Quotes

Because dyads, murderous pairs who feed off each other, account for only a fraction of mass murderers, little research has been conducted on them. We know that the partnerships tend to be asymmetrical. An angry, erratic depressive and a sadistic psychopath make a combustible pair. The psychopath is in control, of course, but the hotheaded sidekick can sustain his excitement leading up to the big kill. “It takes heat and cold to make a tornado,” Dr. Fuselier is fond of saying. Eric craved heat, but he [easily grew bored and] couldn’t sustain it. Dylan was a volcano. You could never tell when he might erupt.

Related Characters: Dave Cullen (speaker), Dwayne Fuselier (speaker), Eric Harris, Dylan Klebold
Page Number: 244
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 44 Quotes

Eric didn’t have the political agenda of a terrorist, but he had adopted terrorist tactics. Sociology professor Mark Juergensmeyer identified the central characteristic of terrorism as “performance violence.” Terrorists design events “to be spectacular in their viciousness and awesome in their destructive power. Such instances of exaggerated violence are constructed events: they are mind-numbing, mesmerizing theater.”

Related Characters: Dave Cullen (speaker), Eric Harris
Page Number: 277
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 48 Quotes

Now [Eric] had to concentrate on getting Dylan a second gun. And [he] had a whole lot of production work. If only he had a little more cash, he could move the experiments along. Oh well. You could fund only so many bombs at a pizza factory. And he needed his brakes checked, and he’d just had to buy winter wiper blades, and he had a whole bunch of new CDs to pick up.

Related Characters: Dave Cullen (speaker), Eric Harris, Dylan Klebold
Page Number: 306
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 49 Quotes

Oddballs are not the problem. They do not fit the profile. There is no profile. Attackers came from all ethnic, economic, and social classes. The bulk came from solid two-parent homes. Most had no criminal record or history of violence. The two biggest myths were that shooters were loners and that they “snapped.” A staggering 93 percent planned their attack in advance. “The path toward violence is an evolutionary one, with signposts along the way,” the FBI report said. Cultural influences appeared weak. Many perps shared a crucial experience: 98 percent had suffered a loss or failure they perceived as serious—anything from getting fired to blowing a test or getting dumped. Of course, everyone suffers loss and failure, but for these kids, the trauma seemed to set anger in motion. This was certainly true in Columbine; Dylan viewed his entire life as failure, and Eric’s arrest accelerated his anger.

Related Characters: Dave Cullen (speaker), Eric Harris, Dylan Klebold
Page Number: 322
Explanation and Analysis:
Chapter 50 Quotes

“More rage, more rage!” Eric demanded. He motioned with his arms. “Keep building it.”
Dylan hurled another Ericism: “It’s humans I hate.”
Eric raised Arlene, and aimed her at the camera. “You guys will all die, and it will be fucking soon,” he said. “You all need to die. We need to die, too.”
The boys made it clear, repeatedly, that they planned to die in battle. Their legacy would live. “We’re going to kick-start a revolution,” Eric said. “I declared war on the human race and war is what it is.”
He apologized to his mom. “I really am sorry about this, but war’s war.”

Related Characters: Eric Harris (speaker), Dylan Klebold (speaker)
Related Symbols: “Arlene”
Page Number: 327
Explanation and Analysis:
Epilogue Quotes

There’s another pernicious myth: that Eric and Dylan succeeded. Measured by [the shooters’] own standards, Columbine was a colossal failure so unrecognizable as terrorism that we ranked them first among the school shooters they ridiculed. Killers keep trying to relive the glory and elation at Columbine. There was none.

