Middlemarch

Middlemarch

by

George Eliot

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Dorothea Brooke Character Analysis

Although in some ways Middlemarch does not center around a single character, Dorothea is the closest the novel gets to a protagonist. Uniquely strong-willed, passionate, and rebellious, Dorothea is a deeply religious woman “enamored of intensity and greatness.” She is also committed to social reform and channels her energies into designing cottages for the tenant farmers on her uncle Mr. Brooke’s estate and, later, planning a “colony” for workers. Ultimately these plans do not transpire, in part due to Dorothea’s naivety, and in part due to the significant restrictions placed on women in the society in which she lives. Dorothea is painfully aware of the ways that she doesn’t conform to the ideal of femininity, and she tries to reconcile her grand ambitions with her desire to better meet this ideal through her marriage at 18 to the 45-year-old Rev. Edward Casaubon. Dorothea’s bitter disappointment in the marriage and in Casaubon as a husband leave her feeling tormented and confused, though her fiery spirit is never fully crushed. When she is 21 Casaubon dies, leaving all his property to her with the stipulation that it will be taken away if she marries his cousin Will Ladislaw, of whom Casaubon was intensely jealous. Dorothea and Will are far more suited to each other due to their shared earnest, passionate, and convention-flouting personalities. However, it takes them a while to admit that they are in love with one another, partly due to the dilemma caused by Casaubon’s will. Although Dorothea eventually ends up happily married to Will and the mother of his children, the narrator comments that it is a shame that for all her ambition, Dorothea was not able to lead a “greater” life and leave a more impactful legacy.

Dorothea Brooke Quotes in Middlemarch

The Middlemarch quotes below are all either spoken by Dorothea Brooke or refer to Dorothea Brooke. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
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). Note: all page numbers and citation info for the quotes below refer to the HarperCollins edition of Middlemarch published in 2015.
Book 1, Chapter 4 Quotes

“It is very hard: it is your favourite fad to draw plans.”

“Fad to draw plans! Do you think I only care about my fellow creatures’ houses in that childish way? I may well make mistakes. How can one ever do anything nobly Christian, living among people with such petty thoughts?”

Related Characters: Dorothea Brooke (speaker), Celia Brooke (speaker)
Related Symbols: Cottages
Page Number: 37
Explanation and Analysis:
Book 4, Chapter 42 Quotes

Thus his intellectual ambition which seemed to others to have absorbed and dried him, was really no security against wounds, least of all against those which came from Dorothea. And he had begun now to frame possibilities for the future which were somehow more embittering to him than anything his mind had dwelt on before.

Related Characters: Dorothea Brooke, Rev. Edward Casaubon
Related Symbols: The Key to All Mythologies
Page Number: 418
Explanation and Analysis:
Book 5, Chapter 48 Quotes

And here Dorothea's pity turned from her own future to her husband's past - nay, to his present hard struggle with a lot which had grown out of that past the lonely labour, the ambition breathing hardly under the pressure of self-distrust; the goal receding, and the heavier limbs; and now at last the sword visibly trembling above him! And had she not wished to marry him that she might help him in his life's labour? - But she had thought the work was to be something greater, which she could serve in devoutly for its own sake. Was it right, even to soothe his grief - would it be possible, even if she promised - to work as in a treadmill fruitlessly?

Related Characters: Dorothea Brooke, Rev. Edward Casaubon
Related Symbols: The Key to All Mythologies
Page Number: 479
Explanation and Analysis:
Book 6, Chapter 54 Quotes

“I never felt it a misfortune to have nothing till now,” he said. “But poverty may be as bad as leprosy, if it divides us from what we most care for.”

Related Characters: Will Ladislaw (speaker), Dorothea Brooke
Page Number: 544
Explanation and Analysis:
Book 8, Chapter 72 Quotes

“And, of course men know best about everything, except what women know better.”

Dorothea laughed and forgot her tears.

“Well, I mean about babies and those things,” explained Celia. “I should not give up to James when I knew he was wrong, as you used to do to Mr Casaubon.”

Related Characters: Dorothea Brooke (speaker), Celia Brooke (speaker), Sir James Chettam, Rev. Edward Casaubon
Page Number: 736
Explanation and Analysis:
Finale Quotes

Many who knew her, thought it a pity that so substantive and rare a creature should have been absorbed into the life of another, and be only known in a certain circle as a wife and mother. But no one stated exactly what else that was in her power she ought rather to have done - not even Sir James Chettam, who went no further than the negative prescription that she ought not to have married Will Ladislaw.

