The Faerie Queene

The Faerie Queene

by

Edmund Spenser

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Arthegall Character Analysis

Arthegall is a brave knight who is first introduced as the lady knight Britomart’s future husband in Book III and who later goes on his own journey as the protagonist of Book V (in order to free Eirena from the clutches of Grantorto), where he represents the virtue of justice. Though Arthegall is bested by Britomart when they meet and fight due to a case of mistaken identity, he is a strong knight whose ideas about justice are strict and uncompromising. He rides with a metal man at his command named Talus who sometimes fights on his behalf, and he wields a powerful sword known as Chrysaor. Although Arthegall is ultimately a heroic character, he does occasionally go too far and has to be held back from slaying too many people. This demonstrates how justice can be tricky to carry out, even for a great knight like Arthegall.

Arthegall Quotes in The Faerie Queene

The The Faerie Queene quotes below are all either spoken by Arthegall or refer to Arthegall. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one:
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
).
Book III: Canto III Quotes

The man whom Heavens have ordaynd to bee
The spouse of Britomart, is Arthegall:
He wonneth in the land of Fayeree

Related Characters: Merlin (speaker), Britomart, Arthegall, Glauce
Page Number: 422
Explanation and Analysis:
Book V: Canto I Quotes

And such was he, of whome I have to tell,
The Champion of true Justice Artegall.
Whom (as ye lately mote remember well)
An hard adventure, which did then befall,
Into redoubted perill forth did call.

Related Characters: Narrator (speaker), Gloriana (The Faerie Queene), Arthegall, Britomart
Page Number: 727
Explanation and Analysis:
Book V: Canto IV Quotes

For eqaull right in equall things doth stand,
For what the mighty Sea hath once possest,
And plucked quite from all possessors hand,
Whether by rage of waves, that never rest,
Or else by wracke, that wretches hath distrest,
He may dispose by his imperial might.

Related Characters: Arthegall (speaker), Bracidas, Amidas, Lucy, Philtera
Page Number: 764
Explanation and Analysis:
Book V: Canto VII Quotes

Where being layd, the wrothfull Britonesse
Stayd not, till she came to her selfe againe,
But in revenge both of her loves distresse,
And her late vile reproach, though vaunted vaine,
And also of her wound, which sore did paine,
She with one stroke both head and helmet cleft.

Related Characters: Radigund, Britomart, Arthegall
Page Number: 807
Explanation and Analysis:
Book V: Canto X Quotes

When they had seene and heard her doome a rights
Against Duessa, damned by them all;
But by her tempred without griefe or gall,
Till strong constraint did her thereto enforce.

Related Characters: Duessa, Mercilla, Arthegall
Page Number: 838
Explanation and Analysis:
Book V: Canto XII Quotes

But ere he could reform it thoroughly,
He through occasion called was away,
To Faerie Court, that of necessity
His course of Justice he was forst to stay,
And Talus to revoke from the right way

Related Characters: Arthegall, Talus, Eirena, Grantorto
Related Symbols: Faerie Court
Page Number: 870
Explanation and Analysis:
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Arthegall Character Timeline in The Faerie Queene

