The Faerie Queene

The Faerie Queene

by

Edmund Spenser

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Braggadochio Character Analysis

Braggadochio is a recurring villain who first appears in Book II after stealing Sir Guyon’s horse. He travels with Trompart, a servant who is forced into serving Braggadochio and soon learns how to flatter him. As his name suggests, Braggadochio boasts a lot but often can’t back up his boasts with actions, choosing to run away from conflict. Braggadochio represents the opposite of a good knight, showing some outward signs of bravery but ultimately proving himself to be nothing more than a coward.
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Braggadochio Character Timeline in The Faerie Queene

The timeline below shows where the character Braggadochio appears in The Faerie Queene. The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance.
Book II: Canto III
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
...orphan baby Ruddymane. Sir Guyon walks because his horse was stolen by a man named Braggadochio. Braggadochio stole the horse by boasting and pretending to be strong. The servant who was... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
In their travels, Braggadochio and Trompart run into Archimago. Archimago figures Braggadochio must be a grand knight who would... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Archimago advises Braggadochio to get a proper sword in order to slay the Redcross Knight and Sir Guyon,... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Braggadochio and Trompart set off again, and they meet a lady in hunting clothes (Belphoebe). She... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Braggadochio is filled with lust and tries to grab the woman, but she fends him off... (full context)
Book III: Canto V
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...for Timias, he is found by the huntress Belphoebe, who recently won her battle with Braggadochio and has been pursuing a wild beast through the woods. She sees the wounded squire... (full context)
Book III: Canto VIII
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...is pleased. One day, they go walking in the woods until eventually they come across Braggadochio. Proud Braggadochio tells “Florimell” (the sprite in disguise) that he’d like to ride off with... (full context)
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
But as Braggadochio is riding off with the sprite disguised as Florimell, he comes across a powerful-looking knight.... (full context)
Book III: Canto X
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...a lady and believes they must be Paridell and Hellenore. In fact, however, it is Braggadochio and Trompart. (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Braggadochio tries to intimidate Malbecco, but Malbecco says he is just a pilgrim looking for the... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Braggadochio says he’ll help Malbecco get his wife, Hellenore, back (really he just wants the money),... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Malbecco hides his money, then he, Braggadochio, and Trompart head into the forest to look for Hellenore. In the woods, they hear... (full context)
Book IV: Canto II
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...appears to be Florimell, but in fact it’s the false Florimell who was travelling with Braggadochio. (full context)
Book IV: Canto IV
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
On the way to the tournament, they run into Braggadochio (who had false Florimell stolen from him by Sir Ferraugh). Braggadochio claims Florimell belongs with... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Braggadochio, however, feels that having the hag would be worse than nothing, and he doesn’t want... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Soon Paridell joins the fight. Braggadochio sees no need to get involved. Then Triamond enters the fray and wounds Ferramont, causing... (full context)
Book IV: Canto V
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Blandamour, Paridell, and Braggadochio are not happy with this outcome, however, and start arguing, their anger fueled in part... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Braggadochio takes false Florimell away in the middle of the night, and some of the other... (full context)
Book IV: Canto IX
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...on with Amoretta. Eventually, they cross paths with a troop of six riders: false Florimell, Braggadochio, a knight named Druon who loves being a bachelor, Claribell, Blandamour, and Paridell. The four... (full context)
Book V: Canto III
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Arthegall arrives in the courtyard, and with him is Braggadochio, who met up with Arthegall along the way. Arthegall sees the hundred knights imprisoning Marinell,... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Real Florimell comes to greet all the knights. Braggadochio then comes forward with his shield (which Arthegall used) and everyone cheers Braggadochio’s name. When... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
Arthegall can no longer stand to watch Braggadochio lie, so he steps forward to tell everyone that he was the one using Braggadochio’s... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Love and Friendship Theme Icon
The Role of Women Theme Icon
...the false one, the false one vanishes into nothing, leaving behind an empty gold belt. Braggadochio is shocked and dismayed. Then Arthegall takes the golden belt and puts it around the... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Just then, Sir Guyon reveals that he’s in the crowd, and he confronts Braggadochio about stealing his horse (which happened back in Book II). Arthegall is moved by the... (full context)
Virtue, Allegory, and Symbolism Theme Icon
British Identity and Nationalism Theme Icon
Protestantism Theme Icon
Deception and Lies Theme Icon
Arthegall wants to slay Braggadochio, but Sir Guyon says that Braggadochio’s shame is punishment enough. Talus carries Braggadochio off, shaving... (full context)