Related Characters: Dave Cullen (speaker), Eric Harris, Dylan Klebold
Page Number: 386
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire Columbine LitChart as a printable PDF.
Columbine PDF

Eric Harris Character Timeline in Columbine

The timeline below shows where the character Eric Harris appears in Columbine. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 2: “Rebels” 
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Eric Harris, a senior boy, is desperate for a date to prom. Though dates are not... (full context)
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Eric is, at the moment, jealous of his close friend, Dylan Klebold, who has a date... (full context)
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Eric and Dylan are active members of their school community. They attend spirit events, school plays,... (full context)
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Eric “fancie[s] himself a nonconformist,” but “crave[s]” approval and fume[s] over the slightest disrespect.” Dylan’s nickname... (full context)
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One adult who is “acquainted with Eric’s wild side” is Robert Kirgis, the owner of the Blackjack Pizza franchise where Eric and... (full context)
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Cullen writes that “nothing separated the boys’ personalities like a run-in with authority,” noting that Eric was “unflappable” and “calmly calculating,” and often kept both himself and Dylan from getting in... (full context)
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Eric and Dylan are “technology hounds,” and have an active life on the internet—they create websites,... (full context)
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Dylan and Eric’s friends have noticed that the two of them are cutting class and falling down on... (full context)
Chapter 4: Rock ’n’ Bowl
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On Friday, April 16th, Eric Harris has two goals: acquire ammo and a prom date. Though he and Dylan both... (full context)
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Eric and Dylan’s friends Chris Morris, Nate Dykeman, and Zack Heckler have all worked at Blackjack... (full context)
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...Friday night activity. Both boys take early-morning bowling classes three days a week, too. Lately, Eric has been getting into “German shit,” quoting Nietzsche and Freud as often as he quotes... (full context)
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The boys head home early. Eric calls Susan, but her mother answers. When she tells Eric that Susan is sleeping at... (full context)
Chapter 6: His Future
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...in touch” once they scatter for college in the fall. While Dylan is at prom, Eric has Susan over to watch a cheesy movie. The two have a quiet night in,... (full context)
Chapter 8: Maximum Human Density
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Cullen believes it is a “safe bet” that Eric and Dylan viewed coverage of the Waco and Oklahoma City incidents on television—Timothy McVeigh, the... (full context)
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Eric and Dylan refer to their plot as “Judgment Day”—Eric has designed seven large bombs after... (full context)
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...semiautomatic handgun and a shotgun for Dylan, and a carbine rifle and second shotgun for Eric. The two also plan to load up on smaller pipe bombs, Molotov cocktails, knives, and... (full context)
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Eric and Dylan have been planning their attack for months, and considering it for well over... (full context)
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Eric planned the massacre for the Monday after prom, but failed to acquire enough ammo over... (full context)
Chapter 10: Judgment
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...store to purchase additional propane tanks. By seven in the morning, the boys return to Eric’s house, where they split up to continue assembling supplies. They rendezvous once more to practice,... (full context)
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Dylan and Eric head for school—they are already running behind schedule. Dylan wears cargo pants, a black t-shirt... (full context)
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...on a tight schedule. Dylan parks in his regular spot in the senior lot, while Eric parks in the adjacent junior lot. Brooks Brown, on his way out to lunch, spots... (full context)
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Eric and Dylan drop off the duffel bags containing the propane and gasoline bombs in the... (full context)
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Eric and Dylan presume that their decoy bomb has done the job of distracting authorities, unaware... (full context)
Chapter 11: Female Down
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...boys decide to go to Plan B—though “there [is] no Plan B,” so “staggering” was Eric’s self-assuredness while planning the attack. Eric, Cullen says, “left no indication that he planned for... (full context)
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...outside stairs toward the building’s west exit. There, they ready their weapons and began firing. Eric “sho[ots] at anyone he [can] see. Dylan cheer[s] him on [but] rarely fire[s].” They begin... (full context)
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Eric, still outside at the top of the stairs, shoots at a student named Anne Marie... (full context)
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Outside, Eric fires at Deputy Gardner—the first officer on the scene. Dylan flees inside. Gardner fires back,... (full context)
Chapter 12: The Perimeter
