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Antony and Cleopatra

Antony and Cleopatra Translation Act 3, Scene 2

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Enter AGRIPPA at one door, ENOBARBUS at another

AGRIPPA

What, are the brothers parted?

AGRIPPA

What, have the brothers left?

ENOBARBUS

They have dispatched with Pompey; he is gone. The other three are sealing. Octavia weeps To part from Rome. Caesar is sad, and Lepidus, Since Pompey’s feast, as Menas says, is troubled With the greensickness.

ENOBARBUS

They have settled their affairs with Pompey; he is gone. The other three are signing the agreement. Octavia weeps that she has to leave Rome. Caeasar is sad, and Menas says that Lepidus, since Pompey's feast, is suffering from a hangover.

AGRIPPA

’Tis a noble Lepidus.

AGRIPPA

Lepidus is a noble man.

ENOBARBUS

A very fine one. Oh, how he loves Caesar!

ENOBARBUS

A very fine one. Oh, how he loves Caesar!

AGRIPPA

Nay, but how dearly he adores Mark Antony!

AGRIPPA

Yes, but how dearly he loves Mark Antony!

ENOBARBUS

Caesar? Why, he’s the Jupiter of men.

ENOBARBUS

Caesar? Why, he's like the king of the gods among men. 

AGRIPPA

What’s Antony? The god of Jupiter.

AGRIPPA

Then what is Antony? He is the king of the king of the gods.

ENOBARBUS

Spake you of Caesar? How, the nonpareil!

ENOBARBUS

Did you insult Caesar? Why, he is without equal! 

AGRIPPA

O Antony, O thou Arabian bird!

AGRIPPA

Oh Antony, you phoenix!

ENOBARBUS

Would you praise Caesar, say “Caesar.” Go no further.

ENOBARBUS

If you want to praise Caesar, simply say "Caesar." The name alone conveys all his great qualities. 

AGRIPPA

Indeed, he plied them both with excellent praises.

AGRIPPA

Indeed, Lepidus praised both of them highly. 

ENOBARBUS

But he loves Caesar best; yet he loves Antony. Hoo! Hearts, tongues, figures, scribes, bards, poets, cannot Think, speak, cast, write, sing, number—hoo!— His love to Antony. But as for Caesar, Kneel down, kneel down, and wonder.

ENOBARBUS

But he loves Caesar most; still, he does love Antony. Ha! Hearts, tongues, letters, writers, singers, poets, cannot think, speak, calculate, write, sing, or make verses—ha!—that can adequately convey his love for Antony. But as for Caesar, the only appropriate reaction is to kneel down, kneel down, and be in awe.

AGRIPPA

Both he loves.

AGRIPPA

He loves both of them. 

ENOBARBUS

They are his shards, and he their beetle.

ENOBARBUS

He is a beetle, and they are the wings he uses to fly. 

Trumpets within

So,This is to horse. Adieu, noble Agrippa.

So, I must get going. Goodbye, noble Agrippa. 

AGRIPPA

Good fortune, worthy soldier, and farewell.

AGRIPPA

Good luck, worthy soldier, and goodbye. 

Enter CAESAR, ANTONY, LEPIDUS, and OCTAVIA

ANTONY

No further, sir.

ANTONY

Speak no more, sir. 

CAESAR

You take from me a great part of myself; Use me well in ’t. —Sister, prove such a wife As my thoughts make thee, and as my farthest bond Shall pass on thy approof. —Most noble Antony, Let not the piece of virtue, which is set Betwixt us as the cement of our love, To keep it builded, be the ram to batter The fortress of it. For better might we Have loved without this mean, if on both parts This be not cherished.

CAESAR

[To CAESAR] You take a part of me away from myself by taking her; treat me well by treating her well. 

[To OCTAVIA] Sister, be as good a wife as I believe you capable of being, so that the great commitment I have made will be justified by your behavior. 

[To ANTONY] Most noble Antony, do not let this good woman—who joins us as brothers to secure our love and keep it firm—become the instrument that will destroy our love. For we might have been better friends without this intermediary, if she is not cherished by both of us. 

ANTONY

Make me not offendedIn your distrust.

ANTONY

Don't offend me by distrusting me. 

CAESAR

I have said.

CAESAR

I've said what I have to say. 

ANTONY

You shall not find, Though you be therein curious, the least cause For what you seem to fear. So the gods keep you And make the hearts of Romans serve your ends. We will here part.

ANTONY

You won't find any reason to be afraid, even though you seem quite anxious about it. May the gods protect you and bring the Roman people to serve you loyally. We will part here. 