The timeline below shows where the character Arthegall appears in The Faerie Queene. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book III: Canto II
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...all the way from Britain seeking adventure, but most especially seeking out a man named Arthegall, who treated her dishonorably. (full context)
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...this, the Redcross Knight joins the conversation, saying he is surprised: he has heard of Arthegall, but he knows him as one of the noblest knights ever born. In fact, however,... (full context)
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Without revealing her true feelings, Britomart says she wants to see Arthegall. Redcross describes his appearance, which matches up with what Britomart herself saw back in Britain,... (full context)
Book III: Canto III
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...him, and soon destiny will bring her to find her love, an exceptional knight named Arthegall, who is from faerie land but not a faerie himself (having been stolen by faeries... (full context)
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Merlin goes on to tell Arthegall’s future and how he will wage glorious war against the pagans and give birth to... (full context)
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Merlin continues his story of Arthegall’s descendants, telling of the next 800 years. At last, Merlin has exhausted his power, and... (full context)
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...present state, in which she runs into the Redcross Knight and he tells her about Arthegall. (full context)
Book III: Canto IV
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...even the heroes of old from Homer’s time can’t compare with Britomart. After learning of Arthegall’s whereabouts from the Redcross Knight, Britomart parts from him and continues on her journey. Despite... (full context)
Book IV: Canto IV
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...that he immediately strikes down nine other knights. It turns out this new knight is Arthegall (the knight Britomart saw in her vision and fell in love with).  (full context)
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Arthegall easily subdues Sir Satyrane and his knights and seems likely to claim victory, but just... (full context)
Book IV: Canto V
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...day, Triamond won the second, and Britomart won the third, as well as winning overall. Arthegall is unhappy about this outcome and vows vengeance one day. (full context)
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...beautiful and awarded to Britomart. But since Britomart doesn’t want her, she is awarded to Arthegall, who has apparently already left in anger. She’s then passed to Triamond, who stays loyal... (full context)
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...him. Britomart continues on her own adventure seeking her love but not realizing that it’s Arthegall and that she’s already made him an enemy. Though Britomart is glad to have a... (full context)
Book IV: Canto VI
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...for Scudamore’s pardon. He says he’s called the Savage Knight (which was a nickname of Arthegall during the tournament in Canto IV). (full context)
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Arthegall talks about being defeated in a tournament recently by a knight with an enchanted spear,... (full context)
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Arthegall and Scudamore ride and eventually come across Britomart. Scudamore charges her first but gets knocked... (full context)
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Britomart is equally strong with just her sword, pushing Arthegall back and wounding him. The two continue to go back and forth, not realizing each... (full context)
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All of a sudden Arthegall feels his desire for vengeance leave him, and it’s like he’s paralyzed. He drops his... (full context)
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...is also amazed. Glauce is happy to see a break in the fighting and asks Arthegall and Scudamore to reveal themselves to Britomart. They do so, and Britomart is surprised to... (full context)
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Scudamore says that he’s glad to see Arthegall doesn’t scorn all women. At hearing Arthegall’s name, Britomart is now so amazed that she... (full context)
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Britomart and Arthegall agree not to fight and begin to feel passion for each other. Meanwhile, Scudamore is... (full context)
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...and to enact vengeance on whoever took her away, which cheers Scudamore up a little. Arthegall leads them all to a castle where they can tend their wounds and rest. (full context)
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During their time recovering, Arthegall begins to woo Britomart. He makes promises to be faithful, and she confesses that she... (full context)
Book V: Proem
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...old virtues was justice, and so the narrator offers up a poem in praise of Arthegall, who was an instrument of justice in the world. (full context)
Book V: Canto I
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Arthegall (who appeared at the tournament in the previous book and who is Britomart’s love) is... (full context)
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Arthegall has been trained in the ways of justice from a young age by Astraea. He... (full context)
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Arthegall and Talus go to find Eirena. Along the way, they run into a crying squire... (full context)
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...squire says the knight is long gone but points in the direction of a plain. Arthegall immediately sends Talus out in that direction. Talus soon catches up with the knight, whose... (full context)
