Don Quixote

Don Quixote

Sancho is a peasant who lives in Quixote’s village, and he is Quixote’s faithful squire. Sancho’s transformation over the course of the two parts of the history is an astonishing one. In the beginning, he is a coarse, greedy, gluttonous, big-bellied peasant – or, at least, that is his part to play. He is illiterate and ignorant, and he finds Quixote’s ideas mystifying and irrelevant. But as he observes Quixote’s marvelous, hopeless, inexplicable courage, his distrust turns to affection and admiration. He begins to listen closely to Quixote’s wild-eyed speeches, and he finds them to be beautiful and true. He admires Quixote’s intelligence and kind spirit. By the beginning of the second part, he has begun to take Quixote’s ideas about self-making to heart; he, too, can be intelligent, big-hearted, and idealistic, if he chooses. Slowly, blunderingly, he does become intelligent and big-hearted. By the end of the novel, he has turned into a wise arbiter, a fine judge of human nature.

Sancho Panza Quotes in Don Quixote

The Don Quixote quotes below are all either spoken by Sancho Panza or refer to Sancho Panza. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
).
Part 1, Chapter 8 Quotes

But Don Quixote was so convinced that they were giants that he neither heard his squire Sancho’s shouts nor saw what stood in front of him.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha, Sancho Panza
Part 1, Chapter 15 Quotes

…wondering whether the beating was dishonorable or not doesn’t bother me in the slightest – all that does bother me is the pain of those staff-blows.

Related Characters: Sancho Panza (speaker)
Part 1, Chapter 16 Quotes

… a knight adventurer, to cut a long story short, is someone who’s being beaten up one moment and being crowned emperor the next.

Related Characters: Sancho Panza (speaker), Don Quixote de la Mancha
Part 1, Chapter 20 Quotes

You can sleep, you were born to sleep – indeed you can do as you wish – but I shall behave as I consider befits my aspirations.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker), Sancho Panza
Part 1, Chapter 25 Quotes

What a string of absurdities you have come out with now, Sancho! What connection is there between what we are discussing and all those proverbs you have just threaded together?

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker), Sancho Panza

Is it possible that in all the time you have been with me you have failed to realize that all things appertaining to us knights errant seem like chimeras, follies, and nonsenses, because they have all been turned on their head? Not because that is their real state, but because we are always attended by a crew of enchanters.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker), Sancho Panza
Part 1, Chapter 31 Quotes

That’s the kind of love… that I’ve heard in sermons we’re supposed to feel for our Lord – for his own sake, without being moved by hopes of glory or fears of punishment. Though I must say I’d prefer to love him for what he can do for me.

Related Characters: Sancho Panza (speaker)
Part 1, Chapter 42 Quotes

I might be poor but I’m of old Christian stock, and I don’t owe anybody anything, and if I’m set on islands others are set on worse, and deeds make the man, and being as I am a man I can get to be pope let alone governor of an island. … You be careful what you say, mister barber, there are other things in life than shaving beards, and each man’s a little bit different from the next.

Related Characters: Sancho Panza (speaker)
Part 1, Chapter 50 Quotes

You go wherever you like, and eat as much as you can; I am fully satisfied already, and only need refection for my spirit, which I shall obtain by listening to this good fellow’s story.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker), Sancho Panza, The canon
Part 1, Chapter 52 Quotes

O pride of your family, honour and glory of all La Mancha and all the world – now that you’ve gone from it, it’ll fill up with evil-doers who won’t be frightened of being punished for their wicked ways! ... O you who were humble to the haughty and haughty to the humble, tackler of dangers, taker of insults, in love without a cause, imitator of the good, scourge of the wicked, enemy of villains – in a word, knight errant, and that says it all!

Related Characters: Sancho Panza (speaker), Don Quixote de la Mancha
Part 2, Chapter 2 Quotes

We shall soon see where this great fabric of absurdities leaves this knight and this squire – anyone would think they’d been made in the same mold, and that the madness of the master wouldn’t be worth a farthing without the foolishness of the man.

