The 57 Bus

The 57 Bus

by

Dashka Slater

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Richard Character Analysis

The antagonist of The 57 Bus and Jasmine’s son. As a prank, Richard lights Sasha’s skirt on fire aboard the 57 bus and is subsequently arrested and charged with two hate-crimes, but his fate is sealed long before this senseless and discriminatory act. Richard comes from the “flatlands of East Oakland,” and his black skin means that he is vulnerable to the systemic and institutionalized racism that plagues Oakland’s society. By the age of sixteen, Richard has already served time in a group home, and several of his friends have been sent to prison, or worse, have been killed in the violence that is commonplace in Oakland. Still, Richard is committed to making something of himself. He wants to graduate and make his mother proud, and he never intends to hurt Sasha when they become the object of his foolish prank that day on the bus. As an African American, Richard is more likely to be charged as an adult for crimes committed as a juvenile, and he is more likely to serve time for those crimes than his white counterparts, and this indeed proves true after he is arrested for Sasha’s attack. Society is already convinced that Richard is a “criminal,” and the justice system is likewise convinced that prison is the best environment for him. Richard, however, is deeply remorseful for his actions, and he doesn’t even know why he targeted Sasha in the first place. Sasha and their family are accepting of his apologies. They believe that Richard never wanted to hurt Sasha, and they are able to find closure and positive healing despite the ongoing debacle that is Richard’s legal experience. Richard represents what is possible within juvenile criminal justice if alternative forms of justice are considered. Richard isn’t an inherently bad person, and he doesn’t truly belong in prison, Slater argues. His meaningful rehabilitation and redemption independent of his prison stay suggest that “punitiveness for its own sake” is not necessary for criminal justice to be achieved, especially in juvenile cases.

Richard Quotes in The 57 Bus

The The 57 Bus quotes below are all either spoken by Richard or refer to Richard. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Gender and Sexuality Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Macmillan edition of The 57 Bus published in 2017.
Oakland, California Quotes

Oakland, California is a city of more than 400,000 people, but it can still feel like a small town. Not small geographically, of course. The city sprawls across seventy-eight square miles, stretching from the shallow, salty estuary at the edge of San Francisco Bay to the undulating green-and-gold hills where bobcats and coyotes roam. What makes it feel small is the web of connections, the way people stories tangle together. Our lives make footprints, tracks in the snows of time. People know each other’s parents or siblings, their aunties and cousins. They go to school together, or worship together. They play sports on the same team, or work in the same building. The tracks cross. The stories overlap.

Related Characters: Sasha, Richard
Page Number: 6
Explanation and Analysis:

Gravity works backward here—the money flows uphill. The wealthier neighborhoods in the hills boast good schools, low crime, and views of the bay. Thanks to the Bay Area’s high-tech boom, long-vacant historic buildings downtown are filling with start-ups, boutiques peddling handmade jeans, and nightspots serving seven-ingredient cocktail. But little of this good fortune spilled over into the flatlands of East Oakland, where Richard lived. This is where the bulk of the city’s murders happen—two-thirds of them, in 2013. The schools are shabbier here; the scores are lower. There’s more trash on the streets, more roaming dogs, more liquor stores, fewer groceries stores. The median strips are ragged with weeds.

Related Characters: Richard
Page Number: 7
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 2: Oakland High School Quotes

Of course, you rarely notice when you come to the fork in the road. It just feels like another day. A day when you didn’t go to school because you were sick or your baby sister was sick, or you didn’t study for that test so why bother taking it, or your clothes looked ratty and you were tired of hearing about it, or someone was looking for you and you needed to lay low for a few days, or any of a hundred other reasons that made not going to class seem like a better choice than going. Only once you stopped going it just seemed too hard to start again. Days rolled into weeks. Weeks into months. And then at some point you realized you’d entered the future. The one you never planned on. The one where everything was going to be that much harder.

Related Characters: Richard
Page Number: 65
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 2: Hopes and Prayers Quotes

These were big dreams in her part of town. Of the roughly six hundred African American boys who started Oakland high schools as freshmen each year, only about three hundred ended up graduating. Fewer than one hundred graduated with the requirements needed to attend California state college or university. The odds of landing in the back of a police cruiser, on the other hand, were much better. African American boys made up less than 30 percent of Oakland’s underage population but accounted for nearly 75 percent of all juvenile arrests.