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When Arthegall arrives, Sir Sanglier says he wasn’t the one who killed the headless lady. Arthegall can... (full context)
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Sir Sanglier agrees to Arthegall’s proposal, but the squire disagrees and says he’d rather his lady not be cut in... (full context)
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...Sanglier resists his punishment, but Talus forces him to take the head. The squire praises Arthegall’s sense of justice and offers to serve him, but Arthegall turns him down, saying that... (full context)
Book V: Canto II
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Arthegall happens to meet a dwarf on the road who tells him that Florimell is going... (full context)
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...Pollente takes his ill-gotten wealth to his daughter Munera, who is richer than many princes. Arthegall goes to the bridge and finds another Saracen there asking him for a toll. Arthegall... (full context)
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Pollente is skilled at fighting in water and seems to have an advantage. Arthegall gets off his horse and fights Pollente while swimming. Eventually, he sees an opportunity and... (full context)
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Arthegall goes to the castle where Pollente’s daughter Munera lives. With Talus’s help, Arthegall breaks into... (full context)
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Munera has hands of gold and feet of silver. Though she pleads for mercy, Arthegall chops off her hands and feet, then nails them up so that everyone can see,... (full context)
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Arthegall and Talus set out again, and they soon come across a giant. The giant has... (full context)
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Arthegall argues that the world is already balanced and that things that die and return to... (full context)
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The giant’s followers see this and raise their weapons against Arthegall and Talus. Arthegall is dismayed, because he doesn’t want to get his noble hands dirty... (full context)
Book V: Canto III
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Arthegall arrives in the courtyard, and with him is Braggadochio, who met up with Arthegall along... (full context)
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...Florimell comes to greet all the knights. Braggadochio then comes forward with his shield (which Arthegall used) and everyone cheers Braggadochio’s name. When Florimell comes to congratulate him, however, Braggadochio brags... (full context)
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Arthegall can no longer stand to watch Braggadochio lie, so he steps forward to tell everyone... (full context)
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Arthegall calls real Florimell forward. But as soon as real Florimell stands next to the false... (full context)
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...crowd, and he confronts Braggadochio about stealing his horse (which happened back in Book II). Arthegall is moved by the story but asks Guyon to prove his claims. Guyon describes a... (full context)
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Arthegall wants to slay Braggadochio, but Sir Guyon says that Braggadochio’s shame is punishment enough. Talus... (full context)
Book V: Canto IV
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Arthegall leaves Florimell and Marinell’s wedding festivities. As he travels, he meets two handsome squires who... (full context)
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...But he says he can prove the treasure belongs to Philtera, just like she said. Arthegall says he’ll mediate the argument to help them reach a decision. (full context)
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Arthegall starts by asking Amidas what right he has to keep the land that the sea... (full context)
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Arthegall comes across a knight who has his hands tied behind his back, a noose around... (full context)
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Arthegall asks Sir Turpine how he ended up in this situation. Sir Turpine explains that he... (full context)
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...of rage. She throws him to the ground and steps on his head. This causes Arthegall to interfere, and he attacks Radigund with a stroke that would have killed her if... (full context)
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Radigund and Arthegall fight until evening, with her Amazon warrior women joining the battle, but their arrows are... (full context)
Book V: Canto V
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The next morning, Arthegall and Radigund each prepare for their upcoming fight. They walk out, trumpets sound, and a... (full context)
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When Arthegall sees Radigund’s face, he is temporarily enchanted by her beauty. But when she attacks, Arthegall... (full context)
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Arthegall spends a long time as the servant of Radigund. All the while, however, Radigund is... (full context)
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Clarinda goes to explain Radigund’s feelings to Arthegall. Arthegall explains that even if he wanted to, he doesn’t have the means to show... (full context)
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Clarinda reports back to Radigund that Arthegall is obstinate and would rather die than love her. Radigund rages, then composes herself. She... (full context)
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Clarinda lies to Arthegall when she visits him, saying that she is asking Radigund to treat him better but... (full context)
Book V: Canto VI
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...who could not be subdued by the Amazons, leaves to tell Britomart about the situation Arthegall is in. Britomart had been waiting for him for a while, sometimes blaming her own... (full context)