CAESAR

Farewell, my dearest sister, fare thee well.The elements be kind to thee and makeThy spirits all of comfort! Fare thee well.

CAESAR

Goodbye, dearest sister, take care. May you have good fortune so that your feelings will be ones of comfort! Take care.

OCTAVIA

My noble brother!

OCTAVIA

My noble brother!

She weeps

ANTONY

The April’s in her eyes; it is love’s spring,And these the showers to bring it on. [To OCTAVIA] Be cheerful.

ANTONY

She weeps. April is the beginning of love, and she cries in order to bring it on

[To OCTAVIA] Be cheerful.

OCTAVIA

[To CAESAR] Sir, look well to my husband’s house, and—

OCTAVIA

[To CAESAR] Sir, take care of my husband's house, and—

CAESAR

What, Octavia?

CAESAR

What, Octavia?

OCTAVIA

I’ll tell you in your ear.

OCTAVIA

I'll whisper it to you.

She and CAESAR walk aside

ANTONY

Her tongue will not obey her heart, nor can Her heart inform her tongue —the swan’s-down feather That stands upon the swell at the full of tide And neither way inclines.

ANTONY

She cannot speak her true feelings, neither can her feelings tell her what she should say. She is so torn between her feelings for her brother and her feelings for her husband that she cannot speak.

ENOBARBUS

[aside to AGRIPPA] Will Caesar weep?

ENOBARBUS

[So only AGRIPPA can hear] Will Caesar weep?

AGRIPPA

[aside to ENOBARBUS] He has a cloud in ’s face.

AGRIPPA

[So only ENOBARBUS can hear] His face is clouded over with emotion.

ENOBARBUS

[aside to AGRIPPA] He were the worse for that, were he a horse;So is he, being a man.

ENOBARBUS

[To AGRIPPA] That would be bad for him if he were a horse. It's also bad for him as a man.

AGRIPPA

[aside to ENOBARBUS] Why, Enobarbus, When Antony found Julius Caesar dead, He cried almost to roaring, and he wept When at Philippi he found Brutus slain.

AGRIPPA

[To ENOBARBUS] Why, Enobarbus, when Antony found Julius Caesar's dead body, he cried so much he was almost roaring, and he wept at Philippi when he found Brutus dead.

ENOBARBUS

[aside to AGRIPPA] That year indeed he was troubled with a rheum.What willingly he did confound he wailed,Believe ’t, till I wept too.

ENOBARBUS

[To AGRIPPA] That year, he was indeed struck with the flu. He cried at the death of a man he willingly brought down, so much that I wept too—believe it.

CAESAR

[coming forward with OCTAVIA] No, sweet Octavia,You shall hear from me still. The time shall notOutgo my thinking on you.

CAESAR

[Joining the others with OCTAVIA] No, sweet Octavia, you will always hear from me. Time will stop before I stop thinking about you. 

ANTONY

Come, sir, come,I’ll wrestle with you in my strength of love.Look, here I have you.

ANTONY

Come, sir, come, I'll challenge you to see who can love the most. Look, I'll show you.

Embraces him

Thus I let you goAnd give you to the gods.

Thus I let you depart and commend you to the gods.

CAESAR

Adieu. Be happy.

CAESAR

Farewell. Be happy. 

LEPIDUS

[To ANTONY] Let all the number of the stars give lightTo thy fair way.

LEPIDUS

[To ANTONY] May all the stars light an easy path before you.

CAESAR

Farewell, farewell.

CAESAR

Farewell, farewell.

Kisses OCTAVIA

ANTONY

Farewell.

ANTONY

Farewell. 

Trumpets sound. Exeunt

Antony and cleopatra
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Maria devlin
About the Translator: Maria Devlin

Maria Devlin received her Ph.D. in English Literature from Harvard University, where she specialized in Renaissance drama. She has worked as a bibliographical and editorial assistant for The Norton Anthology of English Literature and for The Norton Shakespeare. She is currently working with Stephen Greenblatt to design online courses on Shakespeare, including the modules "Hamlet's Ghost" and "Shylock's Bond" offered through HarvardX. She is writing a book on Renaissance comedy.

Maria Devlin wishes to credit the following sources, which she consulted extensively in composing her translations and annotations:

William Shakespeare. The New Oxford Shakespeare: Modern Critical Edition. Eds. Gary Taylor et al. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016.

William Shakespeare. The Norton Shakespeare, 3rd ed. Eds. Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: W.W. Norton& Company, Inc., 2016.