Related Characters: The priest (speaker), Don Quixote de la Mancha, Sancho Panza
Part 2, Chapter 8 Quotes

And so, O Sancho, our works must not stray beyond the limits imposed by the Christian religion that we profess. In slaying giants, we must slay pride; in our generosity and magnanimity, we must slay envy; in our tranquil demeanor and serene disposition, we must slay anger; in eating as little as we do and keeping vigil as much as we do, we must slay gluttony and somnolence; in our faithfulness to those whom we have made the mistresses of our thoughts, we must slay lewdness and lust; in wandering all over the world in search of opportunities to become famous knights as well as good Christians, we must slay sloth.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker), Sancho Panza
Part 2, Chapter 12 Quotes

With every day that passes by, dear Sancho, … you lose some foolishness and gain some sense.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker), Sancho Panza
Part 2, Chapter 29 Quotes

An ass you are, an ass you will remain and an ass you will still be when you end your days on this earth, and it is my belief that when you come to breathe your last you still will not have grasped the fact that you are an animal.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker), Sancho Panza
Part 2, Chapter 34 Quotes

Sancho Panza’s proverbs … give me more pleasure than others that are more timely and appropriate.

Related Characters: The Duke and the Duchess (speaker), Sancho Panza
Part 2, Chapter 41 Quotes

Sancho, since you want people to believe what you saw in the sky, I want you to believe what I saw in the Cave of Montesinos.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker), Sancho Panza
Part 2, Chapter 59 Quotes

Yes, you eat up, friend Sancho … sustain life, which is of more interest to you than to me, and let me die at the hands of my thoughts and in the grasp of my misfortunes. I was born, Sancho, to live dying, and you were born to die eating.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha (speaker), Sancho Panza
Part 2, Chapter 71 Quotes

They dismounted at an inn, which Don Quixote recognized as such and not as a castle with its deep moat, towers, portcullises and drawbridge; because now that he’d been defeated his judgment on all subjects was sounder, as will soon be shown.

Related Characters: Don Quixote de la Mancha, Sancho Panza
Get the entire Don Quixote LitChart as a printable PDF.
Don quixote.pdf.medium

