The Decameron

The Decameron

by

Giovanni Boccaccio

Teachers and parents! Struggling with distance learning? Our Teacher Edition on The Decameron can help.

The Decameron: Day 7: Introduction Summary & Analysis

Summary
Analysis
Only Venus is still visible in the sky when the steward (Parmeno) takes the day’s supplies to the Valley of the Ladies. The sun is still rising and the nightingales are still singing when the company sets out behind him. The Valley seems even more beautiful in the morning. After they sing, eat breakfast, and amuse themselves (or rest in canopied beds tucked between the trees), they gather for the day’s tales.
On the dawn of a day that will feature bawdy and explicit stories, all signs point to sex: the planet Venus (named after the Roman goddess of love) is shining in the sky; nightingales (patron birds of lovers, which are a central feature in tale V, 4) are signing; and the Valley of the Ladies is even more luscious in the morning than it was the previous night.
Themes
Love and Sex Theme Icon