Page Number: 836
Explanation and Analysis:
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Dorothea Brooke Character Timeline in Middlemarch

The timeline below shows where the character Dorothea Brooke appears in Middlemarch. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book 1, Chapter 1
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Dorothea Brooke tends to wear simple, modest clothes, which make her look even more beautiful. People... (full context)
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If Dorothea marries and has a son, her son will inherit Mr. Brooke’s substantial estate. As such... (full context)
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...to the Brookes’ house, Tipton Grange, it is assumed he is in love with Celia. Dorothea has a “childlike” understanding of marriage and thinks her ideal husband would be like a... (full context)
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After Dorothea comes home from the school she has set up in Middlemarch, Celia asks if they... (full context)
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Upset, Celia says that she is embarrassed to wear the jewelry if Dorothea refuses to do so. However, Dorothea then begins to admire the ornaments, trying to justify... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 2
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Sir James says he knows Dorothea likes horse-riding and that he would love to lend her an elegant horse he owns... (full context)
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Mr. Brooke returns to discussing politics, and Dorothea says that she wishes he would let her organize his documents. Casaubon admiringly comments that... (full context)
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Celia thinks it’s a shame that Dorothea doesn’t like Sir James, and fears that her sister won’t marry any man unless he... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 3
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The next morning Dorothea and Casaubon have a long conversation, during which she gets to know his “labyrinthine” mind... (full context)
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Afterward, Casaubon looks at Mr. Brooke’s documents in his office. Before going, he tells Dorothea he has been feeling lonely. He then leaves for his home, Lowick Manor, which is... (full context)
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Dorothea imagines that if she marries Casaubon she will “learn everything.” She dreams about helping him... (full context)
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Dorothea adds that she thinks Celia would like the puppy, but Sir James only responds by... (full context)
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...comes to Tipton again. It is increasingly clear that he is deliberately coming to see Dorothea, who is thrilled to spend time with him. During their conversations, the only thing that... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 4
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Celia comments that Sir James is eager to do everything Dorothea wants, and Dorothea replies: “He thinks of me as a future sister.” Celia blushes and... (full context)
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Dorothea insists that she must abandon the cottages and be rude to Sir James from now... (full context)
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Mr. Brooke finds Dorothea entranced by her reading; he tells her that he’s noticed Casaubon wants a wife. When... (full context)
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...confused, feeling that he doesn’t understand women. At 45, Casaubon is 27 years older than Dorothea, and Casaubon’s health is poor. Dorothea says she’d prefer a husband who is older so... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 5
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The chapter opens with Casaubon’s letter to Dorothea. It is comically stiff and convoluted, devoid of any romance or affection whatsoever. He tells... (full context)
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Reading the letter, Dorothea bursts into tears and drops to the floor. She is overwhelmed with happiness that the... (full context)
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Mr. Brooke checks that Dorothea is certain she doesn’t want to marry Sir James instead. He tells her that he... (full context)
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...coming to dinner so she doesn’t have to listen to Casaubon eat his soup. Hurt, Dorothea tells Celia not to say things like that; when Celia continues, Dorothea angrily tells her... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 6
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...he doesn’t debate politics with women, because “your sex are not thinkers.” Mrs. Cadwallader mentions Dorothea and Sir James; Mr. Brooke regretfully replies that the marriage will never take place. Just... (full context)
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...his denial. She then warns him to brace himself for bad news, before telling him Dorothea is engaged to Casaubon. (full context)
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...but despises “the vulgar rich.” For years, Mrs. Cadwallader has been keeping an eye on Dorothea and Celia and chastising Mr. Brooke when necessary. She had been planning Dorothea’s engagement to... (full context)
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Sir James himself does not dwell on his sadness about losing Dorothea for long, and in fact actually feels grateful that he didn’t propose because this way... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 7
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All the time that Casaubon spends at Tipton during his and Dorothea’s engagement forces him to neglect his scholarly project, The Key to All Mythologies. Dorothea suggests... (full context)
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...Brooke tells Casaubon that certain subjects are too difficult for women, but Casaubon replies that Dorothea is only learning the Greek alphabet. Brooke says that women do better at dabbling in... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 8