Related Characters: Richard, Jasmine
Page Number: 79
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 2: Where He Left Off Quotes

That’s how everyone knew Richard—as the funny one, the one who made people smile. He pulled pranks like putting ketchup on people’s faces while they slept or ambushing them with water balloons when they’d just woken up. He would do anything for a laugh—put on one of his female cousin’s sexy cropped sweaters, for example, or post a selfie on Instagram of himself dressed in a bra and a wig, gazing into the bathroom mirror with a sultry expression. I’m a THOT for Halloween, the caption explained.

Related Characters: Richard
Page Number: 82
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 3: Direct Files Quotes

“Stop right here, and for a moment imagine yourself forced to submit to being handcuffed and see what kind of feelings will be aroused in you,” a Chicago lawyer named John P. Altgeld wrote in an 1884 book called Our Penal Machinery and Its Victims. Arguing that “submission to that one act of degradation prepares many a young man for a career of crime,” he took the reader through the experience of a youthful offender—which began with the accused, usually arrested for vagrancy or disorderly conduct, spending the night in the police station among older, more vicious criminals. He compared the criminal justice system to “a great mill which, somehow or other, supplies its own grist, a maelstrom with draws from the outside, and then keeps its victims moving in a circle until swallowed in the vortex.”

Related Characters: Richard
Page Number: 161
Explanation and Analysis:

“A super-predator is a young juvenile criminal who is so impulsive, so remorseless, that he can kill, rape, maim without giving it a second thought,” he explained. And he warned that the numbers of these “fatherless, Godless, and jobless” teens were growing. By the mid-2000s, he predicted, their numbers would double or even triple, unleashing a tidal wave of violence across the nation. “As many as half of these juvenile super-predators could be young black males,” Dilulio wrote in 1996 article entitled “My Black Crime Problem, and Ours.”

Related Characters: Richard
Page Number: 162
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 3: The Second Letter Quotes

“I am not a thug, gangster, hoodlum, nor monster. Im a young African American male who’s made a terrible mistake. Not only did I hurt you but I hurt your family & friends and also my family & friends for I have brought shame to them and our country and I shall be punished which is going to be hard for me because I’m not made to be incarcerated.”

Related Characters: Richard (speaker), Sasha, Bill Du Bois
Page Number: 185
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 3: Y’All Don’t Know Quotes

“People have different habitats,” he explained. “Some people have it better than others. They grew up in good neighborhoods. Their family has jobs. They have good income. They don’t understand. Their life is so good, they think everybody’s life is good. They don’t understand the struggles people go through. I don’t know where you grew up at, if it’s like a low-income area, where there’s lots of violence and crime. But if you grew up in a low-income area and all you see is crime and drugs? If you have family that does crime? You see it. It has an impact on you. If you’re around it a lot, it’s hard to do good.”

Related Characters: Richard, Kaprice Wilson
Page Number: 197
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 3: God Is Good Quotes

Donald Williams Jr., an African American freshman at San Jose Sate University, had been relentlessly bullied by the white students he lived with a four-bedroom dormitory suite. The white kids, also freshmen, had insisted on calling Williams “three-fifths,” a reference to the clause in the original US Constitution that counted slaves as three-fifths of a person when determining population for representation in Congress. They clamped a bike lock around his neck and claimed to have lost the key. They wrote Nigger on a whiteboard and draped a Confederate flag over a cardboard cutout of Elvis Presley in suite’s living room. They locked him in his room. And they claimed it was all just a series of good-natured pranks. In the end, three eighteen-year-old white students were expelled for what they did to Williams, and a seventeen-year-old was suspended. The three who were expelled were also charged in criminal court. The charge: misdemeanor battery with a hate-crime enhancement, which carried a maximum penalty of a year and a half in county jail. A jury eventually convicted all three of battery but acquitted one of the students of the hate-crime charge and deadlocked the others.

Related Characters: Richard, Jasmine, Regis
Page Number: 79
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 4: Restorative Justice Quotes

“RJ isn’t a guarantee of leniency,” Baliga cautioned. “It’s about dispensing with punitiveness for its own sake and trying to produce an outcome that will be more healing for everyone involved.”

Still, Baliga knew that there was little hope of diverting Richard from the criminal justice system entirely. “Given the severity of the harm to Sasha, we didn’t expect that the DA would allow the case to be diverted to restorative justice,” she said.

But if anyone seemed right for restorative justice, it was these two families, who had already expressed compassion for one another. “They were perfect candidates for this dialogue,” she said. “All of them were such gorgeously enlightened, beautiful people.”