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...all of them have actually seen anything, and those who have are deeply confused. Because Eric and Dylan each removed their trench coats at different points in the attack, students report... (full context)
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...returns to campus, sees the mayhem, and begins to put the pieces of the puzzle together—Eric and Dylan missed class that morning, and have recently been bragging about gathering ordnance--building pipe... (full context)
Chapter 13: “1 Bleeding to Death”
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...the moment, Cullen says that it will take the teams another three hours to find Eric and Dylan—and by the time they do, the shooters will have killed themselves.  (full context)
Chapter 15: First Assumption
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...Battan is named the lead investigator, and, from student reports, has identified the shooters as Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold and begun compiling information about both of the boys. She sends... (full context)
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...it is too big to just have been orchestrated by the two gunmen. One of Eric and Dylan’s friends, Chris Morris, was home playing video games at the time of the... (full context)
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...already that there may be two very different motives at work in the attack—one for Eric, and one for Dylan. As reports of the shooters as loners and outcasts continue to... (full context)
Chapter 16:  The Boy in the Window
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...play softball, the killers enter through the building’s west doors. Mr. D runs “straight into [Eric and Dylan’s] gunfire,” shepherding the girls into a storage closet within the school’s gym. He... (full context)
Chapter 17: The Sheriff
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Though it was treated as one, Columbine was “never” a hostage standoff. Dylan and Eric had no demands. As SWAT teams search the building and evacuate terrified students, they are... (full context)
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...the library are under tables, hidden, but two bodies are not—they match the descriptions of Eric and Dylan, and the SWAT team realizes that the ordeal is over. They discover Patti... (full context)
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...want “another situation like O.J. Simpson [or] JonBenet Ramsey.” When Battan’s team runs Dylan and Eric’s names through the Jeffco system, they find that the boys had been arrested the year... (full context)
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Meanwhile, Chris Morris confesses everything he knows to the police, describing Eric’s fascination with Nazis and dreams of setting pipe bombs off at school. Detectives believe that... (full context)
Chapter 20: Vacant
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...hire attorneys as “the presumption of guilt land[s] on their shoulders.” In the public opinion, Eric and Dylan are seen as “just kids,” not contributors to the tragedy, though violent movies... (full context)
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...completely flooded, and the library is a site of “unspeakable” carnage. Meanwhile, detectives clear out Eric and Dylan’s homes, and discover a “mother lode” of evidence and documentation at Eric’s house—“he... (full context)
Chapter 21: First Memories
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Eric exhibited “telltale signs of a particular breed of killer” even before adolescence, and as a... (full context)
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In the journals he left behind, Eric wrote “frequently and fondly” of his childhood. He especially loved fireworks and explosions, and shared... (full context)
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Eric was a military brat, and lived in five states over a period of fifteen years.... (full context)
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As an eleven-year-old, Eric discovered the video game Doom, and became obsessed. Behind the screen of a computer, “he... (full context)
Chapter 22: Rush to Closure
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Reverend Don Marxhausen disagrees with the Evangelicals—he recognizes that Eric and Dylan are the symptom of a larger societal ill. Marxhausen and other non-Evangelical members... (full context)
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...her heavily for even more incriminating information. She insists that she had no idea that Eric and Dylan were planning an attack, and that they even “assured her they would never... (full context)
Chapter 25: Threesome
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Eric and Dylan presumably met in middle school, though they did not really connect there. Brooks... (full context)
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In an “I Am” poem, a class assignment from his freshman year, Eric described “five times in eighteen lines how nice he was.” He described dreaming of himself... (full context)
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...and Dylan shared one class their freshman year, but became fast friends. Zack, Dylan, and Eric all became a group soon enough, and would play video games together. On his own,... (full context)
Chapter 27: Black
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By Eric Harris’s sophomore year, he was “evolving”—and the changes were beginning to show. He had striven... (full context)
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During Eric Harris’s sophomore year, Eric Dutro, another boy at Columbine, wanting to go as Dracula for... (full context)
Chapter 28: Media Crime
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...TCM and [Columbine] athletes.” Though the details are accurate—there were indeed tensions between these two groups—Eric and Dylan were a part of neither, and the media’s “conclusions [were] wrong.” (full context)