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...enjoys coming to Tipton; he does not feel resentful of Casaubon, but rather worries that Dorothea is gripped by some kind of “melancholy illusion.” Although he tells himself that he accepts... (full context)
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...with his poor relatives, but Sir James is unconvinced. He thinks that Casaubon won’t make Dorothea happy and that the marriage should be postponed until she is “of age.” Mrs. Cadwallader... (full context)
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...study have spoiled Casaubon’s personality. Mr. Cadwallader says that while he can’t pretend to understand Dorothea’s choices they should still be respected, and that Casaubon is as good as any person.... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 9
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...dictates before marriage in order that she may have an appetite for submission afterwards.” Thus Dorothea, Celia, and Mr. Brooke make a trip to Casaubon’s home, Lowick Manor. It is a... (full context)
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Dorothea, however, is enchanted by Lowick’s quiet darkness, and is filled with joy as she walks... (full context)
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...“made an unfortunate marriage” and that he barely knew her. In the garden, Casaubon tells Dorothea that she will like the nearby village, as the houses there are like the cottages... (full context)
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...is an artist, but Will replies that there is nothing worth seeing in its pages. Dorothea says that she has never been able to understand art. Will thinks that Dorothea must... (full context)
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...but it has not worked. He says he will support Will for a year, and Dorothea says that this is kind of him, adding that people should be patient with one... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 10
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Dorothea, on the other hand, is filled with excitement and optimism about her marriage. The couple... (full context)
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That night, a large dinner party is held at Tipton Grange before the wedding. Dorothea looks modest but serenely beautiful. Guests at the dinner include a banker (Bulstrode) who is... (full context)
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...for the occasion.” Lady Chettam notes that James still refuses to say anything bad about Dorothea. The women then observe that Dorothea is having a lively conversation with Tertius Lydgate about... (full context)
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...being subject to experimental treatments. Lydgate himself, who cannot hear this conversation, is fascinated by Dorothea, whom he thinks is both a “fine girl” and “a little too earnest.” Shortly after... (full context)
Book 1, Chapter 11
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...way to go before he becomes an attractive match. He imagines that marrying someone like Dorothea would be hard work, whereas being married to Rosamond would be a heavenly respite from... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 19
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...the most perfect young Madonna I ever saw.” Ladislaw explains that he has only met Dorothea once and didn’t know she and Casaubon would be in Rome. (full context)
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...painter named Adolf Naumann. To Will’s dismay, he is determined to paint a picture of Dorothea. Naumann keeps referring to Dorothea as Will’s aunt, which greatly annoys him. Naumann says that... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 20
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Two hours later, Dorothea sits in her apartment and weeps while Casaubon remains at the Vatican working. Dorothea is... (full context)
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Dorothea is confused. Casaubon hasn’t changed; he is just as serious and intelligent as he always... (full context)
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...they go to see in Rome. Now, at the end of their journey, he tells Dorothea that he thinks that the trip will set her up for a life “as a... (full context)
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A brief argument ensues, and both Dorothea and Casaubon are shocked by the anger expressed by the other. Earlier, she had accompanied... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 21
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Back in the moment when Dorothea is crying alone in the apartment, Casaubon’s servant Tantripp knocks on the door with the... (full context)
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Will smiles a charming smile, and Dorothea asks if something amuses him. He replies that he is thinking of when they met... (full context)
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...a shame that his scholarship is hindered by the fact that he can’t read German. Dorothea is distressed at the thought that Casaubon’s work might actually be pointless. Seeing that he... (full context)
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Casaubon arrives and invites Will to dinner the next day; Will agrees and leaves. Dorothea apologizes to her husband for her angry words that morning and begins to cry again.... (full context)
Book 2, Chapter 22
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At dinner the next day, Dorothea is impressed by the charming way Will converses with Casaubon. Casaubon similarly feels proud of... (full context)
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...of St. Thomas Aquinas, and Casaubon is surprised and thrilled—though not half as thrilled as Dorothea, who feels that this confirms that Casaubon is indeed the great man she imagined. Naumann... (full context)
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Will desperately tries to see Dorothea alone before she leaves Rome. He visits her in the middle of the day, when... (full context)
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Will is worried that he might have insulted her, but his kind tone ensures that Dorothea is not offended. Dorothea asks him if Casaubon’s ignorance of German really dooms his scholarship... (full context)