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Britomart angrily assumes at first that Arthegall is wooing Radigund, but Talus assures her he’s in no state to do so. Convinced... (full context)
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...Dolon has three sons, and as it turns out, his oldest son was slain by Arthegall—Dolon believes that Britomart is Arthegall (since she hasn’t taken off her armor). (full context)
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...but he’s nowhere to be found. She and Talus leave, coming to the bridge where Arthegall fought and killed Pollente. Two pagan knights challenge her, but she kills them both. (full context)
Book V: Canto VII
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...them about her strange dream. One priest explains that the crocodile actually represents Britomart’s love, Arthegall, and that the lion represents their eventual child, who will rule over all the land.... (full context)
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...killing any of the warriors that attack him. Britomart goes into the prison and finds Arthegall there. She asks why he’s wearing women’s clothes and has him change back into typical... (full context)
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...She frees the other imprisoned knights and makes them magistrates, who pledge an oath to Arthegall. Arthegall returns to his original quest, which saddens Britomart, but she understands and so holds... (full context)
Book V: Canto VIII
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Though beauty is one of the most tempting things on earth, nothing can stop Sir Arthegall from completing his duties to the Faerie Queene Gloriana. Back on his quest, he comes... (full context)
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Samient sees Arthegall and asks for help. He responds by killing one of the knights chasing her, then... (full context)
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Arthegall asks who the two knights they just killed were. Arthur doesn’t know; he just saw... (full context)
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...then sent the two knights out to chase after Samient (where they were killed by Arthegall and Arthur). (full context)
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Arthegall proposes dressing up in the armor of one of the slain knights and pretending that... (full context)
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...and hangs it up, enraging Adicia. She plans to kill Samient with a knife, but Arthegall intervenes. This only increases Adicia’s anger. She wanders off, eventually turning into a tiger and... (full context)
Book V: Canto IX
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Arthegall and Arthur spend some time enjoying the dead Sultan’s house before deciding it’s time to... (full context)
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Samient leads Arthegall and Arthur to Malengin’s cave. When they arrive, Samient goes first and tries to call... (full context)
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...Malengin, he uses his flail to break his bones and disembowel him. Talus, Arthur, and Arthegall leave him to be eaten by vultures, then free Samient as they continue their journey... (full context)
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Arthegall, Arthur, and Samient finally make it to the court of the queen Mercilla. Many splendid... (full context)
Book V: Canto X
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...by all in the court and Mercilla regretfully allows her to be executed. Arthur and Arthegall remain in Mercilla’s court for a while. (full context)
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...of the surviving children ask Mercilla for help. Mercilla sends Arthur out to help, while Arthegall goes off on his own separate quest. (full context)
Book V: Canto XI
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Meanwhile, Arthegall has just left Mercilla and is on his own adventure. He is still trying to... (full context)
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Arthegall continues on until he comes to a knight who is being bothered by an insistent... (full context)
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...from Grantorto. He then sent a crowd to fetch her (the same crowd that attacked Arthegall when he tried to free Burbon). (full context)
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Arthegall asks about Burbon’s broken shield. Burbon responds that he was originally dubbed a knight by... (full context)
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The peasants crowd around Arthegall and Burbon like flies, but they’re no match for Talus’s iron flail. Arthegall and Burbon... (full context)
Book V: Canto XII
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The time for Arthegall’s meeting with Grantorto draws near. As he’s traveling near the coast, he happens to find... (full context)
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Arthegall, Sir Sergis, and Talus draw near Grantorto and send out a message to say that... (full context)
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...his armor. Trumpets sound, and the battle begins. Grantorto strikes very quickly and powerfully, but Arthegall is prepared. Nevertheless, Grantorto’s iron ax wounds Arthegall, and Grantorto seems to go for a... (full context)
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Grantorto tries to get his ax out of Arthegall’s shield but can’t. Using his blade Chrysaor, Arthegall hits Grantorto on the helmet, staggering him... (full context)
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Eventually, Arthegall leaves because he must return to Faerie Court. As he’s traveling back, he runs into... (full context)
Book VI: Canto I
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...is loved by all. Calidore heads out from court on an adventure and runs into Arthegall, returning from his victory over Grantorto (at the end of the previous book). Arthegall asks... (full context)