Sancho Panza Character Timeline in Don Quixote

The timeline below shows where the character Sancho Panza appears in Don Quixote. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 1, Prologue
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
...the preface. He wants the reader’s gratitude not for Don Quixote but for the hilarious Sancho Panza. The prologue is followed by a series of poems, written by fictional and invented... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 7
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
...friends the priest and the barber and convincing a neighbor of his, a farmer called Sancho Panza, to go adventuring with him as his squire. He tells Sancho that very likely... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 8
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Soon after they leave the village, Don Quixote and Sancho come upon thirty or forty windmills. Where there are windmills, Don Quixote sees giants with... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
...replace his broken lance with a thick branch, as did some fictional knight, and tells Sancho that he will never complain about any pain. Sancho replies that he complains about all... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
...breakfast in the morning for a similar reason. In preparation for adventures, Don Quixote tells Sancho that he must not fight knights – only other squires and laymen. (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Intention and Consequence Theme Icon
...friar jumps off his mule and the other rides away as quickly as he can. Sancho starts to strip the fallen friar, considering the clothes fair spoils of battle, but the... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 9
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
...the fight between Don Quixote and the coachman. Rocinante looks very skinny and weak, and Sancho is short and round. The author notes that the following history might be inaccurate, since,... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 10
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
When Sancho sees that his master has won the fight, he comes over to ask him for... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
...eat bread or sleep with his wife until he metes out revenge on the coachman. Sancho points out that the man has probably been punished enough, and Quixote retracts his oath;... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Sancho offers Quixote some food, but he replies that knights in books eat rarely, sometimes not... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 11
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...goatherds had been boiling goat meat in a pot over a flame, and they invite Sancho and Don Quixote to share their meal. Quixote magnanimously invites Sancho to eat with him... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 12
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...all the men rail against her cruelty and coldness. After the conversation ends, Quixote and Sancho sleep in a shepherd’s hut – Quixote thinking all night of Dulcinea, Sancho snoring peacefully. (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 15
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Intention and Consequence Theme Icon
Sancho and Don Quixote spend hours looking for Marcela to offer their protection, but she seems... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Sancho and Quixote are left lying helplessly on the ground. Quixote decides that the beating is... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Don Quixote asks Sancho to put him on the donkey and try to find them a place to stay... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 16
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...beds are paltry and uncomfortable. The girls dress the guests’ wounds as best they can. Sancho explains to them that Don Quixote is a knight errant, “someone who’s being beaten up... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 17
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
The battered Don Quixote wakes up in the dark and tells Sancho in strict confidence that the beautiful princess of the castle came to his bed to... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Don Quixote decides to make some of his magic balsam, and asks Sancho to get him oil, wine, salt, and rosemary. The innkeeper gives Sancho what he asks... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Intention and Consequence Theme Icon
...such fees and quickly rides away. The innkeeper then tries to get the money from Sancho, who refuses in similar terms. Suddenly four cloth-teasers staying at the inn decide to have... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 18
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Intention and Consequence Theme Icon
...they ride away, Don Quixote says that the enchanters must have stopped him from helping Sancho, and Sancho says that with all these enchanters and misadventures maybe they should go home... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
...what didn’t exist,” Don Quixote describes in great detail the soldiers not approaching them, as Sancho listens with excitement. Suddenly, though, he hears sheep bleating and becomes suspicious. Don Quixote charges... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Sancho decides to leave Don Quixote and go home. The knight perceives his squire’s unhappiness and... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 19
Intention and Consequence Theme Icon
...explains that he had no choice but to attack a group that looked so suspicious. Sancho takes some of the group’s food and decides to rename his master Knight of the... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 20
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
Quixote and Sancho hear the sound of rushing water, along with a frightening pounding noise. Don Quixote declares... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
To pass the time, Sancho tells a story about a shepherd in love with a shepherdess. She made him so... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
At this point nature calls to Sancho, but he’s too frightened to wander off, so he tries to relieve himself very quietly... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...used in cloth-making). They laugh at their foolishness, though Quixote is also embarrassed and angry. Sancho mocks Quixote’s earlier overblown pronouncements on courage and destiny so much that the knight hits... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 21
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Intention and Consequence Theme Icon
...a knight riding a noble steed and that the gold object is Mambrino’s helmet, though Sancho is mocking and skeptical. The man is a barber on a donkey; he’s wearing a... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
As they walk, Sancho wonders whether it wouldn’t be better for them to serve an emperor in a war.... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 23
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Sancho becomes afraid that the Holy Brotherhood will come after them. As they ride along, Quixote... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 25
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
Don Quixote retracts his request that Sancho keep quiet. Sancho asks why he had made such a fuss about a fictional queen... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...even more impressive, he says, to go mad without any particular reason. In the meantime, Sancho must deliver Dulcinea a letter in verse. Sancho complains that sometimes knight-errantry seems like a... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