Related Characters: Sujatha Baliga (speaker), Sasha, Richard, Debbie, Karl, Jasmine
Page Number: 241
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 4: Maybe Quotes

The fire was becoming a more distant memory, even though Sasha still wore compression stockings. “Apart from some scars, I’m all healed, basically,” Sasha said. It was hard for people to believe it, but Sasha didn’t feel traumatized by what had happened. When the physical pain faded, the emotional pain did as well.

“I don’t really feel hated, Sasha explained. “Especially since after I was attacked, the whole world was supporting me. I felt like one person hates me—maybe.”

Related Characters: Sasha (speaker), Richard
Page Number: 248
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 4: Victim-Impact Statement Quotes

“We do not understand your actions,” Debbie went on. “But we also think that hatred only leads to more hatred and anger. We don’t want you to come out of prison full of hate. Following the incident, communities near and far affirmed Sasha’s—and everyone’s—right to not be harassed or hurt or bullied for how they dress, or whether they are gay or trans or agender. We truly hope that you will gain some understanding and empathy in the years to come. Maybe sometime in the future you will be the one coming to the aid of someone being bullied.”

Related Characters: Debbie (speaker), Sasha, Richard
Page Number: 264
Explanation and Analysis:
Part 4: Progress Report Quotes

“From the start we have been opposed to Richard’s being tried as an adult,” he said. “His actions appear to have been impulsive, immature, and unpremeditated. He did make a big mistake and recognizes that. He asked for our forgiveness.” Karl’s voice broke. “Sasha, Debbie, and I have forgiven Richard,” he whispered. “We hope the state will focus more on preparing him for the world beyond incarceration than on punishing him.”

Related Characters: Karl (speaker), Sasha, Richard, Debbie
Page Number: 286
Explanation and Analysis:
Get the entire The 57 Bus LitChart as a printable PDF.
The 57 Bus PDF