Chapter 29: The Missions
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Halfway through his sophomore year, Eric’s “active fantasy life [and] extinction fantasies” begin to translate to action. Starting in January of... (full context)
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The boys begin to get into other kids of trouble, too. Eric and Brooks Brown’s friendship falls apart—Eric, during a snowball fight, breaks the windshield of Brooks’... (full context)
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After Brooks’ mother becomes involved in the incident, Eric’s parents confront him, and he describes in his journal lying to them “like a fuckin... (full context)
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Eric posts Brooks’ name and phone number to his personal website, encouraging his readers to harass... (full context)
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The “missions” continue. Eric loves them, and Dylan enjoys the camaraderie—but the missions are not enough to make the... (full context)
Chapter 30: Telling Us Why
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Long before the Columbine shooting, Jeffco police had files on both Eric and Dylan. They were in possession of at least twelve pages of “hate[ful], threatening” rants... (full context)
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Judy and Randy Brown, Brooks’ parents, had sent the sheriff’s department the pages from Eric’s website, and had warned officials “repeatedly” about Eric for over a year. Even after the... (full context)
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...Browns insist to the press that they contacted the sheriff’s department fifteen times to discuss Eric. However, Jeffco officials insist that the Browns never met with an investigator, “despite holding a... (full context)
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...Hicks and Mike Guerra—investigated one of the Browns’ many complaints, and “discovered substantial evidence that Eric was building pipe bombs.” Guerra drafted a search warrant but “for some reason” it was... (full context)
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...officials hold a press conference in which they “boldly lie” about what they knew about Eric Harris’s “motive, means, and opportunity” well in advance of the shooting. Investigator Guerra’s file on... (full context)
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...listens in, Chris obtains an admission from Duran that he had “been out shooting with Eric and Dylan [at a] place called Rampart Range.” Officials question Duran a few days later.... (full context)
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...the “expert” on the boys among his peers and subordinates alike. When he comes across Eric’s journal, which opens with the line “I hate the fucking world,” Fuselier realizes he is... (full context)
Chapter 31: The Seeker 
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Dylan’s journal began a year earlier than Eric’s, and was nearly five times as long. Eric, however, began his journal “as a killer,”... (full context)
Chapter 33: Good-Bye
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Meanwhile, Eric was learning to “cover his tracks” when it came to his continuing missions, and experimenting... (full context)
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Eric’s loves and ideas all began to come together during this time. He “hated inferiors, loved... (full context)
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Eric, Zack, and Dylan got jobs at Blackjack. Zack met a girl, and drifted from their... (full context)
Chapter 35: Arrest
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After stealing a set of signs at the end of summer 1997, Eric becomes more and more obsessed with death. With Dylan, he hacks into the school’s computer... (full context)
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Fuselier wonders what Eric’s psychological state might have been at this point. Though his website is angry and surely... (full context)
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Eric’s father discovered one of his pipe bombs in the fall of 1997. Eric told his... (full context)
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Toward the end of 1997, Eric completes a school paper about school shootings. He writes that it is “just as easy... (full context)
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Eric and Dylan continue to steal, taking equipment from the computer lab. Eric, at this point,... (full context)
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...parked van. Dylan does the “dirty work,” wearing ski gloves to mask his fingerprints, while Eric stands guard. The boys drive away to play with their new toys, but once they... (full context)
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The boys’ parents are at the police station when Eric and Dylan arrive. In their statements, Eric blames Dylan for masterminding the theft. Dylan alleges... (full context)
Chapter 36: Conspiracy
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...the planning of the attack, and guilty knowledge of the attack. All of Dylan and Eric’s friends who’ve been interviewed have copped to knowing small details, but were “clueless” about the... (full context)
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...“whys,” the media locks onto a new angle of motive behind the attacks: the Marines. Eric had been talking to a Marine recruiter during the last few weeks before the attack.... (full context)
Chapter 37: Betrayed
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In the wake of Eric’s arrest for theft, his parents realize he needs professional help. Wayne Harris searches for a... (full context)
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Eric and Dylan do not tell their friends about their arrest or their punishments. Eventually, though,... (full context)