...murderer Ginés de Pasamonte happens to pass by the spot in the wild sierras where Sancho and Quixote have chosen to spend the night, and he quietly steals Sancho’s donkey. Sancho... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
...Cardenio’s notebook to write a letter to Dulcinea and a warrant for three donkeys for Sancho; he asks Sancho to have the letter copied out on fine paper and to sign... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 26
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Sancho makes his way back to the inn to find something to eat. At the inn,... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 27
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
...The next day they start to find their way back to Quixote’s hiding place, with Sancho’s help. They all decide that Sancho would go on ahead to find his master and... (full context)
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
...song. They walk toward it and see a man whom they recognize as Cardenio from Sancho’s story. The priest approaches him and implores him to come back to civilization. Cardenio explains... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 29
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...their home village, and the barber tells them the strange tale of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza and describes their plan for restoring Quixote to sanity. (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
In the meantime, Sancho returns and tells them he found Quixote hungry, weak, and unwilling to return to the... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 30
Intention and Consequence Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
Sancho points out to the company that it was Don Quixote who had freed the prisoners,... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
Sancho is delighted to learn that his master will soon be emperor of a kingdom, but... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Don Quixote asks Sancho about his visit to Dulcinea. But suddenly they see Ginés de Pasamonte riding toward them... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 31
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Quixote says Sancho must have found Dulcinea sorting gold or pearls, but Sancho pretends that she was sieving... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Sancho asks him why he embarrasses the discreet Dulcinea by sending all these people to her... (full context)
Intention and Consequence Theme Icon
...to punish the cruel master – just after he fulfills his vow to the princess. Sancho gives the boy some bread and cheese, and Andrés asks Quixote never to help him... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 35
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
The story is almost over when Sancho runs in yelling that Don Quixote has been battling a heavily bleeding giant in his... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 37
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
Everyone cries in joy except Sancho, who suddenly realizes that Dorotea is not really a princess and can’t give him any... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 44
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Intention and Consequence Theme Icon
...arrives at the inn – barber # 2, from whom Quixote stole Mambrino’s helmet and Sancho stole a pack-saddle. Barber 2 recognizes Sancho and cries thief, but Sancho explains that the... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 46
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...so astonished by his madness that they satisfy themselves instead by ending the fight between Sancho and the barber: they return the pack-saddle to the barber, and the priest pays him... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
Here, Sancho interrupts to say that Dorotea can’t be a real princess, since she has been kissing... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 47
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
...has gradually changed – whether new versions have been invented to suit the present time. Sancho doubts that Quixote’s abductors are ghosts, because they are clearly men of flesh and blood,... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
...expert. Don Quixote explains that he has been placed into the cage by enchanters, but Sancho interrupts to say that in his opinion his master is not enchanted at all, because... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 48
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
...point, the canon joins the priest and company for a meal in a pretty valley. Sancho comes over to Quixote’s cage and whispers to him that his captors are merely the... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 49
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
Sancho tells Quixote triumphantly that enchanted people don’t have that need, and therefore he must not... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 50
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...that he can help his friends – for one thing, he’ll be able to give Sancho an island. (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
...the bushes. They invite him to sit and eat with them and tell his story. Sancho decides to go off and eat a pie all by himself, while Quixote declares he... (full context)
Part 1, Chapter 52
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Intention and Consequence Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
Sancho sees that his master is not moving and begins crying, lamenting, and singing his praises:... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 2
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
The two concerned women are trying to stop Sancho Panza from coming into the house, worried that he will remind Quixote of his old... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Sancho and Quixote are also discussing their complementarity: Quixote explains to Sancho that master and servant... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 3
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
Sancho leaves to get the student who had told him about the book. Quixote is surprised... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
Carrasco tells Sancho that he is also an important and beloved character in the book, which is read... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 4
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
Sancho explains that his donkey was stolen the night after the adventure with the dead body,... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Sancho is concerned that his master attacks too freely and irresponsibly, and warns Quixote and Carrasco... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 5
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...that he considers the events of the chapter to be mere invention, because they show Sancho speaking too wisely and sensibly. Sancho comes home in a very happy mood and tells... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
They bicker for a while but they stick to their positions. Sancho explains that the present matters more than the past, and one’s good deeds and fine... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 6
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...and since arms are his calling, they must not stand in his way. Just then, Sancho comes to speak to his master. (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 7
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...to stop Quixote from running away again. Carrasco promises to do all he can. Meanwhile, Sancho tells Quixote that he’s ready to go looking for new adventures. Quixote corrects his vocabulary... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