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Will goes to leave, saying he thinks Dorothea doesn’t like him. Dorothea insists: “I like you very much.” She says she looks forward... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 28
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Dorothea and Casaubon arrive back from their honeymoon to January snow. The morning after their arrival... (full context)
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Dorothea runs into Celia and Mr. Brooke, who greet her enthusiastically. Dorothea and Celia go to... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 29
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This chapter begins with another consideration of Dorothea’s perspective before switching to Casaubon’s. The narrator argues that Casaubon cannot be blamed for choosing... (full context)
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Casaubon had planned to rely on Dorothea’s help with his work, but now this strikes him as not worth the effort. Nonetheless... (full context)
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Dorothea helps Casaubon to the couch. Sir James arrives and Dorothea explains that her husband has... (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 30
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...so hard. Casaubon protests that this will be miserable, and Lydgate commiserates. Lydgate speaks with Dorothea, assuring her that Casaubon’s health is improving. He tells her that it is possible that... (full context)
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Lydgate feels he cannot answer, and so he leaves. Dorothea sobs and returns to Casaubon’s study, where she finds the letters from Will, which she... (full context)
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...as Brooke is interested in discussing politics with him. He sends the letter without telling Dorothea, who is busy tending to Casaubon. (full context)
Book 3, Chapter 31
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That evening Lydgate speaks with Rosamond, expressing surprise and confusion about Dorothea’s marriage. Lydgate and Rosamond’s flirtation cannot be kept secret in Middlemarch, which is rife with... (full context)
Book 4, Chapter 34
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Casaubon, Dorothea, and their guests watch through the window as the funeral train enters the church. Celia... (full context)
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...was coming. Mr. Brooke casually explains that Ladislaw is staying with him. Casaubon concludes that Dorothea must have asked Mr. Brooke to invite Ladislaw to stay at Tipton. Dorothea knows Casaubon... (full context)
Book 4, Chapter 37
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Ladislaw is determined to faithfully watch over Dorothea and has managed to see her a few times since coming to Middlemarch, although never... (full context)
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Will says that Casaubon should get a secretary, and Dorothea says neither she nor her husband wants that. Will then says that this is because... (full context)
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Dorothea says that she has always had “too much of everything.” Will explains that his mother... (full context)
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When Casaubon comes home, Dorothea tells him about Will’s visit and Mr. Brooke’s proposal. She suggests that it would be... (full context)
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Meanwhile, Dorothea keeps thinking about Julia. She thinks that the unjust way Julia was treated means that... (full context)
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Dorothea then mentions Julia, suggesting that Casaubon himself perhaps felt a debt and that’s why he... (full context)
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...convinced that all of Will’s recent actions have been part of a plan to turn Dorothea against him. He considers contacting Mr. Brooke or Sir James for help. However, he doesn’t... (full context)
Book 4, Chapter 39
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One day Dorothea comes to see Mr. Brooke and Will while they are at work together on the... (full context)
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Mr. Brooke admits that Dorothea may have a point, although not without mentioning the limits of women’s intelligence. He is... (full context)
Book 4, Chapter 42
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...admit that he has failed. He is tormented by Ladislaw’s presence in Middlemarch and by Dorothea’s lively, insistent personality. He suspects that Dorothea is judgmental of him, which is especially upsetting... (full context)
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...death would bring joy to Ladislaw, and is convinced that Ladislaw will try to marry Dorothea once she is widowed. He believes that such a union would be “fatal” to Dorothea... (full context)
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...years. Lydgate goes, and Casaubon is left confronting the inescapable reality of his own death. Dorothea goes to join her husband outside, but Casaubon reacts coldly, so she leaves him alone.... (full context)
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For the first time, Dorothea blames Casaubon, rather than herself, for the problems in their marriage. By nightfall, she decides... (full context)
Book 5, Chapter 43
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Despite the fact that she rarely leaves Lowick Manor without Casaubon, Dorothea goes into town to ask Lydgate for the truth about her husband’s health. Arriving at... (full context)
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When Lydgate comes home that evening, Rosamond tells him that Will is totally enraptured by Dorothea. Rosamond has been surprised to discover that married women can still cast this kind of... (full context)
Book 5, Chapter 44
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Dorothea says she is glad Lydgate has told her about this, and promises to give £200... (full context)
Book 5, Chapter 46
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...about Brooke’s appreciation of his rhetorical skill. At the same time, if it weren’t for Dorothea he would certainly still be in Italy, engaged in creative pursuits. (full context)
Book 5, Chapter 47
