I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

by

Maryse Condé

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem can help.
Iphigene is a young, enslaved man who, after being nearly beaten to death by a plantation overseer, ends up in Tituba’s care. At first, Tituba views Iphigene like a son, and the two bond over having lost their mothers to white violence in childhood; by the end of the novel, however, Tituba and Iphigene (whom Tituba frequently describes as “beautiful”) become lovers. With Tituba’s urging, Iphigene also becomes the leader of a massive slave rebellion—but before he can successfully complete his plan, Iphigene is thwarted and killed by white soldiers. Fortunately, though, he and Tituba remain close, even in the afterlife.

Iphigene Quotes in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

The I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem quotes below are all either spoken by Iphigene or refer to Iphigene . For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Surviving vs. Enduring Theme Icon
).
Part 2: Chapter 14 Quotes

When I got to the burning of Benjamin Cohen d’Azevedo’s house, he interrupted me with a frown: “But why? Wasn't he white like the others? […] Do they need to hate so much that they hate each other?”

Related Characters: Tituba (speaker), Iphigene (speaker), Benjamin Cohen d’Azevedo
Page Number: 160
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem LitChart as a printable PDF.
I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem PDF

Iphigene Character Timeline in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem

The timeline below shows where the character Iphigene appears in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 2: Chapter 14
Nature as Knowledge Theme Icon
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
Soon after, an enslaved man named Iphigene who has been beaten by a white overseer is brought to Tituba’s door; he is... (full context)
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
Tituba learns that Iphigene’s father is the famed Ti-Noel; his mother was enslaved, and like Abena, she was raped... (full context)
Surviving vs. Enduring Theme Icon
Iphigene begins to plan this revolt. Though she supports the idea, Tituba takes a backseat to... (full context)
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
Iphigene also asks Tituba to go to Christopher to prevent the maroons from interfering; he explains... (full context)
Surviving vs. Enduring Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
...into her room like “three birds of prey” and assault her. She wakes up to Iphigene comforting her. But when Tituba wants to consult the spirits for guidance, Iphigene gets frustrated.... (full context)
Part 2: Chapter 15
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
...on with her story, as she feels that it is “predictable.” But she continues anyway: Iphigene has planned well, staking out the various plantations and getting the necessary guns and fighters.... (full context)
Nature as Knowledge Theme Icon
That afternoon, Iphigene brings Tituba a rabbit to sacrifice. When she goes to kill the animal, however, she... (full context)
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
...Tituba (and to chastise her, once again, for always focusing on men). Around 8 o’clock, Iphigene brings Tituba dinner. After they eat, Iphigene touches her, and they begin to make love;... (full context)
Desire, Patriarchy and the Difficulty of Feminism Theme Icon
After she and Iphigene have sex, Tituba begins to feel guilty, as the young boy could be her son.... (full context)
Slavery and Daily Life  Theme Icon
Nature as Knowledge Theme Icon
...the smoke in her dream is real, and that her cabin is burning; she and Iphigene have been betrayed. She is reminded of her time in New England, when the house... (full context)
Surviving vs. Enduring Theme Icon
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
...every suspect Black person, taking them to a clearing filled with dozens of makeshift gallows. Iphigene is the first to be hanged, but before he is killed, Tituba promises him they... (full context)
Epilogue
Nature as Knowledge Theme Icon
Archival History vs. Memory Theme Icon
...is never alone; she is joined by the spirits of Mama Yaya, Yao, Abena, and Iphigene. But more than that, Tituba has at last “become one” with Barbados itself, in a... (full context)