As Sancho processes his disappointment, Carrasco comes in and ceremoniously encourages Quixote to set off on his... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 8
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Quixote tells Sancho that he wants to receive Dulcinea’s blessing before beginning any new quests, and asks Sancho... (full context)
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...must battle not only villains but also the seven deadly sins within and without him. Sancho asks him whether it would not be easier become famous and secure a spot in... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 9
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
At midnight, the two friends enter the town. Quixote asks Sancho to lead them to Dulcinea’s palace; Sancho, who has never been to see Dulcinea, evades... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
...to the house of the village priest, who has a list of El Toboso’s inhabitants. Sancho convinces Quixote to spend the night in the forest outside the village, and promises to... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 10
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
...film on top of them, no matter how absurd they may be. In the morning, Sancho leaves to find Dulcinea in order to arrange a discreet meeting. As soon as he... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Sancho sits by the tree for another few hours; as soon as he sees three peasant... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 11
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Sancho tries to cheer up his master, but with little success. Fortunately, they are distracted by... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
...flings Quixote to the ground. Quixote wants to punish the actors for their impudence, but Sancho reminds him that everyone loves actors and protects them. When Quixote shouts threats at the... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 12
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
...spoils had he attacked the actors, like the queen’s crown and the angel’s wings, but Sancho reminds him that actors’ props are made of tinsel, not real gold. Quixote sadly compares... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 13
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...Forest mentions that his master is only pretending to be insane to help another knight. Sancho replies that his master is all innocence and kindness, though he is silly and easily... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 14
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...their squires and tell them to get ready for the battle. When it becomes light, Sancho notices that the Squire of the Forest has an enormous, hideous purple nose and climbs... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 16
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Quixote is overjoyed by his recent victory. He and Sancho discuss whether the knight and squire were really Carrasco and Tomé Cecial, as they appeared... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 17
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Intention and Consequence Theme Icon
...thinks that everything that comes his way is an adventure. During his master’s long speech, Sancho had wandered off to buy curds from some shepherds. When Quixote calls him over he... (full context)
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Intention and Consequence Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...asks if he can first take himself and his animals to a safe distance, and Sancho and Don Diego follow suit. “O you of little faith!” says he in response to... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 19
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
On the road, Sancho and Quixote encounter a group of two students and two farmers. One of the students... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 20
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
In the morning Quixote walks over to wake up Sancho, saying to himself that the simple, innocent person sleeps best and lives most happily. Sancho... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 21
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Quixote and Sancho admire the bride and groom. As they approach, a man dressed in black and red... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...conciliatory speech and his sword. Camacho decides to throw the party anyway, and Quixote and Sancho follow the bride and groom to Basilio’s village, though Sancho is sad to leave the... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 23
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...thirty minutes, but Quixote explains that he was there for three days and three nights. Sancho does not believe Quixote’s story, but he doesn’t suggest that his master’s lying: rather, he... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 25
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
...future, but Master Pedro explains that the ape only answers about past and present events. Sancho asks the ape to tell him about his wife Teresa, and the ape jumps on... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Quixote is impressed by the ape’s skill but tells Sancho that Master Pedro must have made a deal with the devil. Quixote also asks the... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 26
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Intention and Consequence Theme Icon
...have been good, but the fact of the matter is that Quixote destroyed his livelihood. Sancho interrupts to say that his master is kind and generous and will pay for all... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
...puppets are real people, but he pays Master Pedro what he owes him. He and Sancho leave the inn early the following morning. (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 27
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Don Quixote and Sancho spend three days on the road. On the third day they run into a noisy... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 28
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
Sancho is angry that Quixote did not defend him from the villagers, but Quixote explains that... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 29
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
...small boat, which he takes to mean that someone is calling for his help. Despite Sancho’s objections, they tie their animals to a tree and board the boat, which floats off... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
They see some water-mills in the middle of the river. Quixote explains to Sancho that though they look like water mills, they are really a city that the enchanters... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 30
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
The next day, Sancho and Quixote run into some falconers and a beautiful lady on horseback. Sancho introduces himself... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 31
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
Don Quixote is escorted into a beautiful private suite. He finds Sancho and scolds him for his rudeness, warning that his bad behavior might make Quixote look... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 32
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...to wander the world helping people, which is always his intention. The angry priest asks Sancho whether he is the squire that was promised an island, and Sancho answers defensively in... (full context)
