The Brothers Karamazov

The Brothers Karamazov

by

Fyodor Dostoevsky

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Ippolit Kirillovich Character Analysis

The deputy prosecutor, usually referred to simply as “the prosecutor.” He has no surname and is married to “a rather fat and childless lady. When he arrives to arrest Dmitri Fyodorovich, he is described as “the trim, ‘consumptive’ fop” in “well-polished boots.” He participates in Dmitri’s interrogation, along with Nikolai Parfenovich. He is only thirty-five, but he lacks good health due to susceptibility to “consumption,” or tuberculosis. He is described as intelligent and has “a kind soul,” though he is also “proud and irritable.” He has a lofty opinion of himself that doesn’t match his true virtues. This high personal opinion, particularly regarding his understanding of the human character, leads him to think that he’s underappreciated in his profession, and that he has enemies. He’s eager to take on the Karamazov case because he thinks that it could become known all over Russia, thereby helping with his reputation. He dies of “acute consumption” nine months after the Karamazov trial.

Ippolit Kirillovich Quotes in The Brothers Karamazov

The The Brothers Karamazov quotes below are all either spoken by Ippolit Kirillovich or refer to Ippolit Kirillovich. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Faith vs. Reason Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Farrar, Straus and Giroux edition of The Brothers Karamazov published in 1990.
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 6 Quotes

“Gentlemen of the jury,” the prosecutor began, “the present case has resounded throughout Russia. But what, one might think, is so surprising, what is so especially horrifying about it? For us, for us especially? We’re so used to all that! And here is the real horror, that such dark affairs have almost ceased to horrify us! It is this, and not the isolated crime of one individual or another, that should horrify us: that we are so used to it. Where lie the reasons for our indifference, our lukewarm attitude towards such affairs, such signs of the times, which prophesy for us an unenviable future? In our cynicism, in an early exhaustion of mind and imagination in our society, so young and yet so prematurely decrepit? In our moral principles, shattered to their foundations, or, finally, in the fact that we, perhaps, are not even possessed of such moral principles at all?”

Page Number: 693
Explanation and Analysis:

“For now we are either horrified or pretend that we are horrified, while, on the contrary, relishing the spectacle, like lovers of strong, eccentric sensations that stir our cynical and lazy idleness, or, finally, like little children waving the frightening ghosts away, and hiding our heads under the pillow until the frightening vision is gone, so as to forget it immediately afterwards in games and merriment. But should not we, too, some day begin to live soberly and thoughtfully; should not we, too, take a look at ourselves as a society; should not we, too, understand at least something of our social duty, or at least begin to understand? A great writer of the previous epoch, in the finale of the greatest of his works, personifying all of Russia as a bold Russian troika galloping towards an unknown goal, exclaims: ‘Ah, troika, bird-troika, who invented you!—and in proud rapture adds that all nations respectfully stand aside for this troika galloping by at breakneck speed.”

Page Number: 695
Explanation and Analysis:
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Ippolit Kirillovich Character Timeline in The Brothers Karamazov