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Wayne Harris works diligently to get Eric into a diversion program. Meanwhile, Eric is detonating his first pipe bombs in his spare... (full context)
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Dylan, alarmed by Eric’s rants, gives Brooks Brown Eric’s web address and tells him to look at it, but... (full context)
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Wayne and Kathy attend Eric’s intake session, too, and are surprised that on a checklist of thirty “potential problem areas,”... (full context)
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...continue to hound the cops. Investigator Guerra drafts an affidavit for a search warrant of Eric’s house, and even mentions within it the pipe bomb recently discovered near Eric’s house. The... (full context)
Chapter 39: The Book of God
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As Eric prepares to begin the diversion program—and his senior year—he lashes out even more angrily in... (full context)
Chapter 40: Psychopath
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Insanity, Dr. Fuselier knows, is “marked by mental confusion.” Eric Harris’s journals reveal a cold but highly rational kind of calculation. Fuselier also notes that... (full context)
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...on one another. These partnerships—think Bonnie and Clyde—tend to be “asymmetrical,” and the dyad of Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold certainly was. Eric was the ringleader and sadistic psychopath, and Dylan... (full context)
Chapter 41: The Parents Group
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Though Fuselier is confident in his diagnosis of Eric as a psychopath, he knows there will controversy and “resistance” over diagnosing such a young... (full context)
Chapter 42: Diversion
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After beginning their diversion program, Eric and Dylan receive their yearbooks, and write notes to each other referencing their anger over... (full context)
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While Dylan focuses only on describing their planned attack, Eric’s visions of murders are much more grandiose. Cullen writes that “neither addressed the discrepancy” between... (full context)
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The boys’ behavior “shift[s] dramatically in reverse directions” once they begin their diversion program. Eric leans into attempting to charm and impress Andrea Sanchez, while Dylan consistently misses appointments, falls... (full context)
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Eric earns a raise and takes on a second job, telling friends and family that he... (full context)
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...the boys are required to write letters of apology to the owner of the van. Eric’s is deeply contrite and remorseful—“he knew exactly what empathy looked like.” In his journal, “at... (full context)
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It’s difficult for Eric to fool his father Wayne. Wayne’s last entry in his journal, in April—after the orientation... (full context)
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Though Dylan excitedly discusses NBK with Eric, he is “privately juggling suicide or true love.” He writes Harriet, the girl with whom... (full context)
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Eric writes threatening and anonymous emails to Brooks Brown, and his parents once again called the... (full context)
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As senior year starts, Eric continues to guide Dylan toward the realization of NBK. The two boys are in a... (full context)
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Eric writes an essay for school titled “Is Murder or Breaking the Law Ever Justified?” Cullen... (full context)
Chapter 43: Who Owns the Tragedy
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...get back in the water, but he knows he cannot. He breaks down—not angry at Eric or Dylan, but just angry. (full context)
Chapter 44: Bombs Are Hard
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Eric begins putting his arsenal together just before Halloween of 1998, building “cricket” bombs from fireworks... (full context)
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Eric continued to “script Columbine as a made-for-TV murder,” using fear and terror as his “ultimate”... (full context)
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Eric is caught with alcohol, and lies spectacularly to his father to get out of trouble.... (full context)
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Eric continues building pipe bombs and attempting to acquire guns. A recent bill passed by Congress,... (full context)
Chapter 45: Aftershocks
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...the media. As injured students continue to “fight their way” toward recovery, a friend of Eric and Dylan’s is arrested on October 19th after starting a rumor that he planned to... (full context)
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With the threat of Eric and Dylan’s friend, the total number of expulsion proceedings in Jeffco since April has reached... (full context)
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...Klebold, who charge the sheriff’s department for failing to alert them about its investigation of Eric’s troubling behavior. Sheriff Stone publicly denounces the Klebolds’ claim, calling it “outrageous,” and blaming “their... (full context)
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The Jeffco sheriff’s department refuses to release reports on Eric’s journal, though a passage of it leaks through Kate Battan. The victims’ families demand to... (full context)
Chapter 46: Guns
