Noli Me Tangere

Noli Me Tangere

Don Filipo (Filipo Lino) Character Analysis

The deputy mayor of San Diego. Don Filipo is described as “almost liberal” and represents the informal party of the younger, more open-minded generation. Like his followers, he resents the idea that the town should spend great amounts of money on the yearly festival celebrating the various religious holidays in November. Unfortunately, Don Filipo works for the mayor, who essentially acts as the church’s political puppet. This makes Don Filipo largely unable to bring about actual change, meaning that the town’s power structures remain closely tied to the church.

Don Filipo (Filipo Lino) Quotes in Noli Me Tangere

The Noli Me Tangere quotes below are all either spoken by Don Filipo (Filipo Lino) or refer to Don Filipo (Filipo Lino). For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the Penguin Books edition of Noli Me Tangere published in 2006.
Chapter 14 Quotes

Pure, simple faith is as different from fanaticism as flames from smoke, as music from cacophony. Imbeciles, like deaf people, confuse the two. Between you and me, we can admit that the idea of purgatory is a good one, holy and rational. It maintains the connection between those who were and those who are, and obliges one to lead a purer form of life. The bad part is when people abuse it.

Related Characters: Old Tasio (Don Anastasio) (speaker), Don Filipo (Filipo Lino)
Page Number: 84
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation long mobile

Unlock explanations and citation info for this and every other Noli Me Tangere quote.

Plus so much more...

Get LitCharts A+
Already a LitCharts A+ member? Sign in!
Chapter 35 Quotes

“But, gentlemen,” the mayor interrupted. “What can we do? What can the town do? Whatever happens, the friars are always right!”

“They are always right because we always let them be right,” Don Filipo answered with impatience, emphasizing the word “always.” “Let us be in the right for a change and then let’s talk!”

The mayor scratched his head and, looking at the ceiling, replied sourly, “Ay, the heat of blood! It seems like we don’t even know what country we’re in; we don’t even know our own countrymen. The friars are rich and united, and we are divided and poor. Sure, try to defend him and you’ll see how everyone will abandon you to your task.”

“Sure,” Don Filipo exclaimed bitterly, “it will always happen if you think that way, while fear and restraint are synonymous. Everyone pays more attention to something bad rather than to a needed good thing. Suddenly it’s all fear and lack of trust. Everyone thinks about himself, and no one about other people. That’s why we’re so weak!”

Page Number: 233
Explanation and Analysis:
Quotes explanation short mobile
Get the entire Noli Me Tangere LitChart as a printable PDF.
Noli me tangere.pdf.medium

Don Filipo (Filipo Lino) Character Timeline in Noli Me Tangere

The timeline below shows where the character Don Filipo (Filipo Lino) appears in Noli Me Tangere. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Chapter 14: Tasio, Madman or Philosopher
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
...Tasio walks the streets, a voice calls from a window and invites him inside. It’s Don Filipo , the deputy mayor and “almost liberal” party chief. Inside, Tasio, Filipo, and Filipo’s wife... (full context)
Chapter 19: Adventures of a Schoolmaster
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
Revolution and Reform Theme Icon
Education Theme Icon
...Having heard this story, Ibarra says, “Don’t be so pessimistic.” He tells the schoolmaster that Don Filipo —the liberally-inclined deputy mayor—has invited him to a meeting at the city hall. “Who knows... (full context)
Chapter 20: The Meeting at City Hall
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
...represent San Diego’s liberal component—these two sides are notorious for never seeing eye to eye. Don Filipo , the deputy mayor, complains to his friends about the mayor, who’s older and more... (full context)
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
...Rafael’s—rises and delivers a long-winded introduction that opens the floor to discussions regarding the fiesta. Don Filipo then takes the floor and says that the town’s youth wish to spend the majority... (full context)
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
Although Don Filipo successfully tricked the conservative old men into approving a reasonable budget for the fiesta, the... (full context)
Revolution and Reform Theme Icon
...asks the schoolmaster. “We have some business there!” Ibarra says without explanation. Meanwhile, Tasio and Don Filipo make their way home together. On their way, Tasio bemoans the fact that the mayor—Don... (full context)
Chapter 24: In The Forest
Revolution and Reform Theme Icon
...that the majority of the town is there, including his nemesis the ensign, the mayor, Don Filipo , and even Captain Basilio, who was Don Rafael’s enemy in a past lawsuit that... (full context)
Chapter 29: Morning
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
On the last day of San Diego’s festival, Don Filipo and Old Tasio discuss how absurd it is that the town has spent so much... (full context)
Chapter 35: Comments
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
Isolation Theme Icon
...they can protect Ibarra, given all he and his father have done for San Diego. Don Filipo in particular hopes to do what he can to shield Ibarra from public harm, but... (full context)
Chapter 40: Right and Might
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
At the theater that night, Don Filipo tells Tasio that the mayor hasn’t accepted his resignation, instead suggesting that they postpone discussing... (full context)
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
Revolution and Reform Theme Icon
...Guards have attacked the musicians in the orchestra in order to stop the event. As Don Filipo and his men quell the soldiers, the crowd curses the Civil Guard, proposing to burn... (full context)
Chapter 53: Il Buon Dí Si Conosce Da Mattina
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
Revolution and Reform Theme Icon
...morning, while the town whispers about having seen shadows in the cemetery the night before, Don Filipo speaks with Tasio, who has fallen gravely ill. Tasio criticizes him for having tendered his... (full context)
Chapter 56: What is Said and What is Believed
Colonialism, Religion, and Power Theme Icon
Revolution and Reform Theme Icon
Gossip and rumors fly throughout San Diego. Eventually the townspeople learn that Don Filipo and Ibarra have been imprisoned. Bruno—one of the brothers whom Lucas convinced to sack the... (full context)
Chapter 63: Christmas Eve
Isolation Theme Icon
...limps his way through the woods and into San Diego, where Captain Basilio speaks with Don Filipo in the street, telling him he’s lucky to have been let go unharmed by the... (full context)