The timeline below shows where the character Ippolit Kirillovich appears in The Brothers Karamazov. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Part 3: Book 9, Chapter 2: The Alarm
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
...there will be others at the police commissioner’s that evening. Varvinsky, the district doctor, and Ippolit Kirillovich , the deputy prosecutor that everyone calls the prosecutor. The young district attorney, Nikolai Parfenovich... (full context)
Part 3: Book 9, Chapter 3: The Soul’s Journey through Torments. The First Torment.
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Ippolit Kirillovich goes on to say that Grigory has given them important evidence regarding Dmitri. Dmitri then... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
...no secret that he wanted his father dead. He then asks how Fyodor was killed. Ippolit Kirillovich says that they found the old man on his back, “with his head smashed in.”... (full context)
Part 3: Book 9, Chapter 4: The Second Torment
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
...he went to Samsonov to borrow three thousand roubles from him “on the best security.” Ippolit Kirillovich asks why he needed that amount. Dmitri calls this detail a trifle and doesn’t answer.... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
...and record that he took the pestle to kill his father, if that’ll please them. Ippolit Kirillovich expresses understanding but tells him that it’s essential that they hear the story. Dmitri repeats... (full context)
Part 3: Book 9, Chapter 5: The Third Torment
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
The prosecutor Ippolit Kirillovich asks Dmitri if he noticed that the door to the garden was open. Dmitri says... (full context)
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Ippolit Kirillovich asks Dmitri what “signals” he’s talking about. Dmitri toys with them and says that he... (full context)
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...Fenya with his hands covered in blood. Dmitri says that he didn’t notice the blood. Ippolit Kirillovich mentions that such a thing is plausible. Dmitri then tells them that he decided to... (full context)
Part 3: Book 9, Chapter 6: The Prosecutor Catches Mitya
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Dmitri submits to the strip-search, though with feelings of “pride and contempt.” Nikolai Parfenovich and Ippolit Kirillovich go behind the curtain with him, along with several peasants, who seem to be there... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Ippolit Kirillovich informs Dmitri that it was Grigory who told them that the door to the garden... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Ippolit Kirillovich reminds Dmitri that there was no need to give signals if the door was already... (full context)
Part 3: Book 9, Chapter 7: Mitya’s Great Secret. Met with Hisses.
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
...thousand roubles during his first spree in Mokroye. Dmitri says it was only fifteen hundred. Ippolit Kirillovich asks if there’s anyone else who would know about this circumstance. Dmitri says that he... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
...but still not a thief. With that, he could return the other half to her. Ippolit Kirillovich fails to see this as “a fatal difference,” but Dmitri thinks that it is, because,... (full context)
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Ippolit Kirillovich expresses sympathy for Dmitri. Then, he asks why he couldn’t have just asked Katerina Ivanovna... (full context)
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Ippolit Kirillovich asks Dmitri if the amulet he wore was very big. Dmitri says it wasn’t. He... (full context)
Part 3: Book 9, Chapter 8: The Evidence of the Witnesses. The Wee One.
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
...that the remainder of the three thousand roubles he would give were in his town. Ippolit Kirillovich thinks that some of the money may have been in town, or even in Mokroye,... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
...about the sum. She confirms, too, that she heard him mention the number many times. Ippolit Kirillovich is very pleased to hear this evidence. She also says that she knew the money... (full context)
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 1: The Fatal Day
Morality and Modernization Theme Icon
...by the arrival of the famous lawyer Fetyukovich, whose legal talents are widely known. Supposedly, Ippolit Kirillovich fears going against the famed defense attorney, who may cause the prosecutor to lose the... (full context)
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 5: A Sudden Catastrophe
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
...the public. The letter is added to material evidence. At eight o’clock in the evening, Ippolit Kirillovich begins his statement for the prosecution. (full context)
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 6: The Prosecutor’s Speech. Characterizations
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Morality and Modernization Theme Icon
Ippolit Kirillovich talks about how the Karamazov case has resounded throughout Russia. However, there’s nothing particularly “horrifying”... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Morality and Modernization Theme Icon
Ippolit Kirillovich says that the public is “horrified” by the Karamazov case or, rather, pretends to be,... (full context)
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Family Theme Icon
Ippolit Kirillovich then recounts the history of the Karamazov family, how Fyodor was born into nobility but... (full context)
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 7: A Historical Survey
Jealousy and Envy Theme Icon
Suffering Theme Icon
Ippolit Kirillovich says that the medical experts tried to claim that Dmitri is a madman, while he... (full context)
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 8: A Treatise on Smerdyakov
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On the subject of Smerdyakov, Ippolit Kirillovich says that Dmitri was the first to cry out that the lackey was the true... (full context)
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Ippolit Kirillovich then encourages everyone to “lay aside psychology” and focus on the facts. How would Smerdyakov... (full context)
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In regard to the money that Ivan presented, Ippolit Kirillovich insists that it’s no proof. Having the three thousand roubles doesn’t prove that it came... (full context)
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 9: Psychology at Full Steam. The Galloping Troika. The Finale of the Prosecutor’s Speech
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Ippolit Kirillovich describes Dmitri as someone who always lives in the present. The prosecutor says that Dmitri... (full context)
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Dmitri, Ippolit Kirillovich says, only considered himself guilty for the supposed murder of Grigory. The prosecutor claims that... (full context)
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 10: The Defense Attorney’s Speech. A Stick with Two Ends
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
...describes Dmitri as “a man of stormy and unbridled character.” He takes issue, however, with Ippolit Kirillovich ’s claim that Dmitri couldn’t have been expressing sensitivity toward Grigory after striking him. He... (full context)
Part 4: Book 12, Chapter 14: Our Peasants Stood Up for Themselves
Innocence and Guilt Theme Icon
Fetyukovich concludes his speech to “the rapture” of his listeners. Just then Ippolit Kirillovich stands to object. People glare at him hatefully for daring to do so. He mentions... (full context)