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...fine silver pots and towels and wash Quixote’s beard, as a prank. They also take Sancho away to be washed, at his request. (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
The Duchess assures Quixote that she believes that Dulcinea is real, but she wonders why Sancho found her sieving buckwheat – not a very noble occupation. Quixote answers that he believes... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 33
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
The Duchess asks Sancho whether he ever delivered the message to Dulcinea, and whether he completely invented her reply.... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
The Duchess implies that someone who obeys a madman must be mad himself, and Sancho explains that he is too fond of his master to abandon him. The Duchess tells... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 34
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
...the boar to a nearby clearing, where a meal has been laid out for them. Sancho says in a long-winded speech sprinkled with proverbs that hunting seems like a cruel amusement.... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 35
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
...and recites verses that describe Dulcinea’s enchantment and explain that she will be disenchanted if Sancho lashes himself three thousand and three hundred times. Sancho is outraged and refuses to lash... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 36
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...and their butler. Since it was so amusing, they planned another for the following day. Sancho asks the Duchess to proofread his letter to his wife. In the letter, he describes... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 37
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
Sancho does not want Quixote to take on this quest, because he is suspicious of duennas... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 41
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
...blindfolded to avoid dizziness, since the horse will fly high above the ground. At first Sancho is unwilling to risk his life to help duennas, but once again the Duke makes... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
...goodbyes and exclaiming how high and how quickly they are flying – just like Icarus! Sancho says that he can feel the cool wind whistling, since people in the garden are... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
...original states. Quixote wakes up the Duke and Duchess and tells them the good news. Sancho tells the Duchess that he sneaked a look under his blindfold and saw the earth... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 42
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
The Duke and Duchess enjoyed the adventures so much that they decide to give Sancho his island right away. Sancho is delighted by the news, and the governor predicts that... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 43
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Intention and Consequence Theme Icon
In the last chapter Quixote advised Sancho about his soul, and here he advises him about his body. He tells Sancho to... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 44
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
That same night, the Duke sends Sancho with a large retinue to his island. The retinue is led by the inventive butler... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
As soon as Sancho leaves for his island, Quixote misses him so much that he becomes visibly melancholy. He... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 45
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
Sancho arrives at a flourishing town of five thousand people called Baratario, which the Duke tells... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Intention and Consequence Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...that he repaid the other, but asks him to hold his cane as he swears. Sancho is satisfied by the oath and lets them go, but calls them back at the... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Intention and Consequence Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...but she decided to drag him to court. He swears he did not rape her. Sancho takes all the money in the herdsman’s wallet and gives it to the woman, who... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 46
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
...and she thinks of another prank. She also sends a messenger to Teresa Panza carrying Sancho’s letter and riding costume. (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 47
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
After Sancho deliberates in the courtroom, he is taken to a dining room in a beautiful palace.... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Just then, a messenger arrives; he’s carrying a note from the Duke informing Sancho that enemies will soon attack the island and that Sancho’s life might be in danger.... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 49
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
Sancho realizes that the job of governor and judge is difficult and exhausting. He finally eats... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
After he finishes his dinner, Sancho and his servants go out to make the nightly rounds. They hear two people fighting... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
...so they assumed he was doing something illegal. The curt young man cleverly avoids answering Sancho’s questions, and Sancho threatens to make him sleep in jail. The young man swears that... (full context)
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...A few more constables come by with her brother, who is dressed in woman’s clothes. Sancho chastises the girl for her melodramatic speeches and escorts them both home. (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 50
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...her for telling unflattering tales. While Quixote recovers, the Duchess sends a page to deliver Sancho’s letter, his travelling suit, and a string of corals to his wife Teresa. He arrives... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...one of Quixote’s fantasies, but the page replies that he is a real page, and Sancho is a real governor, etc. (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 51
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Intention and Consequence Theme Icon
On the second day of his governing, Sancho eats a meager breakfast and goes into the courtroom. A man comes in and begins... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Intention and Consequence Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
Sancho eats a hearty lunch and then reads a letter from Don Quixote that contains more... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 52
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...the two women leave, the messenger brings in Teresa’s letters to the Duchess and to Sancho. The Duchess reads the letters out loud for everyone’s amusement. In the letter to the... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 53
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Sancho is in bed on the seventh night of his tenure as governor when he hears... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 54
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...decide that a lackey should take the place of the seducer in the duel. Meanwhile, Sancho is travelling to the Duke’s palace on his donkey. He comes across six pilgrims, who... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...group of pilgrims to dig up his hidden treasure and collect his family from Algiers. Sancho tells him that his treasure might not be there, because many jewels were confiscated from... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 55