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Eric acquires his first shotgun on November 22nd, 1998. He names it “Arlene.” After recruiting their... (full context)
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Eric orders ammunition, and the gun shop calls his home phone when his order comes in.... (full context)
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Eric loses interest in his journal after the acquisition of the guns. Dylan has not written... (full context)
Chapter 47: Lawsuits
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...question of “why,” and covers up the botched investigation into the Brown family’s reports of Eric’s disturbing and violent behavior. The report is ridiculed. (full context)
Chapter 48: An Emotion of God  
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Eric Harris finds napalm hard to work with. He makes several bad batches, each of which... (full context)
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...finish their diversion program. Dylan received a report describing his potential despite his struggles, while Eric’s report is “glowing.” (full context)
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Cullen observes that while Eric’s turning point toward murder was the arrest for theft in January of 1998, Dylan’s came... (full context)
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Eric and Dylan hike to Rampart Range for “target practice,” and bring Mark Manes, Phil Duran,... (full context)
Chapter 49: Ready To Be Done
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...to the shooting, and information on their cover-up of the dropped ball on looking into Eric emerges. Anger and contempt grow, and a federal judge orders Jeffco to hand over key... (full context)
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...A series of defendants are added, including school officials, the manufacturers of Luvox (the antidepressant Eric had been taking at the time of the massacre,) and anyone at all who had... (full context)
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...for copycat killers, but school shooting deaths drop 25% in the next three years. However, Eric and Dylan do inspire several attacks which feature “terrorist tactics for personal aggrandizement.” Several Columbine-esque... (full context)
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...they perceived as serious.” Dylan, Cullen writes, viewed his entire life as a failure, while Eric was driven to murder by his indignation over his arrest. The FBI releases a list... (full context)
Chapter 50: The Basement Tapes
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Eric, wanting to be remembered, decides to begin recording videos laying out his plans. On March... (full context)
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Eric, struck with a new idea, attempt to recruit Chris Morris to expand the range of... (full context)
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Eric attempts to recruit Chris several more times, joking about killing jocks and blowing up the... (full context)
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The boys continue to make tapes over the weekend of the Prom, and Eric stashes the propane bombs he’s made at Dylan’s house. They show off for the camera... (full context)
Chapter 51: Two Hurdles
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In September 2003, the “last known layer of the cover-up” of the investigation into Eric comes out. The new sheriff of Jeffco, Ted Mink, orders the Colorado Attorney General to... (full context)
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...hold of America. Various aspects of the killings resemble Columbine closely, and shooters even cite Eric and Dylan’s “legacy” as inspiration. Cullen writes that over eighty school shootings took place in... (full context)
Chapter 52: Quiet
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...their exploits easily. Dylan, Cullen surmises, was simply “indifferent [and] ready to die, fused with Eric and following his lead.” (full context)
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...witnesses in the library would later describe—the boys slouch and droop, stripped of their bravado. Eric’s nose is broken. The boys continue to drift through the school surveying the “pathetic” damage.... (full context)
Chapter 53: At the Broken Places
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...continues to teach hostage negotiators around the world, and still hopes to one day interview Eric and Dylan’s parents. Brad and Misty Bernall moved out of Colorado. She Said Yes has... (full context)
Afterword: Forgiveness
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...She is particularly angry at the “Evangelical[s] who cast Columbine as religious warfare” and at Eric and Dylan’s parents. Eventually, her husband Tom met with Sue Klebold, and then, together, Linda... (full context)
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Val is relieved that it was Dylan and not Eric who shot her—she knew Eric personally, but was not even aware of Dylan’s existence. If... (full context)
Epilogue: Apocalyptic Dreams
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...erupt, and the “peculiar[ity]” of grief—he identifies his personal “poison” as “victim stories.” While studying Eric Harris was like “examining a disease under a microscope,” getting inside the psyche of Dylan... (full context)
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...most “pernicious myth” about Columbine is that it was a success. The attack was, by Eric and Dylan’s “own standards, a colossal failure, [initially] unrecognizable as terrorism.” The killers, Cullen says,... (full context)
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...He believes guns and mental health are unfairly conflated, and also notes that killers like Eric and Dylan don’t “snap; they smolder.” Cullen argues for screening to identify teen depression, which... (full context)