Richard Character Timeline in The 57 Bus

The timeline below shows where the character Richard appears in The 57 Bus. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Monday, November 4, 2013
Gender and Sexuality Theme Icon
Discrimination and Social Justice Theme Icon
Richard, a sixteen-year-old junior from Oakland High School, stands nearby wearing a black hoodie and baseball... (full context)
Discrimination and Social Justice Theme Icon
...will be severely burned and require multiple surgeries at a San Francisco burn unit, and Richard will be arrested and charged with two felony hate-crimes. If Richard is convicted of hate-crimes,... (full context)
Oakland, California
Discrimination and Social Justice Theme Icon
...places in the Bay Area have experienced an economic resurgence, this means very little to Richard, who lives in “the flatlands of East Oakland.” Two-thirds of the city’s murders happen in... (full context)
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...hills to city’s flatlands, and it also passes through Sasha’s middle-class neighborhood. Oakland High, where Richard goes to school, is in the heart of Sasha’s neighborhood, and the bus route “terminates”... (full context)
Part 2: Book of Faces
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In a poem, Slater describes pictures of Richard that he has up loaded onto his Facebook page. The poem has several verses, and... (full context)
Adolescent Crime vs. Adult Crime Theme Icon
The pictures reflect Richard at different times in his life, “At fourteen, in a beanie: / round-faced, bright-eyed,” and... (full context)
Accountability, Redemption, and Forgiveness Theme Icon
The pictures also depict Richard’s life with his friends. “Standing with Skeet, spines straight, / chins up, peas in a... (full context)
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But, Slater writes, “None of it captures / how [Richard] looks in conversation / how his eye hold your eyes, / seeing you see him.... (full context)
Part 2: First Day
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This chapter is another poem, this time about Richard’s first day at Oakland High School. Slater’s poem is one solid verse of fourteen lines,... (full context)
Part 2: An Old Friend
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Richard’s childhood friend Cherie talks about Richard’s first day at Oakland High. He didn’t attend the... (full context)
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“[Richard] gets on my nerves but I love him to death,” Cherie says. “He is my... (full context)
Adolescent Crime vs. Adult Crime Theme Icon
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Cherie also points out that Richard is shy around those he doesn’t know. He falls to “the background” becoming “just a... (full context)
Part 2: Oakland High School
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...with a cap and gown and a march across the stage.” By the end of Richard’s junior year, two-thirds of the outgoing senior class will graduate, “but life has a way... (full context)
Part 2: Miss Kaprice
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During the first month of Richard’s time at O High, Cherie gets into a fight and is sent home. She texts... (full context)
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...frequently works with the kids who get into trouble. “Can I get in your program?” Richard asks Kaprice. (full context)
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Later, Kapirce reads Richard’s transcript. Her program is geared more towards freshmen and sophomores (O High has 1,875 kids,... (full context)
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Kaprice later tells Richard that if he wants to be in her program, he must follow her rules. “I’m... (full context)
Part 2: The Best Mother Ever
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Kaprice’s office is “a safe zone for Richard,” and there she reminds him of his goals: “go to class, get your grades up,... (full context)
Part 2: Hopes and Prayers
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Jasmine, Richard’s mother, gave birth to Richard when she was just fourteen years old. Richard’s real father... (full context)
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Within two years, Jasmine gave birth to Derriyon, Richard’s younger brother, and suddenly their small family had six members. Jasmine was never able to... (full context)
Discrimination and Social Justice Theme Icon
...requirements needed to attend a California sate college or university.” It is more likely that Richard will be arrested. Young black boys account for only 30 percent of the underage population... (full context)
Part 2: Where He Left Off
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Richard begins to spend most of his free time in Kaprice’s office. His grades have started... (full context)
Adolescent Crime vs. Adult Crime Theme Icon
To everyone in his life, Richard is “the funny one, the one who makes people smile.” Jasmine begins to plan a... (full context)
Part 2: How It Was Before
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Cherie remembers back in 2012, when she and Richard were freshmen, they used to “cut school on the daily” and hang out with friends.... (full context)
Part 2: Fighting
Adolescent Crime vs. Adult Crime Theme Icon
One day back in 2012, Cherie and Richard skipped school with a group of friends, including their old friend, Skeet. They were headed... (full context)
Part 2: Arrested
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...them of stealing some of their stuff, including a cell phone. “Nothing was found on Richard and his friends,” Slater writes, “but charges were brought.” (full context)
Discrimination and Social Justice Theme Icon
Accountability, Redemption, and Forgiveness Theme Icon
...was sentenced to probation and made to wear a “GPS monitor on her ankle,” but Richard was sent to the group home in Redding three hours away. He stayed there for... (full context)
Part 2: Now It’s a Good Day
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...later “in an outbreak of violence that left four people dead in one six-hour period.” Richard heard about his friend’s death while he was in Redding. When Jasmine told him, Richard... (full context)
Part 2: If
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Skeet’s death “killed Richard,” Cherie says. Skeet started to hang out with some pretty bad kids after he ran... (full context)
Part 2: Working
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When Richard returned to Oakland after serving time in the Redding group home, it was the summer... (full context)
Part 2: Stripped
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Later that fall, Richard is held at gunpoint and robbed while walking to Cherie’s house. “In Oakland it’s called... (full context)
Part 2: Trust Issues
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This chapter is another of Slater’s poems in which she examines Richard’s life. The poem is one solid verse of several lines, and many of the lines... (full context)