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
When it gets dark, Sancho and his donkey fall into a wide pit on the side of the road. They... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 57
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
...life in the castle and decides to take to the road. One morning he and Sancho gather his belongings and ride out into the courtyard, where they hear Altisidora sing a... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 58
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...delighted to be on the road once again, free from love affairs, luxuries, and obligations. Sancho is happy because the butler gave him two hundred escudos for emergencies. They come across... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
The men ride away, and Sancho tells his master that this was the gentlest adventure they’ve ever had. Quixote agrees and... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 59
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Sancho and Quixote wash off the road dust in a stream. Sancho wants to have lunch,... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
...volume of the history. Quixote looks through it and makes several criticisms – it calls Sancho’s wife Mari Gutiérrez, when in reality her name is Teresa. (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
They continue talking over dinner. Don Jerónimo says that the second book depicts Sancho as an unfunny glutton. Sancho tells the gentlemen that the Sancho and Quixote in the... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 60
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
The two friends travel uneventfully for six days. On the night of the sixth day Sancho quickly falls asleep and Quixote stays up thinking about Dulcinea. He rouses Sancho and tries... (full context)
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...writes a letter to his friend in Barcelona to say that the wonderful Quixote and Sancho are on their way there, and asks his friend to welcome them. (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 61
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
Sancho and Quixote travel with Captain Roque and his band for three adventure-filled days and nights.... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 62
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
...bust three questions: were the adventures of the Cave of Montesinos real or dreamt? Will Sancho lash himself? Will Dulcinea be disenchanted? The bust replies that the adventure contained both reality... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 63
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
Later that same day, Don Antonio takes Quixote and Sancho to see the galleys. The men lift anchor and the ship quickly sails out to... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 64
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
Quixote offers to go rescue Don Gaspar himself, but Sancho and the others convince him it would not be practical. Two days later, the renegade... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 65
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...King of Spain was right to cleanse the country so completely. In a few days Sancho and Quixote leave Barcelona and begin travelling back to their village. (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 66
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
Sancho tries to cheer up Quixote by blaming their misfortune on fate, but Quixote tells him... (full context)
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...man claims that the skinny man should carry in iron the difference between their weights. Sancho determines that the fat man should instead lose weight, so that he and his opponent... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
...does not want to eat with this messenger who pretends not to be enchanted, but Sancho eats with a good appetite. In a little while, the travellers take to the road. (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 67
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Quixote asks Sancho whether the lackey mentioned anything about Altisidora. He is grateful for her love, though he... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...they met the party of pretend shepherds and shepherdesses, and Quixote decides that he and Sancho will also become shepherds for their year at home. They’ll adjust their names and choose... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 68
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Quixote rouses Sancho and urges him to give himself some lashes. Sancho grumbles and waves his master away,... (full context)
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
...friends, and Quixote explains sadly that they must be divine punishment for an unworthy knight. Sancho falls back asleep while Quixote sings a song he wrote about seeking death, and death’s... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 69
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
The men carry Don Quixote and Sancho into a dark, torch-lit courtyard. In the middle of the courtyard, they see a platform... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 70
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
...report on the results of his venture. When the Duke found out that Quixote and Sancho would be travelling home near the castle, he planned this one final hoax with Altisidora.... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Meanwhile, Altisidora steals into the friends’ room, where Sancho is sleeping soundly and Quixote is lying awake. She tells Quixote that his neglect killed... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
...give Altisidora useful tasks to distract her from her infatuations. They agree that Quixote and Sancho will leave the following day. (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 71
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Quixote is depressed to have to return to his village, but thrilled that Sancho is capable of resurrection (it was not too difficult to convince himself that Altisidora had... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
...he’d lived in the same age as they did, so that he could save them. Sancho predicts that soon inns will have paintings of their adventures on their walls. (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 72
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
The following day, Quixote and Sancho overhear a servant address a guest at the inn with the name Don Tarfe –... (full context)
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
...tells Don Tarfe about his recent adventures and then they part ways. Later that night, Sancho lashes nearby trees until he finally completes his punishment. Quixote is overjoyed, and in the... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 73
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
...about Dulcinea. A hare running from dogs and hunters gives Quixote the same impression, though Sancho says it could mean that Dulcinea has escaped from evil enchanters. The two boys tell... (full context)
Part 2, Chapter 74
Truth and Lies Theme Icon
Literature, Realism, and Idealism Theme Icon
Madness and Sanity Theme Icon
Self-Invention, Class Identity, and Social Change Theme Icon
...announces his imminent death, and everyone starts crying. Quixote leaves part of his money to Sancho and apologizes to him for involving him in his madness. Sancho begs his master not... (full context)