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...himself” through his work with Brooke. Surprisingly, he does not spend time dreaming of becoming Dorothea’s husband in the event of Casaubon’s death. Due to his romantic nature, the feelings he... (full context)
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Will heads to church, humming a tune he has made up himself. When Dorothea enters the church she does not acknowledge him, and Will suddenly feels awkward. He does... (full context)
Book 5, Chapter 48
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Dorothea is miserable over the fact that Casaubon refused to acknowledge Will. Her life feels empty,... (full context)
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Before he goes to sleep, Casaubon asks Dorothea if she will promise to act according to his wishes after he dies. She is... (full context)
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At the same time, Dorothea cannot bear the cruelty of denying his request. Tormented, she is not able to fall... (full context)
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Eventually Dorothea reluctantly goes out to meet Casaubon in the garden. She finds him sitting at a... (full context)
Book 5, Chapter 49
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The day after Casaubon’s funeral, Dorothea remains shut up in her room. Sir James tells Mr. Brooke that until Dorothea is... (full context)
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...Ladislaw. Brooke suggests that sending Ladislaw away might imply that they were actually suspicious of Dorothea. Sir James laments that they failed to stop it when “Dorothea was sacrificed once,” and... (full context)
Book 5, Chapter 50
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After staying at Freshitt for week, Dorothea starts asking “dangerous questions.” She speaks to Mr. Brooke about who will take over as... (full context)
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Celia eventually admits that Casaubon has done something terrible and that she must warn Dorothea about it. She reveals that Casaubon stipulated that all the property Dorothea will inherit from... (full context)
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Lydgate enters and checks Dorothea’s pulse. While speaking with him, Dorothea starts violently sobbing. Lydgate is convinced that Dorothea has... (full context)
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At Lowick, Dorothea finds Casaubon’s instructions for her to finish The Key to All Mythologies, which she now... (full context)
Book 5, Chapter 51
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...to Tipton, which angers him. He thinks: “I might as well be at Rome; she [Dorothea] would be no farther from me.” Brooke remains hesitant about the Reform Bill, but Will... (full context)
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...to him, and he  resolves to leave Middlemarch. However, he won’t go until he and Dorothea exchange “some kind of sign.” Facing pressure to abandon his run for election, Brooke decides... (full context)
Book 6, Chapter 54
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Dorothea has been at Freshitt three months and is growing bored by spending all her time... (full context)
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...her husband that Mr. Brooke is being irresponsible by neglecting to bring suitors to see Dorothea. Dorothea, meanwhile, has been hoping to see Will, but apart from that brief moment in... (full context)
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When Dorothea enters, Will tells her he is leaving Middlemarch. He plans to carry on his political... (full context)
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Sir James enters; Will says goodbye to Dorothea and leaves. Dorothea acts casual, while Sir James remains horrified about the idea of Will... (full context)
Book 6, Chapter 55
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...point in life when disappointments are felt most strongly, because they are new experiences. Although Dorothea feels miserable after Will’s departure, she does not yet realize that she is in love... (full context)
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Dorothea says that Mrs. Cadwallader is free to have fun speculating, but that she has no... (full context)
Book 6, Chapter 56
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Caleb Garth is impressed by Dorothea’s grasp of “business.” Caleb has been very busy, and is now occupied with plans for... (full context)
Book 6, Chapter 58
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...with Rosamond. It has been a few weeks since Will went to Lowick to bid Dorothea goodbye, but for now he is still working in Middlemarch. Dismissing Rosamond’s protests, Will leaves. (full context)
Book 6, Chapter 59
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Fred hears from Farebrother’s female relatives about the stipulation in Casaubon’s will forbidding Dorothea from marrying Will. Fred has not spoken much to Rosamond since she got married; she... (full context)
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The next time she sees Will, however, Rosamond brings up Dorothea, declaring the whole situation “thoroughly romantic.” Will goes bright red and asks what she is... (full context)
Book 6, Chapter 61
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...refuse the money so quickly was the knowledge that he could never face admitting to Dorothea that he acquired money in this way. Bulstrode, meanwhile, bursts into tears. (full context)
Book 6, Chapter 62
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Will is determined to see Dorothea one more time and then leave Middlemarch, even though he is somewhat embarrassed to say... (full context)
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Mrs. Cadwallader tells Dorothea that Will is in Middlemarch and that he is constantly “warbling” with Rosamond. Upset, Dorothea... (full context)
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Dorothea and Will can hardly bring themselves to speak to each other. Will admits: “What I... (full context)
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Despite everything, Dorothea feels happy that she is free to dream about Will, who she finally knows for... (full context)
Book 7, Chapter 63