Discrimination and Social Justice Theme Icon
...show.” Slater ends her poem with the following two lines: “’I don’t have any friends,’ Richard once said. / ‘I have associates.’” (full context)
Part 2: Resolve
Adolescent Crime vs. Adult Crime Theme Icon
After the robbery, Richard stays away from school for a few days. When he goes back, he visits Kaprice... (full context)
 Part 3: Monday, November 4, 2013
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A week after Richard is robbed, his cousin Lloyd—a “goofy and boisterous” kid two years older than Richard—stops by... (full context)
Part 3: 4:52 P.M.
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Binary Thought and Inclusive Language Theme Icon
At 4:52 P.M., the security camera on the 57 bus records Richard and Lloyd as they board. In the back, they find their friend Jamal, who is... (full context)
Gender and Sexuality Theme Icon
Adolescent Crime vs. Adult Crime Theme Icon
Discrimination and Social Justice Theme Icon
...“points it at Sasha as if planning to record.” It will be “funny,” Jamal and Richard figure, “like that prank show on MTV with Ashton Kutcher, Punk’d.” The skirt will smoke... (full context)
Adolescent Crime vs. Adult Crime Theme Icon
Accountability, Redemption, and Forgiveness Theme Icon
Sasha’s skirt fails to smoke or smolder. “Go ahead, you do it,” Jamal says to Richard. He flicks the lighter a second time, but there is still no smoke. “Do it,”... (full context)
Part 3: Watching
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Immediately after Richard jumps off the bus and sees Sasha in flames, he begins running after the moving... (full context)
Part 3: Locked Out
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The next morning at school, Kaprice gets a call from one of Richard’s teachers. Richard is requesting to talk to her, and she tells the teacher to send... (full context)
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...she accidentally locks her keys inside. As she walks around to another door, Kaprice sees Richard “being led away in handcuffs by two uniformed police officers.” (full context)
Part 3: I Knew My Baby
Adolescent Crime vs. Adult Crime Theme Icon
...her baby as soon as she sees him.” She calls Kaprice and immediately confirms that Richard has been arrested. Then she calls “everyone she can think of—Richard’s father, his probation officer,... (full context)
Part 3: The Interview, Part 1
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After Richard is arrested, the police put him in an interrogation room and leave him alone for... (full context)
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The officers tell Richard “they want to keep things relaxed,” and they start asking about his life. They ask... (full context)
Part 3: Miranda Warning
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“Why did you talk?” Jasmine asks Richard later. She tells him that he should have waited for a lawyer, but Richard didn’t... (full context)
Part 3: The Interview, Part 2
Gender and Sexuality Theme Icon
Discrimination and Social Justice Theme Icon
...do you think about dudes who dress up in skirts?” one of the officers asks Richard. “I’m not with that,” Richard says. “I wouldn’t say that I hate gay people, but... (full context)
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The police tell Richard that they have a video from the bus. “You’re not a bad kid,” one of... (full context)
Part 3: The Interview, Part 3
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The police show Richard “a short snippet of the video,” and then they ask him why he did it.... (full context)
Part 3: Surgery
Adolescent Crime vs. Adult Crime Theme Icon
...can’t concentrate to watch television. Although Sasha doesn’t know it, the police officer who interviewed Richard tells Debbie that Richard “actually said he’s homophobic” and that “he giggled.” (full context)
Part 3: Charges
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Within two days, Richard is charged as an adult with two felonies: “aggravated mayhem” and “assault with intent to... (full context)
Part 3: Court Date
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During Richard’s first court appearance, the press corners his family, asking them multiple questions. “What kind of... (full context)
Part 3: Reeling
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Jasmine feels as if “the world has spun off its axis.” She can’t believe that Richard has really done this. She’s angry with him, his friends, herself, and the whole world.... (full context)
Part 3: The Desk
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Nancy O’Malley, the Alameda County district attorney, has no problem charging Richard as an adult. She considers his crime “very, very, very serious,” and argues that hate... (full context)
Adolescent Crime vs. Adult Crime Theme Icon
...the Transgender Law Center. Both organizations ask her in a joint letter to reconsider charging Richard as an adult. “We firmly believe that you can demonstrate your offices’ commitment to protecting... (full context)
Part 3: The First Letter
Adolescent Crime vs. Adult Crime Theme Icon
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Slater includes a letter written by Richard to Sasha. “Dear, Victum,” the letter reads, “I apologize for my actions.” In the letter,... (full context)
Part 3: Into the Briefcase
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A few days after his arrest, Richard’s family “scrapes the money together” for a lawyer, and they hire Bill Du Bois, a... (full context)
Part 3: The Second Letter
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Two days later, Richard writes another letter to Sasha, but this one is much longer. “Dear Mr.—,” Richard begins,... (full context)
Part 3: Let’s All Take Care of Each Other
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Richard never writes another letter; however, Karl writes one to the parents and staff at the... (full context)
Part 3: Homophobic
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At Richard’s second court appearance, his cousin Regis arrives at the courthouse. Regis is gay and is... (full context)
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Richard’s court appearance is uneventful and Du Bois files an appeal to contest Richard’s being charged... (full context)
Part 3: No H8
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At Oakland High, nobody can believe that Richard has done such a thing. Still, they begin to distance themselves from him. “It is... (full context)
Part 3: Y’All Don’t Know
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Kaprice finds it difficult to go to school after Richard is arrested. No H8 banners fill the school, and the principal keeps reminding everyone to... (full context)
Part 3: The Circle
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As Richard’s friends continue to grow angry with each No H8 event that takes place at Oakland... (full context)
Part 3: God Is Good
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At Richard’s third court hearing, three women arrive wearing “turtlenecks and blazers and sensible shoes.” They are... (full context)
Part 3: Reunion
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...use a second time?” Slater writes. Dan asks Sasha what they want to happen to Richard now that he has been arrested and charged. “It’s really hard to know what I... (full context)
Part 4: Cruel and Unusual?
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As Richard enters the courtroom in mid-January, he is sure not to smile at Jasmine, so people... (full context)
Part 4: Back at Juvie
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At Juvenile Hall, Richard quickly falls into the routine—he has been here before, after all. He attends classes and... (full context)
Part 4: What If?
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...awful experience, but mostly she just thinks about “what ifs.” “What if” she had gotten Richard a better lawyer the last time he got in trouble? “What if” he was “tested... (full context)
Part 4: What to Say
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After Richard’s first evidentiary hearing in March, Jasmine “dashes over to speak” to Sasha and their family.... (full context)
Part 4: Always Okay
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...rather see it “from the person who did it.” The district attorney never speaks to Richard, however, and Richard’s letters stay in Du Bois’s briefcase. (full context)
Part 4: Ripples
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Darris Young, an organizer from an Oakland social justice advocacy group, watches as Richard’s case unfolds on television. He thinks that there might be a “different kind of solution,”... (full context)
Part 4: Restorative Justice
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Sujatha Baliga, “the nation’s foremost expert on restorative justice,” has been aware of Richard’s case from the beginning. She doesn’t, however, try to get in touch with Jasmine. “I’m... (full context)
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...an outcome that will be more healing for everyone involved.” Sujatha is not hopeful that Richard will be offered restorative justice “given the severity of the harm to Sasha,” and she... (full context)
Part 4: Not Wanting To
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...of not wanting to do that,” she says. Debbie doesn’t want anything to do with Richard’s punishment (she’s “wary about making any recommendations”), but she is convinced that she doesn’t want... (full context)
Part 4: The People vs. Richard
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Bill Du Bois thinks restorative justice “is a distraction.” He “loves their program,” but in Richard’s case the suggestion is “absurd.” They can all complete restorative justice, Du Bois says, but... (full context)
Part 4: Tired
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All summer long, Richard’s case makes little progress. Each court date only sets a new court date, and all... (full context)
Part 4: Bargaining
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In September, after Sasha leaves for college, the district attorney’s office makes Richard an offer. If Richard accepts five years for assault, they will drop the mayhem charge... (full context)
Part 4: The Deal
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In October, Nancy O’Malley, the district attorney, “abruptly withdraws” Richard’s five-year offer. “No! No! No!” Jasmine yells. “I’ve been nice! I’ve been polite!” The district... (full context)
Part 4: The Fine Print
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Richard can still have his sentence reduced to five years with good behavior. If his conduct... (full context)
Part 4: A Structured Environment
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Nancy O’Malley can’t say for sure why her office withdrew Richard’s original offer. “It keeps getting continued and continued and continued and the result is that... (full context)
Part 4: Look Where His People Went
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Some of Richard’s friends agree that maybe it is best that he does go to prison. So many... (full context)
Part 4: Victim-Impact Statement
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In November, Debbie addresses the court at Richard’s sentencing and gives a “victim impact statement.” Standing in front of Richard, Debbie says, “You... (full context)
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Debbie feels better after addressing Richard directly, but Karl can’t get over how young Richard looked. “Poor Jasmine,” Debbie says. “She... (full context)
Part 4: Nerd Fraternity
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Sasha doesn’t attend Richard’s sentencing. They are moving into the Epsilon Theta fraternity house on MIT’s campus. Epsilon Theta... (full context)
Part 4: How It Ended Up
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...from Oakland High. So many have gotten into trouble and have been sent away like Richard, and a few are even serving real time in state prison. Some are dead, like... (full context)
Part 4: Mail Delivery
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Sasha finally receives Richard’s letters in January 2015. Sasha, Karl, and Debbie all appreciate his apologies, but they wish... (full context)
Part 4: Chad
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On January 2, 2015 Richard is transferred to the N.A. Chaderjian Youth Correctional Facility in Stockton, California, otherwise “known as... (full context)
Part 4: Risky Thinking
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Inside Chad, Richard attends small meetings with other inmates and one of the parole agents. The meetings “teach... (full context)
Part 4: Progress Report
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...and Karl are there too. It is the last Friday in June 2015. Today is Richard’s second progress report, and if all goes well, his sentence will be reduced to five... (full context)
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Richard’s court file is misplaced, and the judge is forced to postpone the progress report until... (full context)
Part 4: A Level of Maturity
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The next week, the judge acknowledges Richard’s good behavior in court. He has done well at Chad, the judge says, and Richard... (full context)
Part 4: Birthdays
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Richard spends his eighteenth birthday in Chad. He eventually earns his high school diploma and takes... (full context)
Part 4: US Juvenile Incarceration
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Slater also includes some numbers applicable to Richard’s case. 54,148 juveniles are “held in correctional facilities on any given day,” she writes, and... (full context)