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...approaches Lydgate and says he heard from Mr. Brooke that Lydgate was responsible for persuading Dorothea to give Farebrother the position at Lowick. Lydgate calls Mr. Brooke “a leaky-minded old fool.”... (full context)
Book 7, Chapter 67
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...Lydgate to believe that Bulstrode must have lost a lot of money. Bulstrode says that Dorothea would be the only person who might reasonably be expected to finance the hospital in... (full context)
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Lydgate suggests that he can go and talk to Dorothea and Bulstrode agrees, although he adds that at the moment she is in Yorkshire with... (full context)
Book 7, Chapter 71
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...gave him was a bribe. After the meeting, Mr. Brooke and Farebrother go to see Dorothea and tell her the shocking news about Lydgate and the New Hospital. Dorothea says she... (full context)
Book 8, Chapter 72
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Farebrother tells Dorothea not to approach Lydgate herself, as this will insult his pride. Dorothea remains desperate to... (full context)
Book 8, Chapter 76
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Dorothea invites Lydgate to Lowick Manor. She has become very excited about the idea of helping... (full context)
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...hard on Bulstrode,” because despite everything he is still grateful to him for the £1000. Dorothea promises that she won’t repeat his words to anyone, although she says that if she... (full context)
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...Either way, Lydgate is condemned by association—“the business is done and can’t be undone.” Moved, Dorothea says she can’t bear the idea of Lydgate’s ambitions coming to this end.  (full context)
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Dorothea suggests that Lydgate stay and keep up his work at the New Hospital while waiting... (full context)
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Dorothea asks if she can go and try to persuade Rosamond to stay. Lydgate agrees that... (full context)
Book 8, Chapter 77
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...Will is “the grandson of a thieving Jew pawnbroker.” Though confident that Will loves her, Dorothea believes that it is impossible that they will ever get married. (full context)
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Dorothea arrives at the Lydgates’ and, believing that Rosamond is not in, her servant shows Dorothea... (full context)
Book 8, Chapter 78
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After Dorothea leaves the drawing room, Will and Rosamond stand very still; Rosamond puts her hand on... (full context)
Book 8, Chapter 79
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After tending to Rosamond, Lydgate reads Dorothea’s letter. Will arrives and Lydgate tells him that Rosamond has had a “nervous shock” and... (full context)
Book 8, Chapter 80
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Dorothea sees Farebrother in the morning and promises to have dinner with him that evening. She... (full context)
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Dorothea wakes up in the early hours of the morning with a sudden sense of clarity.... (full context)
Book 8, Chapter 81
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Dorothea arrives and asks Lydgate, who clearly has no idea what happened the day before, if... (full context)
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Dorothea tells Rosamond that Mr. Farebrother, Mr. Brooke, and Sir James all know and believe the... (full context)
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Composing herself, Rosamond explains that Dorothea misinterpreted the scene between her and Will yesterday. She says that Will was confessing that... (full context)
Book 8, Chapter 82
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On returning to Middlemarch, Will had hoped that he would encounter Dorothea somehow. However, he also came back because he was considering taking the money Bulstrode offered... (full context)
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Following the incident with Dorothea, Will returns to the Lydgates’ and pretends that he and Rosamond have not yet seen... (full context)
Book 8, Chapter 83
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Dorothea has been occupying herself by attending to the needs of the local people in Lowick,... (full context)
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Dorothea thinks about Casaubon’s will, and somewhat hesitantly tells Miss Noble that Will should come in.... (full context)
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Will admits that he is hopeless, because even if Dorothea loves him he will always be poor and they therefore cannot be together. For this... (full context)
Book 8, Chapter 84
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...has “sad news,” which he will tell everyone if they go inside. He announces that Dorothea and Will are engaged. James dramatically declares that he should have shot Will years ago,... (full context)
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Mr. Brooke says he tried to reason with Dorothea, but there was no use as she doesn’t want her fortune anyway. Sir James insists... (full context)
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Mr. Brooke says the wedding is in three weeks. Mr. Cadwallader comments that if Dorothea wants to be poor then her choice must be respected. Mrs. Cadwallader mentions Will’s low... (full context)
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Celia sees Dorothea alone in her boudoir. She tells Dorothea that she has deeply disappointed everyone, especially James.... (full context)
Finale
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...of her and Lydgate’s four children. She calls this second marriage her “reward.” As for Dorothea, she never regrets giving up her fortune to marry Will, who becomes a prominent political... (full context)
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One day Celia receives a letter saying that, after a dangerous pregnancy, Dorothea has given birth to a son. She is upset that Sir James won’t let her... (full context)